• Resonance is an ubiquitous phenomenon present in many systems. In particular, air resonance in cavities was studied by Hermann von Helmholtz in the 1850s. Originally used as acoustic filters, Helmholtz resonators are rigid-wall cavities which reverberate at given fixed frequencies. An adjustable type of resonator is the so-called universal Helmholtz resonator, a device consisting of two sliding cylinders capable of producing sounds over a continuous range of frequencies. Here we propose a simple experiment using a smartphone and normal bottle of tea, with a nearly uniform cylindrical section, which, filled with water at different levels, mimics a universal Helmholtz resonator. Blowing over the bottle, different sounds are produced. Taking advantage of the great processing capacity of smartphones, sound spectra together with frequencies of resonance are obtained in real time.
  • We describe a study on the conceptual difficulties faced by college students in understanding hydrodynamics of ideal fluids. This study was based on responses obtained in hundreds of written exams and oral interviews, which were held with first-year Engineering and Science university students. Their responses allowed us to identify a series of misconceptions unreported in the literature so far. The study findings demonstrate that the most important difficulties arise from the students' inability to establish a link between the kinematics and dynamics of moving fluids, and from a lack of understanding regarding how different regions of a system interact.
  • The spatial dependence of magnetic fields in simple configurations is an usual topic in introductory electromagnetism lessons, both in high school and in university courses. In typical experiments, magnetic fields are obtained taking point-by-point values using a Hall sensor and distances are measured using a ruler. Here, we show how to take advantage of the smartphone capabilities to get simultaneous measures with the built-in accelerometer and magnetometer and to obtain the spatial dependence of magnetic fields. We consider a simple set up consisting of a smartphone mounted on a track whose direction coincides with the axis of a coil. While the smartphone is smoothly accelerated, both the magnetic field and the distance from the center of the coil (integrated numerically from the acceleration values) are simultaneously obtained. This methodology can be easily extended to more complicated setups.
  • Originally an empirical law, nowadays Malus' law is seen as a key experiment to demonstrate the transverse nature of electromagnetic waves, as well as the intrinsic connection between optics and electromagnetism. In this work, a simple and inexpensive setup is proposed to quantitatively verify the nature of polarized light. A flat computer screen serves as a source of linear polarized light and a smartphone (possessing ambient light and orientation sensors) is used, thanks to its built-in sensors, to experiment with polarized light and verify the Malus' law.
  • We measure the vertical velocities of elevators, pedestrians climbing stairs, and drones (flying unmanned aerial vehicles), by means of smartphone pressure sensors. The barometric pressure obtained with the smartphone is related to the altitude of the device via the hydrostatic approximation. From the altitude values, vertical velocities are derived. The approximation considered is valid in the first hundred meters of the inner layers of the atmosphere. In addition to pressure, acceleration values were also recorded using the built-in accelerometer. Numerical integration was performed, obtaining both vertical velocity and altitude. We show that data obtained using the pressure sensor is significantly less noisy than that obtained using the accelerometer. Error accumulation is also evident in the numerical integration of the acceleration values. In the proposed experiments, the pressure sensor also outperforms GPS, because this sensor does not receive satellite signals indoors and, in general, the operating frequency is considerably lower than that of the pressure sensor. In the cases in which it is possible, comparison with reference values taken from the architectural plans of buildings validates the results obtained using the pressure sensor. This proposal is ideally performed as an external or outreach activity with students to gain insight about fundamental questions in mechanics, fluids, and thermodynamics.
  • The logistic map is a paradigmatic dynamical system originally conceived to model the discrete-time demographic growth of a population, which shockingly, shows that discrete chaos can emerge from trivial low-dimensional non-linear dynamics. In this work, we design and characterize a simple, low-cost, easy-to-handle, electronic implementation of the logistic map. In particular, our implementation allows for straightforward circuit-modifications to behave as different one-dimensional discrete-time systems. Also, we design a coupling block in order to address the behavior of two coupled maps, although, our design is unrestricted to the discrete-time system implementation and it can be generalized to handle coupling between many dynamical systems, as in a complex system. Our findings show that the isolated and coupled maps' behavior has a remarkable agreement between the experiments and the simulations, even when fine-tuning the parameters with a resolution of $\sim 10^{-3}$. We support these conclusions by comparing the Lyapunov exponents, periodicity of the orbits, and phase portraits of the numerical and experimental data for a wide range of coupling strengths and map's parameters.
