• Decoherence of a central spin coupled to an interacting spin bath via inhomogeneous Heisenberg coupling is studied by two different approaches, namely an exact equations of motion (EOMs) method and a Chebyshev expansion technique (CET). By assuming a wheel topology of the bath spins with uniform nearest-neighbor $XX$-type intrabath coupling, we examine the central spin dynamics with the bath prepared in two different types of bath initial conditions. For fully polarized baths in strong magnetic fields, the polarization dynamics of the central spin exhibits a collapse-revival behavior in the intermediate-time regime. Under an antiferromagnetic bath initial condition, the two methods give excellently consistent central spin decoherence dynamics for finite-size baths of $N\leq14$ bath spins. The decoherence factor is found to drop off abruptly on a short time scale and approach a finite plateau value which depends on the intrabath coupling strength non-monotonically. In the ultrastrong intrabath coupling regime, the plateau values show an oscillatory behavior depending on whether $N/2$ is even or odd. The observed results are interpreted qualitatively within the framework of the EOM and perturbation analysis. The effects of anisotropic spin-bath coupling and inhomogeneous intrabath bath couplings are briefly discussed. Possible experimental realization of the model in a modified quantum corral setup is suggested.
  • The dynamics of quantum phase transitions are inevitably accompanied by the formation of defects when crossing a quantum critical point. For a generic class of quantum critical systems, we solve the problem of minimizing the production of defects through the use of a gradient-based deterministic optimal control algorithm. By considering a finite size quantum Ising model with a tunable global transverse field, we show that an optimal power law quench of the transverse field across the Ising critical point works well at minimizing the number of defects, in spite of being drawn from a subset of quench profiles. These power law quenches are shown to be inherently robust against noise. The optimized defect density exhibits a transition at a critical ratio of the quench duration to the system size, which we argue coincides with the intrinsic speed limit for quantum evolution.
  • The control of quantum system dynamics is generally performed by seeking a suitable applied field. The physical objective as a functional of the field forms the quantum control landscape, whose topology, under certain conditions, has been shown to contain no critical point suboptimal traps, thereby enabling effective searches for fields that give the global maximum of the objective. This paper addresses the structure of the landscape as a complement to topological critical point features. Recent work showed that landscape structure is highly favorable for optimization of state-to-state transition probabilities, in that gradient-based control trajectories to the global maximum value are nearly straight paths. The landscape structure is codified in the metric $R\geq 1.0$, defined as the ratio of the length of the control trajectory to the Euclidean distance between the initial and optimal controls. A value of $R=1$ would indicate an exactly straight trajectory to the optimal observable value. This paper extends the state-to-state transition probability results to the quantum ensemble and unitary transformation control landscapes. Again, nearly straight trajectories predominate, and we demonstrate that $R$ can take values approaching 1.0 with high precision. However, the interplay of optimization trajectories with critical saddle submanifolds is found to influence landscape structure. A fundamental relationship necessary for perfectly straight gradient-based control trajectories is derived wherein the gradient on the quantum control landscape must be an eigenfunction of the Hessian. This relation is an indicator of landscape structure and may provide a means to identify physical conditions when control trajectories can achieve perfect linearity. The collective favorable landscape topology and structure provide a foundation to understand why optimal quantum control can be readily achieved.
  • We examine the influence of environmental interactions on simple quantum systems by obtaining the exact reduced dynamics of a qubit coupled to a one-dimensional spin bath. In contrast to previous studies, both the qubit-bath coupling and the nearest neighbor intrabath couplings are taken as the spin-flip XX-type. We first study the Rabi oscillations of a single qubit with the spin bath prepared in a spin coherent state, finding that nonresonance and finite intrabath interactions have significant effects on the qubit dynamics. Next, we discuss the bath-induced decoherence of the qubit when the bath is initially in the ground state, and show that the decoherence properties depend on the internal phases of the spin bath. By considering two independent copies of the qubit-bath system, we finally probe the disentanglement dynamics of two noninteracting entangled qubits. We find that entanglement sudden death appears when the spin bath is in its critical phase. We show that the single-qubit decoherence factor is an upper bound for the two-qubit concurrence.
  • Motivated by the findings of logarithmic spreading of entanglement in a many-body localized system, we more closely examine the spreading of entanglement in the fully many-body localized phase, where all many-body eigenstates are localized. Performing full diagonalizations of an XXZ spin model with random longitudinal fields, we identify two factors contributing to the spreading rate: the localization length ($\xi$), which depends on the disorder strength, and the final value of entanglement per spin ($s_\infty$), which primarily depends on the initial state. We find that the entanglement entropy grows with time as $\sim \xi \times s_\infty \log t$, providing support for the phenomenology of many-body localized systems recently proposed by Huse and Oganesyan [arXiv:1305.4915v1].
  • A common goal of quantum control is to maximize a physical observable through the application of a tailored field. The observable value as a function of the field constitutes a quantum control landscape. Previous works have shown, under specified conditions, that the quantum control landscape should be free of suboptimal critical points. This favorable landscape topology is one factor contributing to the efficiency of climbing the landscape. An additional, complementary factor is the landscape \textit{structure}, which constitutes all non-topological features. If the landscape's structure is too complex, then climbs may be forced to take inefficient convoluted routes to finding optimal controls. This paper provides a foundation for understanding control landscape structure by examining the linearity of gradient-based optimization trajectories through the space of control fields. For this assessment, a metric $R\geq 1$ is defined as the ratio of the path length of the optimization trajectory to the Euclidean distance between the initial control field and the resultant optimal control field that takes an observable from the bottom to the top of the landscape. Computational analyses for simple model quantum systems are performed to ascertain the relative abundance of nearly straight control trajectories encountered when optimizing a state-to-state transition probability. The collected results indicate that quantum control landscapes have very simple structural features. The favorable topology and the complementary simple structure of the control landscape provide a basis for understanding the generally observed ease of optimizing a state-to-state transition probability.
  • The quantum O(N) model in the infinite $N$ limit is a paradigm for symmetry-breaking. Qualitatively, its phase diagram is an excellent guide to the equilibrium physics for more realistic values of $N$ in varying spatial dimensions ($d>1$). Here we investigate the physics of this model out of equilibrium, specifically its response to global quenches starting in the disordered phase. If the model were to exhibit equilibration, the late time state could be inferred from the finite temperature phase diagram. In the infinite $N$ limit, we show that not only does the model not lead to equilibration on account of an infinite number of conserved quantities, it also does \emph{not} relax to a generalized Gibbs ensemble consistent with these conserved quantities. Nevertheless, we \emph{still} find that the late time states following quenches bear strong signatures of the equilibrium phase diagram. Notably, we find that the model exhibits coarsening to a non-equilibrium critical state only in dimensions $d>2$, that is, if the equilibrium phase diagram contains an ordered phase at non-zero temperatures.