• Using high resolution spectra from the VLT LEGA-C program, we reconstruct the star formation histories (SFHs) of 607 galaxies at redshifts $z = 0.6-1.0$ and stellar masses $\gtrsim10^{10}$M$_{\odot}$ using a custom full spectrum fitting algorithm that incorporates the emcee and FSPS packages. We show that the mass-weighted age of a galaxy correlates strongly with stellar velocity dispersion ($\sigma_*$) and ongoing star-formation (SF) activity, with the stellar content in higher-$\sigma_*$ galaxies having formed earlier and faster. The SFHs of quiescent galaxies are generally consistent with passive evolution since their main SF epoch, but a minority show clear evidence of a rejuvenation event in their recent past. The mean age of stars in galaxies that are star-forming is generally significantly younger, with SF peaking after $z<1.5$ for almost all star-forming galaxies in the sample: many of these still have either constant or rising SFRs on timescales $>100$Myrs. This indicates that $z>2$ progenitors of $z\sim1$ star-forming galaxies are generally far less massive. Finally, despite considerable variance in the individual SFHs, we show that the current SF activity of massive galaxies ($>$L$_*$) at $z\sim1$ correlates with SF levels at least $3$Gyrs prior: SFHs retain `memory' on a large fraction of the Hubble time. Our results illustrate a novel approach to resolve the formation phase of galaxies, and in identifying their individual evolutionary paths, connects progenitors and descendants across cosmic time. This is uniquely enabled by the high-quality continuum spectroscopy provided by the LEGA-C survey.
  • A decade of study has established that the molecular gas properties of star-forming galaxies follow coherent scaling relations out to z~3, suggesting remarkable regularity of the interplay between molecular gas, star formation, and stellar growth. Passive galaxies, however, are expected to be gas-poor and therefore faint, and thus little is known about molecular gas in passive galaxies beyond the local universe. Here we present deep Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of CO(2-1) emission in 8 massive (Mstar ~ 10^11 Msol) galaxies at z~0.7 selected to lie a factor of 3-10 below the star-forming sequence at this redshift, drawn from the Large Early Galaxy Astrophysics Census (LEGA-C) survey. We significantly detect half the sample, finding molecular gas fractions <~0.1. We show that the molecular and stellar rotational axes are broadly consistent, arguing that the molecular gas was not accreted after the galaxies became quiescent. We find that scaling relations extrapolated from the star-forming population over-predict both the gas fraction and gas depletion time for passive objects, suggesting the existence of either a break or large increase in scatter in these relations at low specific star formation rate. Finally, we show that the gas fractions of the passive galaxies we have observed at intermediate redshifts are naturally consistent with evolution into local massive early-type galaxies by continued low-level star formation, with no need for further gas accretion or dynamical stabilization of the gas reservoirs in the intervening 6 billion years.
  • The process by which massive galaxies transition from blue, star-forming disks into red, quiescent galaxies remains one of the most poorly-understood aspects of galaxy evolution. In this investigation, we attempt to gain a better understanding of how star formation is quenched by focusing on a massive post-starburst galaxy at z = 0.747. The target has a high stellar mass and a molecular gas fraction of ~30% -- unusually high for its low star formation rate. We look for indicators of star formation suppression mechanisms in the stellar kinematics and age distribution of the galaxy obtained from spatially resolved Gemini Integral-Field spectra and in the gas kinematics obtained from ALMA. We find evidence of significant rotation in the stars, but we do not detect a stellar age gradient within 5 kpc. The molecular gas is aligned with the stellar component, and we see no evidence of strong gas outflows. Our target may represent the product of a merger-induced starburst or of morphological quenching; however, our results are not completely consistent with any of the prominent quenching models.
