• Primordial black holes (PBHs) have long been suggested as a viable candidate for the elusive dark matter (DM). The abundance of such PBHs has been constrained using a number of astrophysical observations, except for a hitherto unexplored mass window of $M_{\rm PBH}=[10^{-14},10^{-9}]M_\odot$. Here we carry out a dense-cadence (2~min sampling rate), 7 hour-long observation of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) with the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam to search for microlensing of stars in M31 by PBHs lying in the halo regions of the Milky Way (MW) and M31. Given our simultaneous monitoring of tens of millions of stars in M31, if such light PBHs make up a significant fraction of DM, we expect to find many microlensing events for the PBH DM scenario. However, we identify only a single candidate event, which translates into the most stringent upper bounds on the abundance of PBHs in the mass range $M_{\rm PBH}\simeq [10^{-11}, 10^{-6}]M_\odot$.
  • We present results of a systematic search for gravitationally lensed quasars in Pan-STARRS1. Our final sample of candidates comprise of 46 new doubles, 2 new quads, and 6 known lenses, which we discovered independently. In the absence of spectroscopy to verify the lensing nature of the candidates, the main sources of contaminants are likely to be quasar pairs and quasar$-$star associations. Amongst the independently discovered quads is 2M1134$-$2103, for which we obtained spectroscopy for the first time, finding a redshift of 2.77 for the quasar. There is evidence for microlensing in at least one image. We perform detailed mass modeling of this system using archival imaging data, and find that the unusually large shear responsible for the diamond-like configuration can mainly be attributed to a faint companion $\sim4''$ away, and to a galaxy group $\sim30''$ away. We also set limits of $z\sim0.5-1.5$ on the redshift of the lensing galaxy, based on its brightness, the image separation of the lensed images, and an analysis of the observed photometric flux ratios.
  • We present a catalogue of 38 spectroscopically detected strong galaxy-galaxy gravitational lens candidates identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV). We were able to simulate narrow-band images for 8 of them demonstrating evidence of multiple images. Two of our systems are compound lens candidates, each with 2 background source-planes. One of these compound systems shows clear lensing features in the narrow-band image. Our sample is based on 2812 galaxies observed by the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA) integral field unit (IFU). This Spectroscopic Identification of Lensing Objects (SILO) survey extends the methodology of the Sloan Lens ACS Survey (SLACS) and BOSS Emission-Line Survey (BELLS) to lower redshift and multiple IFU spectra. We searched ~ 1.5 million spectra, of which 3065 contained multiple high signal-to-noise background emission-lines or a resolved [OII] doublet, that are included in this catalogue. Upon manual inspection, we discovered regions with multiple spectra containing background emission-lines at the same redshift, providing evidence of a common source-plane geometry which was not possible in previous SLACS and BELLS discovery programs. We estimate more than half of our candidates have an Einstein radius > 1.7", which is significantly greater than seen in SLACS and BELLS. These larger Einstein radii produce more extended images of the background galaxy increasing the probability that a background emission-line will enter one of the IFU spectroscopic fibres, making detection more likely.
  • Strong gravitational lenses with measured time delay are a powerful tool to measure cosmological parameters, especially the Hubble constant ($H_0$). Recent studies show that by combining just three multiply-imaged AGN systems, one can determine $H_0$ to 3.8% precision. Furthermore, the number of time-delay lens systems is growing rapidly, enabling, in principle, the determination of $H_0$ to 1% precision in the near future. However, as the precision increases it is important to ensure that systematic errors and biases remain subdominant. For this purpose, challenges with simulated datasets are a key component in this process. Following the experience of the past challenge on time delay, where it was shown that time delays can indeed be measured precisely and accurately at the sub-percent level, we now present the "Time Delay Lens Modeling Challenge" (TDLMC). The goal of this challenge is to assess the present capabilities of lens modeling codes and assumptions and test the level of accuracy of inferred cosmological parameters given realistic mock datasets. We invite scientists to model a set of simulated Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of 50 mock lens systems. The systems are organized in rungs, with the complexity and realism increasing going up the ladder. The goal of the challenge is to infer $H_0$ for each rung, given the HST images, the time delay, and a stellar velocity dispersion of the deflector, for a fixed background cosmology. The TDLMC challenge will start with the mock data release on 2018 January 8th, with a deadline for blind submission of 2018 August 8th. This first paper gives an overview of the challenge including the data design, and a set of metrics to quantify the modeling performance and challenge details. After the deadline, the results of the challenge will be presented in a companion paper with all challenge participants as co-authors.
