• A velocity-map-imaging spectrometer is demonstrated to characterize the normalized transverse emittance of photoemitted electron bunches. The two-dimensional (2D) projected velocity distribution images of photoemitted electrons are recorded by the detection system and analyzed to obtain the normalized transverse emittance. With the presented distribution function of the electron photoemission angles a mathematical method is implemented to reconstruct the three-dimensional (3D) velocity distribution curve. As a first example, multiphoton emission from a planar Au surface is studied via irradiation at a glancing angle by intense 45 fs laser pulses at a central wavelength of 800 nm. The reconstructed energy distribution agrees very well with the Berglund-Spicer theory of photoemission. The normalized transverse emittance of the intrinsic electron bunch is characterized to be 0.52 and 0.05 $\pi \cdot mm \cdot mrad$ in $X$- and $Y$-directions, respectively.
  • We explore the far-field scattering properties of anisotropic 2D materials in ribbon array configuration. Our study reveals the plasmon-enhanced linear birefringence in these ultrathin metasurfaces, where linearly polarized incident light can be scattered into its orthogonal polarization or be converted into circular polarized light. We found wide modulation in both amplitude and phase of the scattered light via tuning the operating frequency or material's anisotropy and develop models to explain the observed scattering behavior.
  • Free Electron Lasers (FELs) are a solution for providing intense, coherent and bright radiation in the hard X-ray regime. Due to the low wall-plug efficiency of FEL facilities, it is crucial and additionally very useful to develop complete and accurate simulation tools for better optimizing a FEL interaction. The highly sophisticated dynamics involved in a FEL process was the main obstacle hindering the development of general simulation tools for this problem. We present a numerical algorithm based on finite difference time domain/Particle in cell (FDTD/PIC) in a Lorentz boosted coordinate system which is able to fulfil a full-wave simulation of a FEL process. The developed software offers a suitable tool for the analysis of FEL interactions without considering any of the usual approximations. A coordinate transformation to bunch rest frame makes the very different length scales of bunch size, optical wavelengths and the undulator period transform to values with the same order. Consequently, FDTD/PIC simulations in conjunction with efficient parallelization techniques make the full-wave simulation feasible using the available computational resources. Several examples of free electron lasers are analyzed using the developed software, the results are benchmarked based on standard FEL codes and discussed in detail.
  • Linear acceleration in free space is a topic that has been studied for over 20 years, and its ability to eventually produce high-quality, high energy multi-particle bunches has remained a subject of great interest. Arguments can certainly be made that such an ability is very doubtful. Nevertheless, we chose to develop an accurate and truly predictive theoretical formalism to explore this remote possibility in a computational experiment. The formalism includes exact treatment of Maxwell's equations, exact relativistic treatment of the interaction among the multiple individual particles, and exact treatment of the interaction at near and far field. Several surprising results emerged. For example, we find that 30 keV electrons (2.5% energy spread) can be accelerated to 7.7 MeV (2.5% spread) and to 205 MeV (0.25% spread) using 25 mJ and 2.5 J lasers respectively. These findings should hopefully guide and help develop compact, high-quality, ultra-relativistic electron sources, avoiding conventional limits imposed by material breakdown or structural constraints.
  • We introduce a solution for producing ultrashort ($\sim$fs) high charge ($\sim$pC) from ultra-compact guns utilizing single-cycle THz pulses. We show that the readily available THz pulses with energies as low as 20 ?J are sufficient to generate multi-10 keV electron bunches. Moreover, It is demonstrated that THz energies of 2mJ are sufficient to generate relativistic electron bunches with higher than 2 MeV energy. The high acceleration gradients possible in the structures provide 30 fs electron bunches at 30 keV energy and 45 fs bunches at 2 MeV energy. These structures will underpin future devices for strong field THz physics in general and miniaturized electron guns, in which the high fields combined with the short pulse duration enable electron beams with ultrahigh brightness.
  • Ultrashort electron beams with narrow energy spread, high charge, and low jitter are essential for resolving phase transitions in metals, semiconductors, and molecular crystals. These semirelativistic beams, produced by phototriggered electron guns, are also injected into accelerators for x-ray light sources. The achievable resolution of these time-resolved electron diffraction or x-ray experiments has been hindered by surface field and timing jitter limitations in conventional RF guns, which thus far are <200 MV/m and >96 fs, respectively. A gun driven by optically-generated single-cycle THz pulses provides a practical solution to enable not only GV/m surface fields but also absolute timing stability, since the pulses are generated by the same laser as the phototrigger. Here, we demonstrate an all-optical THz gun yielding peak electron energies approaching 1 keV, accelerated by 300 MV/m THz fields in a novel micron-scale waveguide structure. We also achieve quasimonoenergetic, sub-keV bunches with 32 fC of charge, which can already be used for time-resolved low-energy electron diffraction. Such ultracompact, easy to implement guns driven by intrinsically synchronized THz pulses that are pumped by an amplified arm of the already present photoinjector laser provide a new tool with potential to transform accelerator based science.
  • We refine the method towards extraction of sub-cycle transients in the 0.1-1 THz frequency (mm-wavelength) range from optical rectification in lithium niobate using tilted pulse fronts. Our scheme exploits previously unexplored spatio-temporal shaping of the pump pulses, resulting in highly efficient and near diffraction-limited sub-THz transients reaching 0.2 GV/m electric field strengths in free-space using only mJ-level optical ps-pulses. We address experimentally and theoretically the means to producing above-GV/m relativistic sub-THz transients with proper beam confinement and under moderate pumping conditions, thereby bringing widespread access to strong-field and nonlinear terahertz applications and devices.
