• Asteroseismic parameters allow us to measure the basic stellar properties of field giants observed far across the Galaxy. Most of such determinations are, up to now, based on simple scaling relations involving the large frequency separation, \Delta\nu, and the frequency of maximum power, \nu$_{max}$. In this work, we implement \Delta\nu\ and the period spacing, {\Delta}P, computed along detailed grids of stellar evolutionary tracks, into stellar isochrones and hence in a Bayesian method of parameter estimation. Tests with synthetic data reveal that masses and ages can be determined with typical precision of 5 and 19 per cent, respectively, provided precise seismic parameters are available. Adding independent information on the stellar luminosity, these values can decrease down to 3 and 10 per cent respectively. The application of these methods to NGC 6819 giants produces a mean age in agreement with those derived from isochrone fitting, and no evidence of systematic differences between RGB and RC stars. The age dispersion of NGC 6819 stars, however, is larger than expected, with at least part of the spread ascribable to stars that underwent mass-transfer events.
  • Low-mass stars in the He-core-burning phase (HeCB) play a major role in stellar, galactic, and extragalactic astrophysics. The ability to predict accurately the properties of these stars, however, depends on our understanding of convection, which remains one of the key open questions in stellar modelling. We argue that the combination of the luminosity of the AGB bump (AGBb) and the period spacing of gravity modes (DP) during the HeCB phase, provides us with a decisive test to discriminate between competing models of these stars. We use the MESA, BaSTI, and PARSEC stellar evolution codes to model a typical giant star observed by Kepler. We explore how various near-core-mixing scenarios affect the predictions of the above-mentioned constraints, and we find that DP depends strongly on the prescription adopted. Moreover we show that the detailed behaviour of DP shows the signature of sharp variations in the Brunt-Vaisala frequency, which could potentially give additional information about near-core features. We find evidence for the AGBb among Kepler targets, and a first comparison with observations shows that, even if standard models are able to reproduce the luminosity distribution, no standard model can account for satisfactorily the period spacing of HeCB stars. Our analysis allows us to outline a candidate model to describe simultaneously the two observed distributions: a model with a moderate overshooting region characterized by an adiabatic thermal stratification. This prescription will be tested in the future on cluster stars, to limit possible observational biases.
  • Stellar conditions leading to a possible semi-convective mixing are discussed in three relevant cases: (1) low mass MS stars in which the CNO cycle takes progressively the lead over the PP chain due to the increase in temperature as core hydrogen burning proceeds, (2) massive MS stars which experience a large contri- bution of the radiation pressure to the total pressure and (3) core helium burning stars for which the production of carbon in the core increases the opacity. A short discussion of semi-convection in terms of instability of non radial modes follows.
  • The efficiency of convection in stars affects many aspects of their evolution and remains one of the key-open questions in stellar modelling. In particular, the size of the mixed core in core-He-burning low-mass stars is still uncertain and impacts the lifetime of this evolutionary phase and, e.g., the C/O profile in white dwarfs. One of the known observables related to the Horizontal Branch (HB) and Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) evolution is the AGB bump. Its luminosity depends on the position in mass of the helium-burning shell at its first ignition, that is affected by the extension of the central mixed region. In this preliminary work we show how various assumptions on near-core mixing and on the thermal stratification in the overshooting region affect the luminosity of the AGB bump, as well as the period spacing of gravity modes in core-He-burning models.
  • Numerous physical aspects of stellar physics have been presented in Ses- sion 2 and the underlying uncertainties have been tentatively assessed. We try here to highlight some specific points raised after the talks and during the general discus- sion at the end of the session and eventually at the end of the workshop. A table of model uncertainties is then drawn with the help of the participants in order to give the state of the art in stellar modeling uncertainties as of July 2013.
  • Since the detection of non-radial solar-like oscillation modes in red giants with the CoRoT satellite, the interest in the asteroseismic properties of red giants and the link with their global properties and internal structure is increasing. Moreover, more and more precise data are being collected with the space-based telescopes CoRoT and {\it Kepler}. Particularly relevant has been the detection of mixed modes in a large number of G-K red giants. In this contribution we discuss the potential of these dipole mixed modes to provide information on core extra-mixing and transport of angular momentum.