  • The Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC SSP) is an excellent survey for the search for strong lenses, thanks to its area, image quality and depth. We use three different methods to look for lenses among 43,000 luminous red galaxies from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) sample with photometry from the S16A internal data release of the HSC SSP. The first method is a newly developed algorithm, named YATTALENS, which looks for arc-like features around massive galaxies and then estimates the likelihood of an object being a lens by performing a lens model fit. The second method, CHITAH, is a modeling-based algorithm originally developed to look for lensed quasars. The third method makes use of spectroscopic data to look for emission lines from objects at a different redshift from that of the main galaxy. We find 15 definite lenses, 36 highly probable lenses and 282 possible lenses. Among the three methods, YATTALENS, which was developed specifically for this problem, performs best in terms of both completeness and purity. Nevertheless five highly probable lenses were missed by YATTALENS but found by the other two methods, indicating that the three methods are highly complementary. Based on these numbers we expect to find $\sim$300 definite or probable lenses by the end of the HSC SSP.
  • Hiroaki Aihara, Robert Armstrong, Steven Bickerton, James Bosch, Jean Coupon, Hisanori Furusawa, Yusuke Hayashi, Hiroyuki Ikeda, Yukiko Kamata, Hiroshi Karoji, Satoshi Kawanomoto, Michitaro Koike, Yutaka Komiyama, Robert H. Lupton, Sogo Mineo, Hironao Miyatake, Satoshi Miyazaki, Tomoki Morokuma, Yoshiyuki Obuchi, Yukie Oishi, Yuki Okura, Paul A. Price, Tadafumi Takata, Manobu M. Tanaka, Masayuki Tanaka, Yoko Tanaka, Tomohisa Uchida, Fumihiro Uraguchi, Yousuke Utsumi, Shiang-Yu Wang, Yoshihiko Yamada, Hitomi Yamanoi, Naoki Yasuda, Nobuo Arimoto, Masashi Chiba, Francois Finet, Hiroki Fujimori, Seiji Fujimoto, Junko Furusawa, Tomotsugu Goto, Andy Goulding, James E. Gunn, Yuichi Harikane, Takashi Hattori, Masao Hayashi, Krzysztof G. Helminiak, Ryo Higuchi, Chiaki Hikage, Paul T.P. Ho, Bau-Ching Hsieh, Kuiyun Huang, Song Huang, Masatoshi Imanishi, Ikuru Iwata, Anton T. Jaelani, Hung-Yu Jian, Nobunari Kashikawa, Nobuhiko Katayama, Takashi Kojima, Akira Konno, Shintaro Koshida, Haruka Kusakabe, Alexie Leauthaud, C.-H. Lee, Lihwai Lin, Yen-Ting Lin, Rachel Mandelbaum, Yoshiki Matsuoka, Elinor Medezinski, Shoken Miyama, Rieko Momose, Anupreeta More, Surhud More, Shiro Mukae, Ryoma Murata, Hitoshi Murayama, Tohru Nagao, Fumiaki Nakata, Hiroko Niikura, Atsushi J. Nishizawa, Masamune Oguri, Nobuhiro Okabe, Yoshiaki Ono, Masato Onodera, Masafusa Onoue, Masami Ouchi, Tae-Soo Pyo, Takatoshi Shibuya, Kazuhiro Shimasaku, Melanie Simet, Joshua Speagle, David N. Spergel, Michael A. Strauss, Yuma Sugahara, Naoshi Sugiyama, Yasushi Suto, Nao Suzuki, Philip J. Tait, Masahiro Takada, Tsuyoshi Terai, Yoshiki Toba, Edwin L. Turner, Hisakazu Uchiyama, Keiichi Umetsu, Yuji Urata, Tomonori Usuda, Sherry Yeh, Suraphong Yuma
    The Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP) is a three-layered imaging survey aimed at addressing some of the most outstanding questions in astronomy today, including the nature of dark matter and dark energy. The survey has been awarded 300 nights of observing time at the Subaru Telescope and it started in March 2014. This paper presents the first public data release of HSC-SSP. This release includes data taken in the first 1.7 years of observations (61.5 nights) and each of the Wide, Deep, and UltraDeep layers covers about 108, 26, and 4 square degrees down to depths of i~26.4, ~26.5, and ~27.0 mag, respectively (5sigma for point