  • We present stellar rotation curves and velocity dispersion profiles for 104 quiescent galaxies at $z=0.6-1$ from the Large Early Galaxy Astrophysics Census (LEGA-C) spectroscopic survey. Rotation is typically probed across 10-20kpc, or to an average of 2.7${\rm R_e}$. Combined with central stellar velocity dispersions ($\sigma_0$) this provides the first determination of the dynamical state of a sample selected by a lack of star formation activity at large lookback time. The most massive galaxies ($M_{\star}>2\times10^{11}\,M_{\odot}$) generally show no or little rotation measured at 5kpc ($|V_5|/\sigma_0<0.2$ in 8 of 10 cases), while ${\sim}64\%$ of less massive galaxies show significant rotation. This is reminiscent of local fast- and slow-rotating ellipticals and implies that low- and high-redshift quiescent galaxies have qualitatively similar dynamical structures. We compare $|V_5|/\sigma_0$ distributions at $z\sim0.8$ and the present day by re-binning and smoothing the kinematic maps of 91 low-redshift quiescent galaxies from the CALIFA survey and find evidence for a decrease in rotational support since $z\sim1$. This result is especially strong when galaxies are compared at fixed velocity dispersion; if velocity dispersion does not evolve for individual galaxies then the rotational velocity at 5kpc was an average of ${94\pm22\%}$ higher in $z\sim0.8$ quiescent galaxies than today. Considering that the number of quiescent galaxies grows with time and that new additions to the population descend from rotationally-supported star-forming galaxies, our results imply that quiescent galaxies must lose angular momentum between $z\sim1$ and the present, presumably through dissipationless merging, and/or that the mechanism that transforms star-forming galaxies also reduces their rotational support.
  • This is the first in a series of papers examining the demographics of star-forming galaxies at $0.2<z<2.5$ in CANDELS. We study 9,100 galaxies from GOODS-S and UDS having published values of redshifts, masses, star-formation rates (SFRs), and dust attenuation ($A_V$) derived from UV-optical SED fitting. In agreement with previous works, we find that the $UVJ$ colors of a galaxy are closely correlated with its specific star-formation rate (SSFR) and $A_V$. We define rotated $UVJ$ coordinate axes, termed $S_\mathrm{SED}$ and $C_\mathrm{SED}$, that are parallel and perpendicular to the star-forming sequence and derive a quantitative calibration that predicts SSFR from $C_\mathrm{SED}$ with an accuracy of ~0.2 dex. SFRs from UV-optical fitting and from UV+IR values based on Spitzer/MIPS 24 $\mu\mathrm{m}$ agree well overall, but systematic differences of order 0.2 dex exist at high and low redshifts. A novel plotting scheme conveys the evolution of multiple galaxy properties simultaneously, and dust growth, as well as star-formation decline and quenching, exhibit "mass-accelerated evolution" ("downsizing"). A population of transition galaxies below the star-forming main sequence is identified. These objects are located between star-forming and quiescent galaxies in $UVJ$ space and have lower $A_V$ and smaller radii than galaxies on the main sequence. Their properties are consistent with their being in transit between the two regions. The relative numbers of quenched, transition, and star-forming galaxies are given as a function of mass and redshift.
  • Drawing from the LEGA-C dataset, we present the spectroscopic view of the stellar population across a large volume- and mass-selected sample of galaxies at large lookback time. We measure the 4000\AA\ break (D$_n$4000) and Balmer absorption line strengths (probed by H$\delta$) from 1019 high-quality spectra of $z=0.6 - 1.0$ galaxies with $M_\ast = 2 \times 10^{10} M_\odot - 3 \times 10^{11} M_\odot$. Our analysis serves as a first illustration of the power of high-resolution, high-S/N continuum spectroscopy at intermediate redshifts as a qualitatively new tool to constrain galaxy formation models. The observed D$_n$4000-EW(H$\delta$) distribution of our sample overlaps with the distribution traced by present-day galaxies, but $z\sim 0.8$ galaxies populate that locus in a fundamentally different manner. While old galaxies dominate the present-day population at all stellar masses $> 2\times10^{10} M_\odot$, we see a bimodal D$_n$4000-EW(H$\delta$) distribution at $z\sim0.8$, implying a bimodal light-weighted age distribution. The light-weighted age depends strongly on stellar mass, with the most massive galaxies $>1\times10^{11}M_\odot$ being almost all older than 2 Gyr. At the same time we estimate that galaxies in this high mass range are only $\sim3$ Gyr younger than their $z\sim0.1$ counterparts, at odd with pure passive evolution given a difference in lookback time of $>5$ Gyr; younger galaxies must grow to $>10^{11}M_\odot$ in the meantime, and/or small amounts of young stars must keep the light-weighted ages young. Star-forming galaxies at $z\sim0.8$ have stronger H$\delta$ absorption than present-day galaxies with the same D$_n$4000, implying larger short-term variations in star-formation activity.