  • The characteristics of the inner layer of the atmosphere, the troposphere, are determinant for the earth's life. In this experience we explore the first hundreds of meters using a smartphone mounted on a quadcopter. Both the altitude and the pressure are obtained using the smartphone's sensors. We complement these measures with data collected from the flight information system of an aircraft. The experimental results are compared with the International Standard Atmosphere and other simple approximations: isothermal and constant density atmospheres.
  • Remotely-controlled helicopters and planes have been used as toys for decades. However, only recently, advances in sensor technologies have made possible to easily flight and control theses devices at an affordable price. Along with their increasing availability the educational opportunities are also proliferating. Here, a simple experiment in which a smartphone is mounted on a quadcopter is proposed to investigate the basics of a flight. Thanks to the smartphone's built-in accelerometer and gyroscope, take off, landing and yaw are analyzed.
  • The Atwood machine is a simple device used for centuries to demonstrate the Newton's second law. It consists of two supports containing different masses joined by a string. Here, we propose an experiment in which a smartphone is fixed to one support. With the aid of the built-in accelerometer of the smartphone the vertical acceleration is registered. By redistributing the masses of the supports, a linear relationship between the mass difference and the vertical acceleration is obtained. In this experiment, the use of a smartphone contributes to enhance a classical demonstration.
  • Using a novel electronic implementation of a well-known time-delayed system, the Mackey-Glass (MG) system, we investigate the organization of the trajectories in the phase space, and classify the coexisting solutions, both, in observations and in model simulations. The numerical simultations are performed using a discrete-time equation that approximates the exact solutions of the MG model and in particular, models the delay line in the electronic circuit. In wide parameter regions, different periodic or aperiodic solutions, but with similar waveforms exhibiting the alternation of peaks of different amplitudes, coexist. A symbolic algorithm is proposed to classify those solutions. The system's phase-space was explored by varying the parameter values of two families of initial functions.
  • The role of intermediaries in the synchronization of small groups of light controlled oscillators (LCO) is addressed. A single LCO is a two-time-scale phase oscillator. When pulse-coupling two LCOs, the synchronization time decreases monotonously as the coupling strength increases, independent of the initial conditions and frequency detuning. In this work we study numerically the effects that a third LCO induces to the collective behavior of the system. We analyze the new system by dealing with directed heterogeneous couplings among the units. We report a novel and robust phenomenon, absent when coupling two LCOs, which consists of a discontinuous relationship between the synchronization time and coupling strength or initial conditions. The mechanism responsible for the appearance of such discontinuities is discussed.
  • The inference of an underlying network topology from local observations of a complex system composed of interacting units is usually attempted by using statistical similarity measures, such as Cross-Correlation (CC) and Mutual Information (MI). The possible existence of a direct link between different units is, however, hindered within the time-series measurements. Here we show that, for the class of systems studied, when an abrupt change in the ordered set of CC or MI values exists, it is possible to infer, without errors, the underlying network topology from the time-series measurements, even in the presence of observational noise, non-identical units, and coupling heterogeneity. We find that a necessary condition for the discontinuity to occur is that the dynamics of the coupled units is partially coherent, i.e., neither complete disorder nor globally synchronous patterns are present. We critically compare the inference methods based on CC and MI, in terms of how effective, robust, and reliable they are, and conclude that, in general, MI outperforms CC in robustness and reliability. Our findings could be relevant for the construction and interpretation of functional networks, such as those constructed from brain or climate data.
  • The celebrated Mackey-Glass model describes the dynamics of physiological \textit{delayed} systems in which the actual evolution depends on the values of the variables at some \textit{previous} times. This kind of systems are usually expressed by delayed differential equations which turn out to be infinite-dimensional. In this contribution, an electronic implementation mimicking the Mackey-Glass model is proposed. New approaches for both the nonlinear function and the delay block are made. Explicit equations for the actual evolution of the implementation are derived. Simulations of the original equation, the circuit equation, and experimental data show great concordance.
  • Acceleration sensors built into smartphones, i-pads or tablets can conveniently be used in the Physics laboratory. By virtue of the equivalence principle, a sensor fixed in a non-inertial reference frame cannot discern between a gravitational field and an accelerated system. Accordingly, acceleration values read by these sensors must be corrected for the gravitational component. A physical pendulum was studied by way of example, and absolute acceleration and rotation angle values were derived from the measurements made by the accelerometer and gyroscope. Results were corroborated by comparison with those obtained by video analysis. The limitations of different smartphone sensors are discussed.