sources). All the layers are observed in five broad bands (grizy), and the Deep and UltraDeep layers are observed in narrow bands as well. We achieve an impressive image quality of 0.6 arcsec in the i-band in the Wide layer. We show that we achieve 1-2 per cent PSF photometry (rms) both internally and externally (against Pan-STARRS1), and ~10 mas and 40 mas internal and external astrometric accuracy, respectively. Both the calibrated images and catalogs are made available to the community through dedicated user interfaces and database servers. In addition to the pipeline products, we also provide value-added products such as photometric redshifts and a collection of public spectroscopic redshifts. Detailed descriptions of all the data can be found online. The data release website is https://hsc-release.mtk.nao.ac.jp/.
  • We present an optically-selected cluster catalog from the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Subaru Strategic Program. The HSC images are sufficiently deep to detect cluster member galaxies down to $M_*\sim 10^{10.2}M_\odot$ even at $z\sim 1$, allowing a reliable cluster detection at such high redshifts. We apply the CAMIRA algorithm to the HSC Wide S16A dataset covering $\sim 232$ deg$^2$ to construct a catalog of 1921 clusters at redshift $0.1<z<1.1$ and richness $\hat{N}_{\rm mem}>15$ that roughly corresponds to $M_{\rm 200m}\gtrsim 10^{14}h^{-1}M_\odot$. We confirm good cluster photometric redshift performance, with the bias and scatter in $\Delta z/(1+z)$ being better than 0.005 and 0.01 over most of the redshift range, respectively. We compare our cluster catalog with large X-ray cluster catalogs from XXL and XMM-LSS surveys and find good correlation between richness and X-ray properties. We also study the miscentering effect from the distribution of offsets between optical and X-ray cluster centers. We confirm the high ($>0.9$) completeness and purity for high mass clusters by analyzing mock galaxy catalogs.
  • We train and apply convolutional neural networks, a machine learning technique developed to learn from and classify image data, to Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) imaging for the identification of potential strong lensing systems. An ensemble of four convolutional neural networks was trained on images of simulated galaxy-galaxy lenses. The training sets consisted of a total of 62,406 simulated lenses and 64,673 non-lens negative examples generated with two different methodologies. The networks were able to learn the features of simulated lenses with accuracy of up to 99.8% and a purity and completeness of 94-100% on a test set of 2000 simulations. An ensemble of trained networks was applied to all of the 171 square degrees of the CFHTLS wide field image data, identifying 18,861 candidates including 63 known and 139 other potential lens candidates. A second search of 1.4 million early type galaxies selected from the survey catalog as potential deflectors, identified 2,465 candidates including 117 previously known lens candidates, 29 confirmed lenses/high-quality lens candidates, 266 novel probable or potential lenses and 2097 candidates we classify as false positives. For the catalog-based search we estimate a completeness of 21-28% with respect to detectable lenses and a purity of 15%, with a false-positive rate of 1 in 671 images tested. We predict a human astronomer reviewing candidates produced by the system would identify ~20 probable lenses and 100 possible lenses per hour in a sample selected by the robot. Convolutional neural networks are therefore a promising tool for use in the search for lenses in current and forthcoming surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.