  • The era of detailed asteroseismic analyses opened by space missions such as CoRoT and $\textit{Kepler}$ has highlighted the need for stellar models devoid of numerical inaccuracies, in order to be able to diagnose which physical aspects are being ignored or poorly treated in standard stellar modeling. We tackle here the important problem of fixing convective zones boundaries in the frame of the local mixing length theory. First we show that the only correct way to locate a convective zone boundary is to find, at each iteration step, through interpolations or extrapolations from points $\textit{within the convective zone}$, the mass where the radiative luminosity is equal to the total one. We then discuss two misuses of the boundary condition and the way they affect stellar modeling and stellar evolution. The first one consists in applying the neutrality condition for convective instability on the $\textit{radiative}$ side of the convective boundary. The second way of misusing the boundary condition comes from the process of fixing the convective boundary through the search for a change of sign of a possibly \textit{discontinuous} function. We show that these misuses can lead to completely wrong estimates of convective core sizes with important consequences for the following evolutionary phases. We point out the advantages of using a double mesh point at each convective zone boundaries. The specific problem of a convective shell is discussed and some remarks concerning overshooting are given.
  • We give here the Table of Contents of the proceedings from the workshop "Red Giants as Probes of the Structure and Evolution of the Milky Way", held in Roma, 15-17 November 2010. Exciting results are blooming, thanks to a convergence between unprecedented asteroseismic data obtained by the satellites CoRoT and Kepler, and state-of-the-art models of the internal structure of red giants and of galactic evolution. The pulsation properties now available for thousands of red giants promise to add valuable and independent constraints to current models of structure and evolution of our galaxy. Such a close connection between these domains opens a new very promising gate in our understanding of stars and galaxies. Scientists specialised in galactic evolution, in stellar structure, and in asteroseismology, gathered together in this workshop to discuss the current status and uncertainties involved in modelling the structure and evolution of red giants, as well as open questions regarding the study of stellar populations in the Milky Way.
  • Red giants are evolved stars that have exhausted the supply of hydrogen in their cores and instead burn hydrogen in a surrounding shell. Once a red giant is sufficiently evolved, the helium in the core also undergoes fusion. Outstanding issues in our understanding of red giants include uncertainties in the amount of mass lost at the surface before helium ignition and the amount of internal mixing from rotation and other processes. Progress is hampered by our inability to distinguish between red giants burning helium in the core and those still only burning hydrogen in a shell. Asteroseismology offers a way forward, being a powerful tool for probing the internal structures of stars using their natural oscillation frequencies. Here we report observations of gravity-mode period spacings in red giants that permit a distinction between evolutionary stages to be made. We use high-precision photometry obtained with the Kepler spacecraft over more than a year to measure oscillations in several hundred red giants. We find many stars whose dipole modes show sequences with approximately regular period spacings. These stars fall into two clear groups, allowing us to distinguish unambiguously between hydrogen-shell-burning stars (period spacing mostly about 50 seconds) and those that are also burning helium (period spacing about 100 to 300 seconds).
  • Asteroseismology of stars in clusters has been a long-sought goal because the assumption of a common age, distance and initial chemical composition allows strong tests of the theory of stellar evolution. We report results from the first 34 days of science data from the Kepler Mission for the open cluster NGC 6819 -- one of four clusters in the field of view. We obtain the first clear detections of solar-like oscillations in the cluster red giants and are able to measure the large frequency separation and the frequency of maximum oscillation power. We find that the asteroseismic parameters allow us to test cluster-membership of the stars, and even with the limited seismic data in hand, we can already identify four possible non-members despite their having a better than 80% membership probability from radial velocity measurements. We are also able to determine the oscillation amplitudes for stars that span about two orders of magnitude in luminosity and find good agreement with the prediction that oscillation amplitudes scale as the luminosity to the power of 0.7. These early results demonstrate the unique potential of asteroseismology of the stellar clusters observed by Kepler.
  • Saio et al. (2006) have shown that the presence of an intermediate convective zone (ICZ) in post-main sequence models could prevent the propagation of g-modes in the radiative interior and hence avoid the corresponding radiative damping. The development of such a convective region highly depends on the structure of the star in the mu-gradient region surrounding the convective core during the main sequence phase. In particular,the development of this ICZ depends on physical processes such as mass loss, overshooting (Chiosi & Maeder 1986, Chiosi et al. 1992, see also Godart et al., these proceedings) and convective instability criterion (Schwarzschild's or Ledoux's criteria). In this paper we study the consequences of adopting the Ledoux's criterion on the evolution of the convective regions in massive stars (15 and 20 Msun), and on the pulsation spectrum of these new B-type variables (also called SPBsg).
  • This contribution is not about the quality of the agreement between stellar models computed by CESAM and CLES codes, but more interesting, on what ESTA-Task~1 run has taught us about these codes and about the input physics they use. We also quantify the effects of different implementations of the same physics on the seismic properties of the stellar models, that in fact is the main aim of ESTA experiments.