  • We present Hubble multi-wavelength photometric catalogs, including (up to) 17 filters with the Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field Camera 3 from the ultra-violet to near-infrared for the Hubble Frontier Fields and associated parallels. We have constructed homogeneous photometric catalogs for all six clusters and their parallels. To further expand these data catalogs, we have added ultra-deep $K_{S}$-band imaging at 2.2~\micron\ from the Very Large Telescope HAWK-I and Keck-I MOSFIRE instruments. We also add post-cryogenic \spitzer\ imaging at 3.6~\micron\ and 4.5~\micron\ with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), as well as archival IRAC 5.8~\micron\ and 8.0~\micron\ imaging when available. We introduce the public release of the multi-wavelength (0.2--8~\micron) photometric catalogs, and we describe the unique steps applied for the construction of these catalogs. Particular emphasis is given to the source detection band, the contamination of light from the bright cluster galaxies and intra-cluster light. In addition to the photometric catalogs, we provide catalogs of photometric redshifts and stellar population properties. Furthermore, this includes all the images used in the construction of the catalogs, including the combined models of bright cluster galaxies and intra-cluster light, the residual images, segmentation maps and more. These catalogs are a robust data set of the Hubble Frontier Fields and will be an important aide in designing future surveys, as well as planning follow-up programs with current and future observatories to answer key questions remaining about first light, reionization, the assembly of galaxies and many more topics, most notably, by identifying high-redshift sources to target.
  • The multiplexing capability of slitless spectroscopy is a powerful asset in creating large spectroscopic datasets, but issues such as spectral confusion make the interpretation of the data challenging. Here we present a new method to search for emission lines in the slitless spectroscopic data from the 3D-HST survey utilizing the Wide-Field Camera 3 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. Using a novel statistical technique, we can detect compact (extended) emission lines at 90% completeness down to fluxes of 1.5 (3.0) times 10^{-17} erg/s/cm^2, close to the noise level of the grism exposures, for objects detected in the deep ancillary photometric data. Unlike previous methods, the Bayesian nature allows for probabilistic line identifications, namely redshift estimates, based on secondary emission line detections and/or photometric redshift priors. As a first application, we measure the comoving number density of Extreme Emission Line Galaxies (restframe [O III] 5007 equivalent widths in excess of 500 Angstroms). We find that these galaxies are nearly 10 times more common above z~1.5 than at z<0.5. With upcoming large grism surveys such as Euclid and WFIRST as well as grisms featuring prominently on the NIRISS and NIRCam instruments on James Webb Space Telescope, methods like the one presented here will be crucial for constructing emission line redshift catalogs in an automated and well-understood manner.
  • We examine the fraction of massive ($M_{*}>10^{10} M_{\odot}$), compact star-forming galaxies (cSFGs) that host an active galactic nucleus (AGN) at $z\sim2$. These cSFGs are likely the direct progenitors of the compact quiescent galaxies observed at this epoch, which are the first population of passive galaxies to appear in large numbers in the early Universe. We identify cSFGs that host an AGN using a combination of Hubble WFC3 imaging and Chandra X-ray observations in four fields: the Chandra Deep Fields, the Extended Groth Strip, and the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey field. We find that $39.2^{+3.9}_{-3.6}$\% (65/166) of cSFGs at $1.4<z<3.0$ host an X-ray detected AGN. This fraction is 3.2 times higher than the incidence of AGN in extended star-forming galaxies with similar masses at these redshifts. This difference is significant at the $6.2\sigma$ level. Our results are consistent with models in which cSFGs are formed through a dissipative contraction that triggers a compact starburst and concurrent growth of the central black hole. We also discuss our findings in the context of cosmological galaxy evolution simulations that require feedback energy to rapidly quench cSFGs. We show that the AGN fraction peaks precisely where energy injection is needed to reproduce the decline in the number density of cSFGs with redshift. Our results suggest that the first abundant population of massive, quenched galaxies emerged directly following a phase of elevated supermassive black hole growth and further hints at a possible connection between AGN and the rapid quenching of star formation in these galaxies.
  • We investigate the stellar kinematics and stellar populations of 58 radio-loud galaxies of intermediate luminosities (L$_{3 GHz}$ $>$ 10$^{23}$ W Hz$^{-1}$ ) at 0.6 < z < 1. This sample is constructed by cross-matching galaxies from the deep VLT/VIMOS LEGA-C spectroscopic survey with the VLA 3 GHz dataset. The LEGA-C continuum spectra reveal for the first time stellar velocity dispersions and age indicators of z $\sim$ 1 radio galaxies. We find that $z\sim 1$ radio-loud AGN occur exclusively in predominantly old galaxies with high velocity dispersions: $\sigma_*>$ 175 km s$^{-1}$, corresponding to black hole masses in excess of $10^8$ M$_{\odot}$. Furthermore, we confirm that at a fixed stellar mass the fraction of radio-loud AGN at z $\sim$ 1 is 5 - 10 times higher than in the local universe, suggesting that quiescent, massive galaxies at z $\sim$ 1 switch on as radio AGN on average once every Gyr. Our results strengthen the existing evidence for a link between high black-hole masses, radio loudness and quiescence at z $\sim$ 1.