  • We report on SPT-CLJ2011-5228, a giant system of arcs created by a cluster at $z=1.06$. The arc system is notable for the presence of a bright central image. The source is a Lyman Break galaxy at $z_s=2.39$ and the mass enclosed within the 14 arc second radius Einstein ring is $10^{14.2}$ solar masses. We perform a full light profile reconstruction of the lensed images to precisely infer the parameters of the mass distribution. The brightness of the central image demands that the central total density profile of the lens be shallow. By fitting the dark matter as a generalized Navarro-Frenk-White profile---with a free parameter for the inner density slope---we find that the break radius is $270^{+48}_{-76}$ kpc, and that the inner density falls with radius to the power $-0.38\pm0.04$ at 68 percent confidence. Such a shallow profile is in strong tension with our understanding of relaxed cold dark matter halos; dark matter only simulations predict the inner density should fall as $r^{-1}$. The tension can be alleviated if this cluster is in fact a merger; a two halo model can also reconstruct the data, with both clumps (density going as $r^{-0.8}$ and $r^{-1.0}$) much more consistent with predictions from dark matter only simulations. At the resolution of our Dark Energy Survey imaging, we are unable to choose between these two models, but we make predictions for forthcoming Hubble Space Telescope imaging that will decisively distinguish between them.
  • We present a list of galaxy-scale lens candidates including a highly probable interacting galaxy-scale lens in the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) imaging survey. We combine HSC imaging with the blended-spectra catalog from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey to identify lens candidates, and use lens mass modeling to confirm the candidates. We find 46 matches between the HSC S14A_0b imaging data release and the GAMA catalog. Ten of them are probable lens systems according to their morphology and redshifts. There is one system with an interacting galaxy pair, HSC J084928+000949, that has a valid mass model. We predict the total mass enclosed by the Einstein radius of $\sim0.72$" ($\sim1.65$kpc) for this new expected lens system to be $\sim10^{10.59}M_{\odot}$. Using the photometry in the {\it grizy} bands of the HSC survey and stellar population synthesis modeling with a Salpeter stellar initial mass function, we estimate the stellar mass within the Einstein radius to be $\sim10^{10.46}\,M_{\odot}$. We thus find a dark matter mass fraction within the Einstein radius of $\sim25\%$. Further spectroscopy or high-resolution imaging would allow confirmation of the nature of these lens candidates. The particular system with the interacting galaxy pair, if confirmed, would provide an opportunity to study the interplay between dark matter and stars as galaxies build up through hierarchical mergers.
  • We report the serendipitous discovery of a quadruply lensed source at $z_{\rm s}=3.76$, HSC~J115252+004733, from the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Survey. The source is lensed by an early-type galaxy at $z_{\rm l}=0.466$ and a satellite galaxy. Here, we investigate the properties of the source by studying its size and luminosity from the imaging and the luminosity and velocity width of the Ly-$\alpha$ line from the spectrum. Our analyses suggest that the source is most probably a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN) but the possibility of it being a compact bright galaxy (e.g., a Lyman-$\alpha$ emitter or Lyman Break Galaxy) cannot be excluded. The brighter pair of lensed images appears point-like except in the HSC $i$-band (with a seeing $\sim0.5"$). The extended emission in the $i$-band image could be due to the host galaxy underneath the AGN, or alternatively, due to a highly compact lensed galaxy (without AGN) which appears point-like in all bands except in $i$-band. We also find that the flux ratio of the brighter pair of images is different in the Ks-band compared to optical wavelengths. Phenomena such as differential extinction and intrinsic variability cannot explain this chromatic variation. While microlensing from stars in the foreground galaxy is less likely to be the cause, it cannot be ruled out completely. If the galaxy hosts an AGN, then this represents the highest redshift quadruply imaged AGN known to date, enabling study of a distant LLAGN. Discovery of this unusually compact and faint source demonstrates the potential of the HSC survey.