  • The cost, size and availability of electron accelerators is dominated by the achievable accelerating gradient. Conventional high-brightness radio-frequency (RF) accelerating structures operate with 30-50 MeV/m gradients. Electron accelerators driven with optical or infrared sources have demonstrated accelerating gradients orders of magnitude above that achievable with conventional RF structures. However, laser-driven wakefield accelerators require intense femtosecond sources and direct laser-driven accelerators and suffer from low bunch charge, sub-micron tolerances and sub-femtosecond timing requirements due to the short wavelength of operation. Here, we demonstrate the first linear acceleration of electrons with keV energy gain using optically-generated terahertz (THz) pulses. THz-driven accelerating structures enable high-gradient electron or proton accelerators with simple accelerating structures, high repetition rates and significant charge per bunch. Increasing the operational frequency of accelerators into the THz band allows for greatly increased accelerating gradients due to reduced complications with respect to breakdown and pulsed heating. Electric fields in the GV/m range have been achieved in the THz frequency band using all optical methods. With recent advances in the generation of THz pulses via optical rectification of slightly sub-picosecond pulses, in particular improvements in conversion efficiency and multi-cycle pulses, increasing accelerating gradients by two orders of magnitude over conventional linear accelerators (LINACs) has become a possibility. These ultra-compact THz accelerators with extremely short electron bunches hold great potential to have a transformative impact for free electron lasers, future linear particle colliders, ultra-fast electron diffraction, x-ray science, and medical therapy with x-rays and electron beams.
  • Nonlocal electromagnetic effects of graphene arise from its naturally dispersive dielectric response. We present semi-analytical solutions of nonlocal Maxwell's equations for graphene nano-ribbons array with features around 100 nm, where we found prominent departures from its local response. Interestingly, the nonlocal corrections are stronger for light polarization parallel to the ribbons, which manifests as additional broadening of the Drude peak. For the perpendicular polarization case, nonlocal effects lead to blue-shifts of the plasmon peaks. These manifestations provide a physical measure of nonlocal effects, and we quantify their dependence on ribbon width, doping and wavelength.
  • We numerically investigate the acceleration and bunch compression capabilities of 20 mJ, 0.6 THz-centered coherent terahertz pulses in optimized metallic dielectric-loaded cylindrical waveguides. In particular, we theoretically demonstrate the acceleration of 1.6 pC and 16 pC electron bunches from 1 MeV to 10 MeV over an interaction distance of 20mm, the compression of a 1.6 pC 1 MeV bunch from 100 fs to 2 fs (50 times compression) over an interaction distance of about 18mm, and the compression of a 1.6 pC 10 MeV bunch from 100 fs to 1.61 fs (62 times) over an interaction distance of 42 cm. The obtained results show the promise of coherent THz pulses in realizing compact electron acceleration and bunch compression schemes.
  • The potential of graphene for use in photonic applications was evidenced by recent demonstrations of modulators, polarisation rotators, and isolators. These promising yet preliminary results raise crucial questions: what is the optimal performance achievable by more complex designs using multilayer structures, graphene patterning, metal additions, or a combination of these approaches, and how can this optimum design be achieved in practice? Today, the complexity of the problem, which is magnified by the variability in graphene parameters, leaves the design of these new devices to time-consuming and suboptimal trial-and-error procedures. We address this issue by first demonstrating that the relevant figures of merit for the devices above are subject to absolute theoretical upper bounds. Strikingly these limits are related only to the conductivity tensor of graphene; thus, we can provide essential roadmap information such as the best possible device performance versus wavelength and graphene quality. Second, based on the theory developed, physical insight, and detailed simulations, we demonstrate how structures closely approaching these fundamental limits can be designed, demonstrating the possibility of significant improvement. These results are believed to be of paramount importance for the design of graphene-based modulators, rotators, and isolators and are also directly applicable to other 2-dimensional materials.
  • Faraday rotation is a fundamental magneto-optical phenomenon used in various optical control and magnetic field sensing techniques. Recently, it was shown that a giant Faraday rotation can be achieved in the low-THz regime by a single monoatomic graphene layer. Here, we demonstrate that this exceptional property can be manipulated through adequate nano-patterning, notably achieving giant rotation up to 6THz with features no smaller than 100nm. The effect of the periodic patterning on the Faraday rotation is predicted by a simple physical model, which is then verified and refined through accurate full-wave simulations.
  • Periodic structures with subwavelength features are instrumental in the versatile and effective control of electromagnetic waves from radio frequencies up to optics. In this paper, we theoretically evaluate the potential applications and performance of electromagnetic metasurfaces made of periodically patterned graphene. Several graphene metasurfaces are presented, thereby demonstrating that such ultrathin surfaces can be used to dynamically control the electromagnetic wave reflection, absorption, or polarization. Indeed, owing to the graphene properties, the structure performance in terms of resonance frequencies and bandwidths changes with the variation of electrostatic bias fields. To demonstrate the applicability of the concept at different frequency ranges, the examples provided range from microwave to infrared, corresponding to graphene features with length-scales of a few millimeters down to about a micrometer, respectively. The results are obtained using a full-vector semianalytical numerical technique developed to accurately model the graphene-based multilayer periodic structures under study.