  • We explore observational and theoretical constraints on how galaxies might transition between the "star-forming main sequence" (SFMS) and varying "degrees of quiescence" out to $z=3$. Our analysis is focused on galaxies with stellar mass $M_*>10^{10}M_{\odot}$, and is enabled by GAMA and CANDELS observations, a semi-analytic model (SAM) of galaxy formation, and a cosmological hydrodynamical "zoom in" simulation with momentum-driven AGN feedback. In both the observations and the SAM, transition galaxies tend to have intermediate S\'ersic indices, half-light radii, and surface stellar mass densities compared to star-forming and quiescent galaxies out to $z=3$. We place an observational upper limit on the average population transition timescale as a function of redshift, finding that the average high-redshift galaxy is on a "fast track" for quenching whereas the average low-redshift galaxy is on a "slow track" for quenching. We qualitatively identify four physical origin scenarios for transition galaxies in the SAM: oscillations on the SFMS, slow quenching, fast quenching, and rejuvenation. Quenching timescales in both the SAM and the hydrodynamical simulation are not fast enough to reproduce the quiescent population that we observe at $z\sim3$. In the SAM, we do not find a clear-cut morphological dependence of quenching timescales, but we do predict that the mean stellar ages, cold gas fractions, SMBH masses, and halo masses of transition galaxies tend to be intermediate relative to those of star-forming and quiescent galaxies at $z<3$.
  • We explore empirical constraints on the statistical relationship between the radial size of galaxies and the radius of their host dark matter halos from $z\sim 0.1$--3 using the GAMA and CANDELS surveys. We map dark matter halo mass to galaxy stellar mass using relationships from abundance matching, applied to the Bolshoi-Planck dissipationless N-body simulation. We define SRHR$\equiv r_e/R_h$ as the ratio of galaxy radius to halo virial radius, and SRHR$\lambda \equiv r_e/(\lambda R_h)$ as the ratio of galaxy radius to halo spin parameter times halo radius. At $z\sim 0.1$, we find an average value of SRHR $\simeq 0.018$ and SRHR$\lambda \simeq 0.5$ with very little dependence on stellar mass. SRHR and SRHR$\lambda$ have a weak dependence on cosmic time since $z\sim 3$. SRHR shows a mild decrease over cosmic time for low mass galaxies, but increases slightly or does not evolve for more massive galaxies. We find hints that at high redshift ($z\sim 2$--3), SRHR$\lambda$ is lower for more massive galaxies, while it shows no significant dependence on stellar mass at $z\lesssim 0.5$. We find that for both the GAMA and CANDELS samples, at all redshifts from $z\sim 0.1$--3, the observed conditional size distribution in stellar mass bins is remarkably similar to the conditional distribution of $\lambda R_h$. We discuss the physical interpretation and implications of these results.
  • We derive relations between the effective radii $R_{\rm{eff}}$ of galaxies and the virial radii $R_{200c}$ of their dark matter halos over the redshift range $0 < z < 3$. For galaxies, we use the measured sizes from deep images taken with \emph{Hubble Space Telescope} for the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey; for halos, we use the inferred sizes from abundance matching to cosmological dark matter simulations via a stellar mass--halo mass (SMHM) relation. For this purpose, we derive a new SMHM relation based on the same selection criteria and other assumptions as for our sample of galaxies with size measurements. As a check on the robustness of our results, we also derive $R_{\rm{eff}}$--$R_{200c}$ relations for three independent SMHM relations from the literature. We find that galaxy $R_{\rm{eff}}$ is proportional on average to halo $R_{200c}$, confirming and extending to high redshifts the $z=0$ results of Kravtsov. Late-type galaxies (with low S\'ersic index and high specific star formation rate [sSFR]) follow a linear $R_{\rm{eff}}$--$R_{200c}$ relation, with effective radii at $0.5 < z < 3$ close to those predicted by simple models of disk formation; at $z < 0.5$, the sizes of late-type galaxies appear to be slightly below this prediction. Early-type galaxies (with high S\'ersic index and low sSFR) follow a roughly parallel $R_{\rm{eff}}$--$R_{200c}$ relation, $\sim$ 0.2--0.3 dex below the one for late-type galaxies. Our observational results, reinforced by recent hydrodynamical simulations, indicate that galaxies grow quasi-homologously with their dark matter halos.