  • We present predictions for time delays between multiple images of the gravitationally lensed supernova, iPTF16geu, which was recently discovered from the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF). As the supernova is of Type Ia where the intrinsic luminosity is usually well-known, accurately measured time delays of the multiple images could provide tight constraints on the Hubble constant. According to our lens mass models constrained by the {\it Hubble Space Telescope} F814W image, we expect the maximum relative time delay to be less than a day, which is consistent with the maximum of 100 hours reported by Goobar et al. but places a stringent upper limit. Furthermore, the fluxes of most of the supernova images depart from expected values suggesting that they are affected by microlensing. The microlensing timescales are small enough that they may pose significant problems to measure the time delays reliably. Our lensing rate calculation indicates that the occurrence of a lensed SN in iPTF is likely. However, the observed total magnification of iPTF16geu is larger than expected, given its redshift. This may be a further indication of ongoing microlensing in this system.
  • We report the serendipitous discovery of HSC J142449-005322, a double source plane lens system in the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program. We dub the system Eye of Horus. The lens galaxy is a very massive early-type galaxy with stellar mass of ~7x10^11 Msun located at z_L=0.795. The system exhibits two arcs/rings with clearly different colors, including several knots. We have performed spectroscopic follow-up observations of the system with FIRE on Magellan. The outer ring is confirmed at z_S2=1.988 with multiple emission lines, while the inner arc and counterimage is confirmed at z_S1=1.302. This makes it the first double source plane system with spectroscopic redshifts of both sources. Interestingly, redshifts of two of the knots embedded in the outer ring are found to be offset by delta_z=0.002 from the other knots, suggesting that the outer ring consists of at least two distinct components in the source plane. We perform lens modeling with two independent codes and successfully reproduce the main features of the system. However, two of the lensed sources separated by ~0.7 arcsec cannot be reproduced by a smooth potential, and the addition of substructure to the lens potential is required to reproduce them. Higher-resolution imaging of the system will help decipher the origin of this lensing feature and potentially detect the substructure.
  • We report the discovery of 13 confirmed two-image quasar lenses from a systematic search for gravitationally lensed quasars in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We adopted a methodology similar to that used in the SDSS Quasar Lens Search (SQLS). In addition to the confirmed lenses, we report 11 quasar pairs with small angular separations ($\lesssim$2") confirmed from our spectroscopy, which are either projected pairs, physical binaries, or possibly quasar lens systems whose lens galaxies have not yet been detected. The newly discovered quasar lens system, SDSS J1452+4224 at zs$\approx$4.8 is one of the highest redshift multiply imaged quasars found to date. Furthermore, we have over 50 good lens candidates yet to be followed up. Owing to the heterogeneous selection of BOSS quasars, the lens sample presented here does not have a well-defined selection function.
  • We show that the projected number density profiles of SDSS photometric galaxies around galaxy clusters displays strong evidence for the splashback radius, a sharp halo edge corresponding to the location of the first orbital apocenter of satellite galaxies after their infall. We split the clusters into two subsamples with different mean projected radial distances of their members, $\langle R_{\rm mem}\rangle$, at fixed richness and redshift, and show that the sample with smaller $\langle R_{\rm mem}\rangle$ has a smaller ratio of the splashback radius to the traditional halo boundary $R_{\rm 200m}$, than the subsample with larger $\langle R_{\rm mem}\rangle$, indicative of different mass accretion rates for the two subsamples. The same cluster samples were recently used by Miyatake et al. to show that their large-scale clustering differs despite their similar weak lensing masses, demonstrating strong evidence for halo assembly bias. We expand on this result by presenting a 6.6-$\sigma$ detection of halo assembly bias using the cluster-photometric galaxy cross-correlations. Our measured splashback radii are smaller, while the strength of the assembly bias signal is stronger, than expectations from N-body simulations based on the $\Lambda$-dominated, cold dark matter structure formation model. Dynamical friction or cluster-finding systematics such as miscentering or projection effects are not likely to be the sole source of these discrepancies.