  • We use ordinal patterns and symbolic analysis to construct global climate networks and uncover long and short term memory processes. The data analyzed is the monthly averaged surface air temperature (SAT field) and the results suggest that the time variability of the SAT field is determined by patterns of oscillatory behavior that repeat from time to time, with a periodicity related to intraseasonal oscillations and to El Ni\~{n}o on seasonal-to-interannual time scales.
  • The flow of a two--layer stratified fluid over an abrupt topographic obstacle, simulating relevant situations in oceanographic problems, is investigated numerically and experimentally in a simplified two--dimensional situation. Experimental results and numerical simulations are presented at low Froude numbers in a two-layer stratified flow and for two abrupt obstacles, semi--cylindrical and prismatic. We find four different regimes of the flow immediately past the obstacles: sub-critical (I), internal hydraulic jump (II), Kelvin-Helmholtz at the interface (III) and shedding of billows (IV). The critical condition for delimiting the experiments is obtained using the hydraulic theory. Moreover, the dependence of the critical Froude number on the geometry of the obstacle are investigated. The transition from regime III to regime IV is explained with a theoretical stability analysis. The results from the stability analysis are confirmed with the DPIV measurements. In regime (IV), when the velocity upstream is large enough, we find that Kelvin-Helmhotz instability of the jet produces shedding of billows. Important differences with flows like Von Karman's street are explained. Remarkable agreement between the experimental results and numerical simulations are obtained.
  • The effect of fixed cylindrical rods located at the centerline axis on vortex breakdown (VB) is studied experimentally and numerically. We find that the VB is enhanced for very small values of the rod radius $d$, while it is suppressed for values of $d$ beyond a critical value. In order to characterize this effect, the critical Reynolds number for the appearance of vortex breakdown as a function of the radius of the fixed rods and the different aspect ratios was accurately determined, using digital particle image velocimetry. The numerical and experimental results are compared showing an excellent agreement. In addition, a simple model in order to show that this effect also appears in open pipe flows is presented in the appendix.
  • We study a network of coupled logistic maps whose interactions occur with a certain distribution of delay times. The local dynamics is chaotic in the absence of coupling and thus the network is a paradigm of a complex system. There are two regimes of synchronization, depending on the distribution of delays: when the delays are sufficiently heterogeneous the network synchronizes on a steady-state (that is unstable for the uncoupled maps); when the delays are homogeneous, it synchronizes in a time-dependent state (that is either periodic or chaotic). Using two global indicators we quantify the synchronizability on the two regimes, focusing on the roles of the network connectivity and the topology. The connectivity is measured in terms of the average number of links per node, and we consider various topologies (scale-free, small-world, star, and nearest-neighbor with and without a central hub). With weak connectivity and weak coupling strength, the network displays an irregular oscillatory dynamics that is largely independent of the topology and of the delay distribution. With heterogeneous delays, we find a threshold connectivity level below which the network does not synchronize, regardless of the network size. This minimum average number of neighbors seems to be independent of the delay distribution. We also analyze the effect of self-feedback loops and find that they have an impact on the synchronizability of small networks with large coupling strengths. The influence of feedback, enhancing or degrading synchronization, depends on the topology and on the distribution of delays.
  • We review our recent work on the synchronization of a network of delay-coupled maps, focusing on the interplay of the network topology and the delay times that take into account the finite velocity of propagation of interactions. We assume that the elements of the network are identical ($N$ logistic maps in the regime where the individual maps, without coupling, evolve in a chaotic orbit) and that the coupling strengths are uniform throughout the network. We show that if the delay times are sufficiently heterogeneous, for adequate coupling strength the network synchronizes in a spatially homogeneous steady-state, which is unstable for the individual maps without coupling. This synchronization behavior is referred to as ``suppression of chaos by random delays'' and is in contrast with the synchronization when all the interaction delay times are homogeneous, because with homogeneous delays the network synchronizes in a state where the elements display in-phase time-periodic or chaotic oscillations. We analyze the influence of the network topology considering four different types of networks: two regular (a ring-type and a ring-type with a central node) and two random (free-scale Barabasi-Albert and small-world Newman-Watts). We find that when the delay times are sufficiently heterogeneous the synchronization behavior is largely independent of the network topology but depends on the networks connectivity, i.e., on the average number of neighbors per node.
