• Foveation and focus cue are the two most discussed topics on vision in designing near-eye displays. Foveation reduces rendering load by omitting spatial details in the content that the peripheral vision cannot appreciate; Providing richer focal cue can resolve vergence-accommodation conflict thereby lessening visual discomfort in using near-eye displays. We performed two psychophysical experiments to investigate the relationship between foveation and focus cue. The first study measured blur discrimination sensitivity as a function of visual eccentricity, where we found discrimination thresholds significantly lower than previously reported. The second study measured depth discrimination threshold where we found a clear dependency on visual eccentricity. We discuss the results from the two studies and suggest further investigation.
  • Virtual colonoscopy (VC) allows a physician to virtually navigate within a reconstructed 3D colon model searching for colorectal polyps. Though VC is widely recognized as a highly sensitive and specific test for identifying polyps, one limitation is the reading time, which can take over 30 minutes per patient. Large amounts of the colon are often devoid of polyps, and a way of identifying these polyp-free segments could be of valuable use in reducing the required reading time for the interrogating radiologist. To this end, we have tested the ability of the collective crowd intelligence of non-expert workers to identify polyp candidates and polyp-free regions. We presented twenty short videos flying through a segment of a virtual colon to each worker, and the crowd was asked to determine whether or not a possible polyp was observed within that video segment. We evaluated our framework on Amazon Mechanical Turk and found that the crowd was able to achieve a sensitivity of 80.0% and specificity of 86.5% in identifying video segments which contained a clinically proven polyp. Since each polyp appeared in multiple consecutive segments, all polyps were in fact identified. Using the crowd results as a first pass, 80% of the video segments could in theory be skipped by the radiologist, equating to a significant time savings and enabling more VC examinations to be performed.
  • We present a computer-aided detection algorithm for polyps in optical colonoscopy images. Polyps are the precursors to colon cancer. In the US alone, more than 14 million optical colonoscopies are performed every year, mostly to screen for polyps. Optical colonoscopy has been shown to have an approximately 25% polyp miss rate due to the convoluted folds and bends present in the colon. In this work, we present an automatic detection algorithm to detect these polyps in the optical colonoscopy images. We use a machine learning algorithm to infer a depth map for a given optical colonoscopy image and then use a detailed pre-built polyp profile to detect and delineate the boundaries of polyps in this given image. We have achieved the best recall of 84.0% and the best specificity value of 83.4%.
  • Current connectivity diagrams of human brain image data are either overly complex or overly simplistic. In this work we introduce simple yet accurate interactive visual representations of multiple brain image structures and the connectivity among them. We map cortical surfaces extracted from human brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data onto 2D surfaces that preserve shape (angle), extent (area), and spatial (neighborhood) information for 2D (circular disk) and 3D (spherical) mapping, split these surfaces into separate patches, and cluster functional and diffusion tractography MRI connections between pairs of these patches. The resulting visualizations are easier to compute on and more visually intuitive to interact with than the original data, and facilitate simultaneous exploration of multiple data sets, modalities, and statistical maps.
  • Radiological imaging of the prostate is becoming more popular among researchers and clinicians in searching for diseases, primarily cancer. Scans might be acquired with different equipment or at different times for prognosis monitoring, with patient movement between scans, resulting in multiple datasets that need to be registered. For these cases, we introduce a method for volumetric registration using curvature flow. Multiple prostate datasets are mapped to canonical solid spheres, which are in turn aligned and registered through the use of identified landmarks on or within the gland. Theoretical proof and experimental results show that our method produces homeomorphisms with feature constraints. We provide thorough validation of our method by registering prostate scans of the same patient in different orientations, from different days and using different modes of MRI. Our method also provides the foundation for a general group-wise registration using a standard reference, defined on the complex plane, for any input. In the present context, this can be used for registering as many scans as needed for a single patient or different patients on the basis of age, weight or even malignant and non-malignant attributes to study the differences in general population. Though we present this technique with a specific application to the prostate, it is generally applicable for volumetric registration problems.
  • Radiological imaging of prostate is becoming more popular among researchers and clinicians in searching for diseases, primarily cancer. Scans might be acquired at different times, with patient movement between scans, or with different equipment, resulting in multiple datasets that need to be registered. For this issue, we introduce a registration method using anatomical feature-guided mutual information. Prostate scans of the same patient taken in three different orientations are first aligned for the accurate detection of anatomical features in 3D. Then, our pipeline allows for multiple modalities registration through the use of anatomical features, such as the interior urethra of prostate and gland utricle, in a bijective way. The novelty of this approach is the application of anatomical features as the pre-specified corresponding landmarks for prostate registration. We evaluate the registration results through both artificial and clinical datasets. Registration accuracy is evaluated by performing statistical analysis of local intensity differences or spatial differences of anatomical landmarks between various MR datasets. Evaluation results demonstrate that our method statistics-significantly improves the quality of registration. Although this strategy is tested for MRI-guided brachytherapy, the preliminary results from these experiments suggest that it can be also applied to other settings such as transrectal ultrasound-guided or CT-guided therapy, where the integration of preoperative MRI may have a significant impact upon treatment planning and guidance.
  • In this paper, we first give a high-level overview of medical visualization development over the past 30 years, focusing on key developments and the trends that they represent. During this discussion, we will refer to a number of key papers that we have also arranged on the medical visualization research timeline. Based on the overview and our observations of the field, we then identify and discuss the medical visualization research challenges that we foresee for the coming decade.