• We investigate the dynamics of single- and multi-photon emission from detuned strongly coupled systems based on the quantum-dot-photonic-crystal resonator platform. Transmitting light through such systems can generate a range of non-classical states of light with tunable photon counting statistics due to the nonlinear ladder of hybridized light-matter states. By controlling the detuning between emitter and resonator, the transmission can be tuned to strongly enhance either single- or two-photon emission processes. Despite the strongly-dissipative nature of these systems, we find that by utilizing a self-homodyne interference technique combined with frequency-filtering we are able to find a strong two-photon component of the emission in the multi-photon regime. In order to explain our correlation measurements, we propose rate equation models that capture the dominant processes of emission both in the single- and multi-photon regimes. These models are then supported by quantum-optical simulations that fully capture the frequency filtering of emission from our solid-state system.
  • Despite tremendous advances in the fundamentals and applications of cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED), investigations in this field have primarily been limited to optical cavities composed of purely dielectric materials. Here, we demonstrate a hybrid metal-dielectric nanocavity design and realize it in the InAs/GaAs quantum photonics platform utilizing angled rotational metal evaporation. Key features of our nanometallic light-matter interface include: (i) order of magnitude reduction in mode volume compared to that of leading photonic crystal CQED systems; (ii) surface-emitting nanoscale cylindrical geometry and therefore good collection efficiency; and finally (iii) strong and broadband spontaneous emission rate enhancement (Purcell factor ~ 8) of single photons. This light-matter interface may play an important role in quantum technologies.
  • The rapid generation of non-classical light serves as the foundation for exploring quantum optics and developing applications such as secure communication or generation of NOON-states. While strongly coupled quantum dot-photonic crystal resonator systems have great potential as non-classical light sources due to their promise of tailored output statistics, the generation of indistinguishable photons has been obscured due to the strongly dissipative nature of such systems. Here, we demonstrate that the recently discovered self-homodyne suppression technique can be used to overcome this limitation and tune the quantum statistics of transmitted light, achieving indistinguishable photon emission competitive with state-of-the-art metrics. Furthermore, our nanocavity-based platform directly lends itself to scalable on-chip architectures for quantum information.
  • The study of light-matter interaction at the quantum scale has been enabled by the cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) architecture, in which a quantum two-level system strongly couples to a single cavity mode. Originally implemented with atoms in optical cavities, CQED effects are now also observed with artificial atoms in solid-state environments. Such realizations of these systems exhibit fast dynamics, which makes them attractive candidates for devices including modulators and sources in high-throughput communications. However, these systems possess large photon out-coupling rates that obscure any quantum behavior at large excitation powers. Here, we have utilised a self-homodyning interferometric technique that fully employs the complex mode structure of our nanofabricated cavity to observe a quantum phenomenon known as the dynamic Mollow triplet. We expect this interference to facilitate the development of arbitrary on-chip quantum state generators, thereby strongly influencing quantum lithography, metrology, and imaging.
  • Strongly coupled quantum dot-cavity systems provide a non-linear configuration of hybridized light-matter states with promising quantum-optical applications. Here, we investigate the coherent interaction between strong laser pulses and quantum dot-cavity polaritons. Resonant excitation of polaritonic states and their interaction with phonons allow us to observe coherent Rabi oscillations and Ramsey fringes. Furthermore, we demonstrate complete coherent control of a quantum dot-photonic crystal cavity based quantum-bit. By controlling the excitation power and phase in a two-pulse excitation scheme we achieve access to the full Bloch sphere. Quantum-optical simulations are in good agreement with our experiments and provide insight into the decoherence mechanisms.
  • We investigate the influence of exciton-phonon coupling on the dynamics of a strongly coupled quantum dot-photonic crystal cavity system and explore the effects of this interaction on different schemes for non-classical light generation. By performing time-resolved measurements, we map out the detuning-dependent polariton lifetime and extract the spectrum of the polariton-to-phonon coupling with unprecedented precision. Photon-blockade experiments for different pulse-length and detuning conditions (supported by quantum optical simulations) reveal that achieving high-fidelity photon blockade requires an intricate understanding of the phonons' influence on the system dynamics. Finally, we achieve direct coherent control of the polariton states of a strongly coupled system and demonstrate that their efficient coupling to phonons can be exploited for novel concepts in high-fidelity single photon generation.
  • The on-chip generation of non-classical states of light is a key-requirement for future optical quantum hardware. In solid-state cavity quantum electrodynamics, such non-classical light can be generated from self-assembled quantum dots strongly coupled to photonic crystal cavities. Their anharmonic strong light-matter interaction results in large optical nonlinearities at the single photon level, where the admission of a single photon into the cavity may enhance (photon-tunnelling) or diminish (photon-blockade) the probability for a second photon to enter the cavity. Here, we demonstrate that detuning the cavity and QD resonances enables the generation of high-purity non-classical light from strongly coupled systems. For specific detunings we show that not only the purity but also the efficiency of single-photon generation increases significantly, making high-quality single-photon generation by photon-blockade possible with current state-of-the-art samples.