  • We present a 0.4-8$\mu$m multi-wavelength photometric catalog in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS) field. This catalog is built on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFC3 and ACS data from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS), and it incorporates the existing HST data from the All-wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey (AEGIS) and the 3D-HST program. The catalog is based on detections in the F160W band reaching a depth of F160W=26.62 AB (90% completeness, point-sources). It includes the photometry for 41457 objects over an area of $\approx 206$ arcmin$^2$ in the following bands: HST ACS F606W and F814W; HST WFC3 F125W, F140W and F160W; CFHT/Megacam $u^*$, $g'$, $r'$, $i'$ and $z'$; CFHT/WIRCAM $J$, $H$ and $K_\mathrm{S}$; Mayall/NEWFIRM $J1$, $J2$, $J3$, $H1$, $H2$, $K$; Spitzer IRAC $3.6\mu$m, $4.5\mu$m, $5.8\mu$m and $8.0\mu$m. We are also releasing value-added catalogs that provide robust photometric redshifts and stellar mass measurements. The catalogs are publicly available through the CANDELS repository.
  • In this paper, we investigate the relationship between star formation and structure, using a mass-complete sample of 27,893 galaxies at $0.5<z<2.5$ selected from 3D-HST. We confirm that star-forming galaxies are larger than quiescent galaxies at fixed stellar mass (M$_{\star}$). However, in contrast with some simulations, there is only a weak relation between star formation rate (SFR) and size within the star-forming population: when dividing into quartiles based on residual offsets in SFR, we find that the sizes of star-forming galaxies in the lowest quartile are 0.27$\pm$0.06 dex smaller than the highest quartile. We show that 50% of star formation in galaxies at fixed M$_{\star}$ takes place within a narrow range of sizes (0.26 dex). Taken together, these results suggest that there is an abrupt cessation of star formation after galaxies attain particular structural properties. Confirming earlier results, we find that central stellar density within a 1 kpc fixed physical radius is the key parameter connecting galaxy morphology and star formation histories: galaxies with high central densities are red and have increasingly lower SFR/M$_{\star}$, whereas galaxies with low central densities are blue and have a roughly constant (higher) SFR/M$_{\star}$ at a given redshift. We find remarkably little scatter in the average trends and a strong evolution of $>$0.5 dex in the central density threshold correlated with quiescence from $z\sim0.7-2.0$. Neither a compact size nor high-$n$ are sufficient to assess the likelihood of quiescence for the average galaxy; rather, the combination of these two parameters together with M$_{\star}$ results in a unique quenching threshold in central density/velocity.
  • In this paper we use ASPECS, the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the {\em Hubble} Ultra Deep Field (UDF) in band 3 and band 6, to place blind constraints on the CO luminosity function and the evolution of the cosmic molecular gas density as a function of redshift up to $z\sim 4.5$. This study is based on galaxies that have been solely selected through their CO emission and not through any other property. In all of the redshift bins the ASPECS measurements reach the predicted `knee' of the CO luminosity function (around $5\times10^{9}$ K km/s pc$^2$). We find clear evidence of an evolution in the CO luminosity function with respect to $z\sim 0$, with more CO luminous galaxies present at $z\sim 2$. The observed galaxies at $z\sim 2$ also appear more gas-rich than predicted by recent semi-analytical models. The comoving cosmic molecular gas density within galaxies as a function of redshift shows a factor 3-10 drop from $z \sim 2$ to $z \sim 0$ (with significant error bars), and possibly a decline at $z>3$. This trend is similar to the observed evolution of the cosmic star formation rate density. The latter therefore appears to be at least partly driven by the increased availability of molecular gas reservoirs at the peak of cosmic star formation ($z\sim2$).