  • We report the discovery of 29 promising (and 59 total) new lens candidates from the CFHT Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) based on about 11 million classifications performed by citizen scientists as part of the first Space Warps lens search. The goal of the blind lens search was to identify lens candidates missed by robots (the RingFinder on galaxy scales and ArcFinder on group/cluster scales) which had been previously used to mine the CFHTLS for lenses. We compare some properties of the samples detected by these algorithms to the Space Warps sample and find them to be broadly similar. The image separation distribution calculated from the Space Warps sample shows that previous constraints on the average density profile of lens galaxies are robust. SpaceWarps recovers about 65% of known lenses, while the new candidates show a richer variety compared to those found by the two robots. This detection rate could be increased to 80% by only using classifications performed by expert volunteers (albeit at the cost of a lower purity), indicating that the training and performance calibration of the citizen scientists is very important for the success of Space Warps. In this work we present the SIMCT pipeline, used for generating in situ a sample of realistic simulated lensed images. This training sample, along with the false positives identified during the search, has a legacy value for testing future lens finding algorithms. We make the pipeline and the training set publicly available.
  • We describe Space Warps, a novel gravitational lens discovery service that yields samples of high purity and completeness through crowd-sourced visual inspection. Carefully produced colour composite images are displayed to volunteers via a web- based classification interface, which records their estimates of the positions of candidate lensed features. Images of simulated lenses, as well as real images which lack lenses, are inserted into the image stream at random intervals; this training set is used to give the volunteers instantaneous feedback on their performance, as well as to calibrate a model of the system that provides dynamical updates to the probability that a classified image contains a lens. Low probability systems are retired from the site periodically, concentrating the sample towards a set of lens candidates. Having divided 160 square degrees of Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) imaging into some 430,000 overlapping 82 by 82 arcsecond tiles and displaying them on the site, we were joined by around 37,000 volunteers who contributed 11 million image classifications over the course of 8 months. This Stage 1 search reduced the sample to 3381 images containing candidates; these were then refined in Stage 2 to yield a sample that we expect to be over 90% complete and 30% pure, based on our analysis of the volunteers performance on training images. We comment on the scalability of the SpaceWarps system to the wide field survey era, based on our projection that searches of 10$^5$ images could be performed by a crowd of 10$^5$ volunteers in 6 days.
  • We present spectroscopic confirmation of two new lensed quasars via data obtained at the 6.5m Magellan/Baade Telescope. The lens candidates have been selected from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and WISE based on their multi-band photometry and extended morphology in DES images. Images of DES J0115-5244 show two blue point sources at either side of a red galaxy. Our long-slit data confirm that both point sources are images of the same quasar at $z_{s}=1.64.$ The Einstein Radius estimated from the DES images is $0.51$". DES J2200+0110 is in the area of overlap between DES and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Two blue components are visible in the DES and SDSS images. The SDSS fiber spectrum shows a quasar component at $z_{s}=2.38$ and absorption compatible with Mg II and Fe II at $z_{l}=0.799$, which we tentatively associate with the foreground lens galaxy. The long-slit Magellan spectra show that the blue components are resolved images of the same quasar. The Einstein Radius is $0.68$" corresponding to an enclosed mass of $1.6\times10^{11}\,M_{\odot}.$ Three other candidates were observed and rejected, two being low-redshift pairs of starburst galaxies, and one being a quasar behind a blue star. These first confirmation results provide an important empirical validation of the data-mining and model-based selection that is being applied to the entire DES dataset.