  • This work is focused to study the development and control of the laminar vortex breakdown of a flow enclosed in a cylinder. We show that vortex breakdown can be controlled by the introduction of a small fixed rod in the axis of the cylinder. Our method to control the onset of vortex breakdown is simpler than those previously proposed, since it does not require any auxiliary device system. The effect of the fixed rods may be understood using a simple model based on the failure of the quasi-cylindrical approximation. We report experimental results of the critical Reynolds number for the appearance of vortex breakdown for different radius of the fixed rods and different aspect ratios of the system. Good agreement is found between the theoretical and experimental results.
  • We study the influence of network topology and connectivity on the synchronization properties of chaotic logistic maps, interacting with random delay times. Four different types of topologies are investigated: two regular (a ring-type and a ring-type with a central node) and two random (free-scale Barabasi-Albert and small-world Newman-Watts). The influence of the network connectivity is studied by varying the average number of links per node, while keeping constant the total input that each map receives from its neighbors. For weak coupling the array does not synchronize regardless the topology or connectivity of the network; however, for certain connectivity values there is enhanced coherence. For strong coupling the array synchronizes in the homogeneous steady-state, where the chaotic dynamics of the individual maps is suppressed. For both, weak and strong coupling, the array propensity for synchronization is largely independent of the network topology and depends mainly on the average number of links per node.
  • We study the stability of the fixed-point solution of an array of mutually coupled logistic maps, focusing on the influence of the delay times, $\tau_{ij}$, of the interaction between the $i$th and $j$th maps. Two of us recently reported [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\bf 94}, 134102 (2005)] that if $\tau_{ij}$ are random enough the array synchronizes in a spatially homogeneous steady state. Here we study this behavior by comparing the dynamics of a map of an array of $N$ delayed-coupled maps with the dynamics of a map with $N$ self-feedback delayed loops. If $N$ is sufficiently large, the dynamics of a map of the array is similar to the dynamics of a map with self-feedback loops with the same delay times. Several delayed loops stabilize the fixed point, when the delays are not the same; however, the distribution of delays plays a key role: if the delays are all odd a periodic orbit (and not the fixed point) is stabilized. We present a linear stability analysis and apply some mathematical theorems that explain the numerical results.
  • Coherence evolution of two food web models can be obtained under the stirring effect of chaotic advection. Each food web model sustains a three--level trophic system composed of interacting predators, consumers and vegetation. These populations compete for a common limiting resource in open flows with chaotic advection dynamics. Here we show that two species (the top--predators) of different colonies chaotically advected by a jet--like flow can synchronize their evolution even without migration interaction. The evolution is charaterized as a phase synchronization. The phase differences (determined through the Hilbert transform) of the variables representing those species show a coherent evolution.
  • We investigate the dynamics of an array of logistic maps coupled with random delay times. We report that for adequate coupling strength the array is able to synchronize, in spite of the random delays. Specifically, we find that the synchronized state is a homogeneous steady-state, where the chaotic dynamics of the individual maps is suppressed. This differs drastically from the synchronization with instantaneous and fixed-delay coupling, as in those cases the dynamics is chaotic. Also in contrast with the instantaneous and fixed-delay cases, the synchronization does not dependent on the connection topology, depends only on the average number of links per node. We find a scaling law that relates the distance to synchronization with the randomness of the delays. We also carry out a statistical linear stability analysis that confirms the numerical results and provides a better understanding of the nontrivial roles of random delayed interactions.
  • We study the synchronization of a coupled map lattice consisting of a one-dimensional chain of logistic maps. We consider global coupling with a time-delay that takes into account the finite velocity of propagation of interactions. We recently showed that clustering occurs for weak coupling, while for strong coupling the array synchronizes into a global state where each element sees all other elements in its current, present state [Physica A {\bf 325} (2003) 186, Phys. Rev. E {\bf 67} (2003) 056219]. In this paper we study the effects of in-homogeneities, both in the individual maps, which are non-identical maps evolving in period-2 orbits, and in the connection links, which have non-uniform strengths. We find that the global synchronization regime occurring for strong coupling is robust to heterogeneities: for strong enough average coupling the inhomogeneous array still synchronizes in a global state in which each element sees the other elements in positions close to its current state. However, the clustering behaviour occurring for small coupling is sensitive to inhomogeneities and differs from that occurring in the homogeneous array.