  • We study the molecular gas properties of high-$z$ galaxies observed in the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey (ASPECS) that targets a $\sim1$ arcmin$^2$ region in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF), a blind survey of CO emission (tracing molecular gas) in the 3mm and 1mm bands. Of a total of 1302 galaxies in the field, 56 have spectroscopic redshifts and correspondingly well-defined physical properties. Among these, 11 have infrared luminosities $L_{\rm{}IR}>10^{11}$ L$_\odot$, i.e. a detection in CO emission was expected. Out these, 7 are detected at various significance in CO, and 4 are undetected in CO emission. In the CO-detected sources, we find CO excitation conditions that are lower than typically found in starburst/SMG/QSO environments. We use the CO luminosities (including limits for non-detections) to derive molecular gas masses. We discuss our findings in context of previous molecular gas observations at high redshift (star-formation law, gas depletion times, gas fractions): The CO-detected galaxies in the UDF tend to reside on the low-$L_{\rm{}IR}$ envelope of the scatter in the $L_{\rm{}IR}-L'_{\rm{}CO}$ relation, but exceptions exist. For the CO-detected sources, we find an average depletion time of $\sim$ 1 Gyr, with significant scatter. The average molecular-to-stellar mass ratio ($M_{\rm{}H2}$/$M_*$) is consistent with earlier measurements of main sequence galaxies at these redshifts, and again shows large variations among sources. In some cases, we also measure dust continuum emission. On average, the dust-based estimates of the molecular gas are a factor $\sim$2-5$\times$ smaller than those based on CO. Accounting for detections as well as non-detections, we find large diversity in the molecular gas properties of the high-redshift galaxies covered by ASPECS.
  • We present the rationale for and the observational description of ASPECS: The ALMA SPECtroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (UDF), the cosmological deep field that has the deepest multi-wavelength data available. Our overarching goal is to obtain an unbiased census of molecular gas and dust continuum emission in high-redshift (z$>$0.5) galaxies. The $\sim$1$'$ region covered within the UDF was chosen to overlap with the deepest available imaging from HST. Our ALMA observations consist of full frequency scans in band 3 (84-115 GHz) and band 6 (212-272 GHz) at approximately uniform line sensitivity ($L'_{\rm CO}\sim$2$\times$10$^{9}$ K km/s pc$^2$), and continuum noise levels of 3.8 $\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ and 12.7 $\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$, respectively. The molecular surveys cover the different rotational transitions of the CO molecule, leading to essentially full redshift coverage. The [CII] emission line is also covered at redshifts $6.0<z<8.0$. We present a customized algorithm to identify line candidates in the molecular line scans, and quantify our ability to recover artificial sources from our data. Based on whether multiple CO lines are detected, and whether optical spectroscopic redshifts as well as optical counterparts exist, we constrain the most likely line identification. We report 10 (11) CO line candidates in the 3mm (1mm) band, and our statistical analysis shows that $<$4 of these (in each band) are likely spurious. Less than 1/3 of the total CO flux in the low-J CO line candidates are from sources that are not associated with an optical/NIR counterpart. We also present continuum maps of both the band 3 and band 6 observations. The data presented here form the basis of a number of dedicated studies that are presented in subsequent papers.
  • We present an overview of the "KIFF" project, which provides ultra-deep Ks-band imaging of all six of the Hubble Frontier Fields clusters Abell 2744, MACS-0416, Abell S1063, Abell 370, MACS-0717 and MACS-1149. All of these fields have recently been observed with large allocations of Directors' Discretionary Time with the HST and Spitzer telescopes covering 0.4 < lambda < 1.6 microns and 3.6--4.5 microns, respectively. VLT/HAWK-I integrations of the first four fields reach 5-sigma limiting depths of Ks~26.0 (AB, point sources) and have excellent image quality (FWHM ~ 0."4). Shorter Keck/MOSFIRE integrations of the MACS-0717 (MACS-1149) field better observable in the north reach limiting depths Ks=25.5 (25.1) with seeing FWHM ~0."4 (0."5). In all cases the Ks-band mosaics cover the primary cluster and parallel HST/ACS+WFC3 fields. The total area of the Ks-band coverage is 490 arcmin^2. The Ks-band at 2.2 microns crucially fills the gap between the reddest HST filter (1.6 micron ~ H-band) and the IRAC 3.6 micron passband. While reaching the full depths of the space-based imaging is not currently feasible from the ground, the deep Ks-band images provide important constraints on both the redshifts and the stellar population properties of galaxies extending well below the characteristic stellar mass across most of the age of the universe, down to, and including, the redshifts of the targeted galaxy clusters (z < 0.5).