  • Strong gravitationally lensed quasars provide powerful means to study galaxy evolution and cosmology. Current and upcoming imaging surveys will contain thousands of new lensed quasars, augmenting the existing sample by at least two orders of magnitude. To find such lens systems, we built a robot, CHITAH, that hunts for lensed quasars by modeling the configuration of the multiple quasar images. Specifically, given an image of an object that might be a lensed quasar, CHITAH first disentangles the light from the supposed lens galaxy and the light from the multiple quasar images based on color information. A simple rule is designed to categorize the given object as a potential four-image (quad) or two-image (double) lensed quasar system. The configuration of the identified quasar images is subsequently modeled to classify whether the object is a lensed quasar system. We test the performance of CHITAH using simulated lens systems based on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. For bright quads with large image separations (with Einstein radius $r_{\rm ein}>1.1"$) simulated using Gaussian point-spread functions, a high true-positive rate (TPR) of $\sim$90% and a low false-positive rate of $\sim$$3\%$ show that this is a promising approach to search for new lens systems. We obtain high TPR for lens systems with $r_{\rm ein}\gtrsim0.5"$, so the performance of CHITAH is set by the seeing. We further feed a known gravitational lens system, COSMOS 5921$+$0638, to CHITAH, and demonstrate that CHITAH is able to classify this real gravitational lens system successfully. Our newly built CHITAH is omnivorous and can hunt in any ground-based imaging surveys.
  • Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are considered among the best understood samples of galaxies, and they are employed in a broad range of cosmological studies. Because they form a relatively homogeneous population, with high stellar masses and red colors, they are expected to occupy halos in a relatively simple way. In this paper, we study how LRGs occupy massive halos via direct counts in clusters and we reveal several unexpected trends suggesting that the connection between LRGs and dark matter halos may not be straightforward. Using the redMaPPer cluster catalog, we derive the central occupation of LRGs as a function richness, Ncen({\lambda}). Assuming no correlation between cluster mass and central galaxy luminosity at fixed richness, we show that clusters contain a significantly lower fraction of central LRGs than predicted from the two-point correlation function. At halo masses of 10^14.5 Msun, we find Ncen=0.73, compared to Ncen of 0.89 from correlation studies. Our central occupation function for LRGs converges to 0.95 at large halo masses. A strong anti-correlation between central luminosity and cluster mass at fixed richness is required to reconcile our results with those based on clustering studies. We also derive P_BNC, the probability that the brightest cluster member is not the central galaxy. We find P_BNC ~ 20-30% which is a factor of ~2 lower than the value found by Skibba et al. 2011. Finally, we study the radial offsets of bright non-central LRGs from cluster centers and show that bright non-central LRGs follow a different radial distribution compared to red cluster members, which follow a Navarro-Frank-White profile. This work demonstrates that even the most massive clusters do not always have an LRG at the center, and that the brightest galaxy in a cluster is not always the central galaxy.
  • We develop a method to enable collaborative modelling of gravitational lenses and lens candidates, that could be used by non-professional lens enthusiasts. It uses an existing free-form modelling program (glass), but enables the input to this code to be provided in a novel way, via a user-generated diagram that is essentially a sketch of an arrival-time surface. We report on an implementation of this method, SpaghettiLens, which has been tested in a modelling challenge using 29 simulated lenses drawn from a larger set created for the Space Warps citizen science strong lens search. We find that volunteers from this online community asserted the image parities and time ordering consistently in some lenses, but made errors in other lenses depending on the image morphology. While errors in image parity and time ordering lead to large errors in the mass distribution, the enclosed mass was found to be more robust: the model-derived Einstein radii found by the volunteers were consistent with those produced by one of the professional team, suggesting that given the appropriate tools, gravitational lens modelling is a data analysis activity that can be crowd-sourced to good effect. Ideas for improvement are discussed, these include (a) overcoming the tendency of the models to be shallower than the correct answer in test cases, leading to systematic overestimation of the Einstein radius by 10 per cent at present, and (b) detailed modelling of arcs.