  • We use the third- and fourth-order autocorrelation functions $g^{(3)}(\tau_1,\tau_2)$ and $g^{(4)}(\tau_1,\tau_2, \tau_3)$ to detect the non-classical character of the light transmitted through a photonic-crystal nanocavity containing a strongly-coupled quantum dot probed with a train of coherent light pulses. We contrast the value of $g^{(3)}(0, 0)$ with the conventionally used $g^{(2)}(0)$ and demonstrate that in addition to being necessary for detecting two-photon states emitted by a low-intensity source, $g^{(3)}$ provides a more clear indication of the non-classical character of a light source. We also present preliminary data that demonstrates bunching in the fourth-order autocorrelation function $g^{(4)}(\tau_1,\tau_2, \tau_3)$ as the first step toward detecting three-photon states.
  • We propose a new type of bistable device for silicon photonics, using the self-electro-optic effect within an optical cavity. Since the bistability does not depend on the intrinsic optical nonlinearity of the material, but is instead engineered by means of an optoelectronic feedback, it appears at low optical powers. This bistable device satisfies all the basic criteria required in an optical switch to build a scalable digital optical computing system.
  • We present the design, fabrication, and characterization of high quality factor and small mode volume planar photonic crystal cavities from cubic (3C) thin films (thickness ~ 200 nm) of silicon carbide (SiC) grown epitaxially on a silicon substrate. We demonstrate cavity resonances across the telecommunications band, with wavelengths from 1,250 - 1,600 nm. Finally, we discuss possible applications in nonlinear optics, optical interconnects, and quantum information science.
  • We demonstrate a novel method for deterministic charging of InAs quantum dots embedded in photonic crystal nanoresonators using a unique vertical p-n-i-n junction within the photonic crystal membrane. Charging is confirmed by the observation of Zeeman splitting for magnetic fields applied in the Voigt configuration. Spectrally resolved photoluminescence measurements are complemented by polarization resolved studies that show the precise structure of the Zeeman quadruplet. Integration of quantum dots in nanoresonators strongly enhances far-field collection efficiency and paves the way for the exploitation of enhanced spin-photon interactions for fabrication of efficient quantum nodes in a scalable solid state platform.
  • We propose a scheme to efficiently couple a single quantum dot electron spin to an optical nano-cavity, which enables us to simultaneously benefit from a cavity as an efficient photonic interface, as well as to perform high fidelity (nearly 100%) spin initialization and manipulation achievable in bulk semiconductors. Moreover, the presence of the cavity speeds up the spin initialization process beyond GHz.
  • We performed an experimental study of coupled optical cavity arrays in a photonic crystal platform. We find that the coupling between the cavities is significantly larger than the fabrication-induced disorder in the cavity frequencies. Satisfying this condition is necessary for using such cavity arrays to generate strongly correlated photons, which has potential application to the quantum simulation of many-body systems.
  • We demonstrate the effects of cavity quantum electrodynamics for a quantum dot coupled to a photonic molecule, consisting of a pair of coupled photonic crystal cavities. We show anti-crossing between the quantum dot and the two super-modes of the photonic molecule, signifying achievement of the strong coupling regime. From the anti-crossing data, we estimate the contributions of both mode-coupling and intrinsic detuning to the total detuning between the super-modes. Finally, we also show signatures of off-resonant cavity-cavity interaction in the photonic molecule.
  • We present experimental results showing phonon-mediated coupling between two quantum dots embedded inside a photonic crystal microcavity. With only one of the dots being spectrally close to the cavity, we observe both frequency up-conversion and down-conversion of the pump light via a $\sim1.2$ THz phonon. We demonstrate this process for both weak and strong regimes of dot-cavity coupling, and provide a simple theoretical model explaining our observations.
  • We propose an implementation of a source of strongly sub-Poissonian light in a system consisting of a quantum dot coupled to both modes of a lossy bimodal optical cavity. When one mode of the cavity is resonantly driven with coherent light, the system will act as an efficient photon number filter, and the transmitted light will have a strongly sub-Poissonian character. In addition to numerical simulations demonstrating this effect, we present a physical explanation of the underlying mechanism. In particular, we show that the effect results from an interference between the coherent light transmitted through the resonant cavity and the super-Poissonian light generated by photon-induced tunneling. Peculiarly, this effect vanishes in the absence of the cavity loss.
  • We demonstrate off-resonant coupling between a single quantum dot and a nanobeam photonic crystal cavity, under resonant excitation of the quantum dot or the cavity. These results are consistent with previous descriptions of off-resonant coupling as an incoherent phonon-mediated process. The extension of this phenomenon to a nanobeam photonic crystal cavity presents interesting possibilities for coherent control of this interaction by tailoring the phonon density of states.
  • We demonstrate the actuation of a double beam opto-mechanical cavity with a sinusoidally varying optical input power. We observe the driven mechanical motion with only 200 nW coupled to the optical cavity mode. We also investigate the pump power dependence of the radio-frequency response for both the driving power and the probe power. Finally, we investigate the dependence of the amplitude of the mechanical motion on mechanical cavity quality factor.