  • We present a new technique for wide and shallow observations using the near-infrared channel of Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Wide-field near-IR surveys with HST are generally inefficient, as guide star acquisitions make it impractical to observe more than one pointing per orbit. This limitation can be circumvented by guiding with gyros alone, which is possible as long as the telescope has three functional gyros. The method presented here allows us to observe mosaics of eight independent WFC3-IR pointings in a single orbit by utilizing the fact that HST drifts by only a very small amount in the 25 seconds between non-destructive reads of unguided exposures. By shifting the reads and treating them as independent exposures the full resolution of WFC3 can be restored. We use this "drift and shift" (DASH) method in the Cycle 23 COSMOS-DASH program, which will obtain 456 WFC3 $H_{160}$ pointings in 57 orbits, covering an area of 0.6 degree$^2$ in the COSMOS field down to $H_{160} = 25$. When completed, the program will more than triple the area of extra-galactic survey fields covered by near-IR imaging at HST resolution. We demonstrate the viability of the method with the first four orbits (32 pointings) of this program. We show that the resolution of the WFC3 camera is preserved, and that structural parameters of galaxies are consistent with those measured in guided observations.
  • We present the relation between galaxy structure and spectral type, using a K-selected galaxy sample at 0.5<z<2.0. Based on similarities between the UV-to-NIR spectral energy distributions, we classify galaxies into 32 spectral types. The different types span a wide range in evolutionary phases, and thus -- in combination with available CANDELS/F160W imaging -- are ideal to study the structural evolution of galaxies. Effective radii (R_e) and Sersic parameters (n) have been measured for 572 individual galaxies, and for each type, we determine R_e at fixed stellar mass by correcting for the mass-size relation. We use the rest-frame U-V vs. V-J diagram to investigate evolutionary trends. When moving into the direction perpendicular to the star-forming sequence, in which we see the Halpha equivalent width and the specific star formation rate (sSFR) decrease, we find a decrease in R_e and an increase in n. On the quiescent sequence we find an opposite trend, with older redder galaxies being larger. When splitting the sample into redshift bins, we find that young post-starburst galaxies are most prevalent at z>1.5 and significantly smaller than all other galaxy types at the same redshift. This result suggests that the suppression of star formation may be associated with significant structural evolution at z>1.5. At z<1, galaxy types with intermediate sSFRs (10^{-11.5}-10^{-10.5} yr^-1) do not have post-starburst SED shapes. These galaxies have similar sizes as older quiescent galaxies, implying that they can passively evolve onto the quiescent sequence, without increasing the average size of the quiescent galaxy population.
  • We present reduced data and data products from the 3D-HST survey, a 248-orbit HST Treasury program. The survey obtained WFC3 G141 grism spectroscopy in four of the five CANDELS fields: AEGIS, COSMOS, GOODS-S, and UDS, along with WFC3 $H_{140}$ imaging, parallel ACS G800L spectroscopy, and parallel $I_{814}$ imaging. In a previous paper (Skelton et al. 2014) we presented photometric catalogs in these four fields and in GOODS-N, the fifth CANDELS field. Here we describe and present the WFC3 G141 spectroscopic data, again augmented with data from GO-1600 in GOODS-N. The data analysis is complicated by the fact that no slits are used: all objects in the WFC3 field are dispersed, and many spectra overlap. We developed software to automatically and optimally extract interlaced 2D and 1D spectra for all objects in the Skelton et al. (2014) photometric catalogs. The 2D spectra and the multi-band photometry were fit simultaneously to determine redshifts and emission line strengths, taking the morphology of the galaxies explicitly into account. The resulting catalog has 98,663 measured redshifts and line strengths down to $JH_{IR}\leq 26$ and 22,548 with $JH_{IR}\leq 24$, where we comfortably detect continuum emission. Of this sample 5,459 galaxies are at $z>1.5$ and 9,621 are at $0.7<z<1.5$, where H$\alpha$ falls in the G141 wavelength coverage. Based on comparisons with ground-based spectroscopic redshifts, and on analyses of paired galaxies and repeat observations, the typical redshift error for $JH_{IR}\leq 24$ galaxies in our catalog is $\sigma_z \approx 0.003 \times (1+z)$, i.e., one native WFC3 pixel. The $3\sigma$ limit for emission line fluxes of point sources is $1.5\times10^{-17}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$. We show various representations of the full dataset, as well as individual examples that highlight the range of spectra that we find in the survey.