  • We present the result of Subaru Telescope multi-band adaptive optics observations of the complex gravitationally lensed quasar SDSS J1405+0959, which is produced by two lensing galaxies. These observations reveal dramatically enhanced morphological detail, leading to the discovery of an additional object 0. 26'' from the secondary lensing galaxy, as well as three collinear clumps located in between the two lensing galaxies. The new object is likely to be the third quasar image, although the possibility that it is a galaxy cannot be entirely excluded. If confirmed via future observations, it would be the first three image lensed quasar produced by two galaxy lenses. In either case, we show based on gravitational lensing models and photometric redshift that the collinear clumps represent merging images of a portion of the quasar host galaxy, with a magnification factor of 15 - 20, depending on the model.
  • Objects of known brightness, like Type Ia supernovae (SNIa), can be used to measure distances. If a massive object warps spacetime to form multiple images of a background SNIa, a direct test of cosmic expansion is also possible. However, these lensing events must first be distinguished from other rare phenomena. Recently, a supernova was found to shine much brighter than normal for its distance, which resulted in a debate: was it a new type of superluminous supernova or a normal SNIa magnified by a hidden gravitational lens? Here we report that a spectrum obtained after the supernova faded away shows the presence of a foreground galaxy--the first found to strongly magnify a SNIa. We discuss how more lensed SNIa may be found than previously predicted.
  • Recently, Chornock and co-workers announced the Pan-STARRS discovery of a transient source reaching an apparent peak luminosity of ~4x10^44 erg s^-1. We show that the spectra of this transient source are well fit by normal Type Ia supernova (SNIa) templates. The multi-band colors and light-curve shapes are also consistent with normal SNeIa at the spectroscopically determined redshift of z=1.3883; however, the observed flux is a constant factor of ~30 times too bright in each band over time as compared to the templates. At minimum, this shows that the peak luminosities inferred from the light-curve widths of some SNeIa will deviate significantly from the established, empirical relation used by cosmologists. We argue on physical grounds that the observed fluxes do not reflect an intrinsically luminous SNIa, but rather PS1-10afx is a normal SNIa whose flux has been magnified by an external source. The only known astrophysical source capable of such magnification is a gravitational lens. Given the lack of obvious lens candidates, such as galaxy clusters, in the vicinity, we further argue that the lens is a supermassive black hole or a comparatively low-mass dark matter halo. In this case, the lens continues to magnify the underlying host galaxy light. If confirmed, this discovery could impact a broad range of topics including cosmology, gamma-ray bursts, and dark matter halos.
  • We quantify the accuracy with which the cosmological parameters characterizing the energy density of matter (\Omega_m), the amplitude of the power spectrum of matter fluctuations (\sigma_8), the energy density of neutrinos (\Omega_{\nu}) and the dark energy equation of state (w_0) can be constrained using data from large galaxy redshift surveys. We advocate a joint analysis of the abundance of galaxies, galaxy clustering, and the galaxy-galaxy weak lensing signal in order to simultaneously constrain the halo occupation statistics (i.e., galaxy bias) and the cosmological parameters of interest. We parameterize the halo occupation distribution of galaxies in terms of the conditional luminosity function and use the analytical framework of the halo model described in our companion paper (van den Bosch et al. 2012), to predict the relevant observables. By performing a Fisher matrix analysis, we show that a joint analysis of these observables, even with the precision with which they are currently measured from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, can be used to obtain tight constraints on the cosmological parameters, fully marginalized over uncertainties in galaxy bias. We demonstrate that the cosmological constraints from such an analysis are nearly uncorrelated with the halo occupation distribution constraints, thus, minimizing the systematic impact of any imperfections in modeling the halo occupation statistics on the cosmological constraints. In fact, we demonstrate that the constraints from such an analysis are both complementary to and competitive with existing constraints on these parameters from a number of other techniques, such as cluster abundances, cosmic shear and/or baryon acoustic oscillations, thus paving the way to test the concordance cosmological model.