  • In this paper we study a key phase in the formation of massive galaxies: the transition of star forming galaxies into massive (M_stars~10^11 Msun), compact (r_e~1 kpc) quiescent galaxies, which takes place from z~3 to z~1.5. We use HST grism redshifts and extensive photometry in all five 3D-HST/CANDELS fields, more than doubling the area used previously for such studies, and combine these data with Keck MOSFIRE and NIRSPEC spectroscopy. We first confirm that a population of massive, compact, star forming galaxies exists at z~2, using K-band spectroscopy of 25 of these objects at 2.0<z<2.5. They have a median NII/Halpha ratio of 0.6, are highly obscured with SFR(tot)/SFR(Halpha)~10, and have a large range of observed line widths. We infer from the kinematics and spatial distribution of Halpha that the galaxies have rotating disks of ionized gas that are a factor of ~2 more extended than the stellar distribution. By combining measurements of individual galaxies, we find that the kinematics are consistent with a nearly Keplerian fall-off from V_rot~500 km/s at 1 kpc to V_rot~250 km/s at 7 kpc, and that the total mass out to this radius is dominated by the dense stellar component. Next, we study the size and mass evolution of the progenitors of compact massive galaxies. Even though individual galaxies may have had complex histories with periods of compaction and mergers, we show that the population of progenitors likely followed a simple inside-out growth track in the size-mass plane of d(log r_e) ~ 0.3 d(log M_stars). This mode of growth gradually increases the stellar mass within a fixed physical radius, and galaxies quench when they reach a stellar density or velocity dispersion threshold. As shown in other studies, the mode of growth changes after quenching, as dry mergers take the galaxies on a relatively steep track in the size-mass plane.
  • It is well established that (1) star-forming galaxies follow a relation between their star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass (M$_{\star}$), the "star-formation sequence", and (2) the SFRs of galaxies correlate with their structure, where star-forming galaxies are less concentrated than quiescent galaxies at fixed mass. Here, we consider whether the scatter and slope of the star-formation sequence is correlated with systematic variations in the Sersic indices, $n$, of galaxies across the SFR-M$_{\star}$ plane. We use a mass-complete sample of 23,848 galaxies at $0.5<z<2.5$ selected from the 3D-HST photometric catalogs. Galaxy light profiles parameterized by $n$ are based on Hubble Space Telescope CANDELS near-infrared imaging. We use a single SFR indicator empirically-calibrated from stacks of Spitzer/MIPS 24$\mu$m imaging, adding the unobscured and obscured star formation. We find that the scatter of the star-formation sequence is related in part to galaxy structure; the scatter due to variations in $n$ at fixed mass for star-forming galaxies ranges from 0.14$\pm$0.02 dex at $z\sim2$ to 0.30$\pm$0.04 dex at $z<1$. While the slope of the log(SFR)-log(M$_{\star}$) relation is of order unity for disk-like galaxies, galaxies with $n>2$ (implying more dominant bulges) have significantly lower SFR/M$_{\star}$ than the main ridgeline of the star-formation sequence. These results suggest that bulges in massive $z\sim2$ galaxies are actively building up, where the stars in the central concentration are relatively young. At $z<1$, the presence of older bulges within star-forming galaxies lowers global SFR/M$_{\star}$, decreasing the slope and contributing significantly to the scatter of the star-formation sequence.
  • We present Ha maps at 1kpc spatial resolution for star-forming galaxies at z~1, made possible by the WFC3 grism on HST. Employing this capability over all five 3D-HST/CANDELS fields provides a sample of 2676 galaxies. By creating deep stacked Halpha (Ha) images, we reach surface brightness limits of 1x10^-18\erg\s\cm^2\arcsec^2, allowing us to map the distribution of ionized gas out to >10kpc for typical L* galaxies at this epoch. We find that the spatial extent of the Ha distribution increases with stellar mass as r(Ha)[kpc]=1.5(Mstars/10^10Msun)^0.23. Furthermore, the Ha emission is more extended than the stellar continuum emission, consistent with inside-out assembly of galactic disks. This effect, however, is mass dependent with r(Ha)/r(stars)=1.1(M/10^10Msun)^0.054, such that at low masses r(Ha)~r(stars). We map the Ha distribution as a function of SFR(IR+UV) and find evidence for `coherent star formation' across the SFR-M plane: above the main sequence, Ha is enhanced at all radii; below the main sequence, Ha is depressed at all radii. This suggests that at all masses the physical processes driving the enhancement or suppression of star formation act throughout the disks of galaxies. It also confirms that the scatter in the star forming main sequence is real and caused by variations in the star formation rate at fixed mass. At high masses (10^10.5<M/Msun<10^11), above the main sequence, Ha is particularly enhanced in the center, plausibly building bulges and/or supermassive black holes. Below the main sequence, the star forming disks are more compact and a strong central dip in the EW(Ha), and the inferred specific star formation rate, appears. Importantly though, across the entirety of the SFR-M plane, the absolute star formation rate as traced by Ha is always centrally peaked, even in galaxies below the main sequence.