• Spectropolarimetric surveys reveal that 8-10\% of OBA stars harbor large-scale magnetic fields, but thus far no such fields have been detected in any classical Be stars. Motivated by this, we present here MHD simulations for how a pre-existing Keplerian disc -- like that inferred to form from decretion of material from rapidly rotating Be stars -- can be disrupted by a rotation-aligned stellar dipole field. For characteristic stellar and disc parameters of a near-critically rotating B2e star, we find that a polar surface field strength of just 10 G can significantly disrupt the disc, while a field of 100 G, near the observational upper limit inferred for most Be stars, completely destroys the disc over just a few days. Our parameter study shows that the efficacy of this magnetic disruption of a disc scales with the characteristic plasma beta {(defined as the ratio between thermal and magnetic pressure)} in the disc, but is surprisingly insensitive to other variations, e.g. in stellar rotation speed, or the mass loss rate of the star's radiatively driven wind. The disc disruption seen here for even a modest field strength suggests that the presumed formation of such Be discs by decretion of material from the star would likely be strongly inhibited by such fields; this provides an attractive explanation for why no large-scale fields are detected from such Be stars.
  • Most radiatively-driven massive star winds can be modelled with m-CAK theory resulting in so called fast solution. However, those most rapidly rotating among them, especially when the stellar rotational speed is higher than $\sim 75\%$ of the critical rotational speed, can adopt a different solution called $\Omega$-slow solution characterized by a dense and slow wind. Here, in this work we study the transition region of the solutions where the fast solution changes to the $\Omega$-slow. Using both time-steady and time-dependent numerical codes, we study this transition region for different equatorial models of B-type stars. In all the cases, at certain range of rotational speeds, we found a region where the fast and $\Omega$-slow solution can co-exist. We find that the type of solution obtained in this co-existence region depends heavily on the initial conditions of our models. We also test the stability of the solutions within the co-existence region by performing base density perturbations in the wind. We find that under certain conditions, the fast solution can switch to a $\Omega$-slow solution, or vice versa. Such solution switching may be a possible contributor of material injected into the circumstellar environment of Be stars, without requiring rotational speeds near critical values.
  • Although initially thought to be promising for production of the r-process nuclei, standard models of neutrino-heated winds from proto-neutron stars (PNSs) do not reach the requisite neutron-to-seed ratio for production of the lanthanides and actinides. However, the abundance distribution created by the r-, rp-, or $\nu p$-processes in PNS winds depends sensitively on the entropy and dynamical expansion timescale of the flow, which may be strongly affected by high magnetic fields. Here, we present results from magnetohydrodynamic simulations of non-rotating neutrino-heated PNS winds with strong dipole magnetic fields from $10^{14}-10^{16}$ G, and assess their role in altering the conditions for nucleosynthesis. The strong field forms a closed zone and helmet streamer configuration at the equator, with episodic dynamical mass ejections in toroidal plasmoids. We find dramatically enhanced entropy in these regions and conditions favorable for third-peak r-process nucleosynthesis if the wind is neutron-rich. If instead the wind is proton-rich, the conditions will affect the abundances from the $\nu p$-process. We quantify the distribution of ejected matter in entropy and dynamical expansion timescale, and the critical magnetic field strength required to affect the entropy. For $B\gtrsim10^{15}$ G, we find that $\gtrsim10^{-6}$ M$_{\odot}$ and up to $\sim10^{-5}$ M$_{\odot}$ of high entropy material is ejected per highly-magnetized neutron star birth in the wind phase, providing a mechanism for prompt heavy element enrichment of the universe. Former binary companions identified within (magnetar-hosting) supernova remnants, the remnants themselves, and runaway stars may exhibit overabundances. We provide a comparison with a semi-analytic model of plasmoid eruption and discuss implications and extensions.
  • We conducted a survey of seven magnetic O and eleven B-type stars with masses above $8M_{\odot}$ using the Very Large Array in the 1cm, 3cm and 13cm bands. The survey resulted in a detection of two O and two B-type stars. While the detected O-type stars - HD 37742 and HD 47129 - are in binary systems, the detected B-type stars, HD 156424 and ALS 9522, are not known to be in binaries. All four stars were detected at 3cm, whereas three were detected at 1cm and only one star was detected at 13cm. The detected B-type stars are significantly more radio luminous than the non-detected ones, which is not the case for O-type stars. The non-detections at 13cm are interpreted as due to thermal free-free absorption. Mass-loss rates were estimated using 3cm flux densities and were compared with theoretical mass-loss rates, which assume free-free emission. For HD 37742, the two values of the mass-loss rates were in good agreement, possibly suggesting that the radio emission for this star is mainly thermal. For the other three stars, the estimated mass-loss rates from radio observations were much higher than those expected from theory, suggesting either a possible contribution from non- thermal emission from the magnetic star or thermal or non-thermal emission due to interacting winds of the binary system, especially for HD 47129. All the detected stars are predicted to host centrifugal magnetospheres except HD 37742, which is likely to host a dynamical magnetosphere. This suggests that non-thermal radio emission is favoured in stars with centrifugal magnetospheres.
  • Context. Red-giant stars may engulf planets. This may increase the rotation rate of their convective envelope, which could lead to strong dynamo-triggered magnetic fields. Aims. We explore the possibility of generating magnetic fields in red giants that have gone through the process of a planet engulfment. We compare them with similar models that evolve without any planets. We discuss the impact of stellar wind magnetic braking on the evolution of the surface velocity of the parent star. Methods. With rotating stellar models with and without planets and an empirical relation between the Rossby number and the surface magnetic field, we deduce the evolution of the surface magnetic field along the red-giant branch. The effects of wind magnetic braking is explored using a relation deduced from MHD simulations. Results. The stellar evolution model of a 1.7 M$_\odot$ without planet engulfment and that has a time-averaged rotation velocity during the Main-Sequence equal to 100 km s$^{-1}$, shows a surface magnetic field triggered by convection larger than 10 G only at the base of the red giant branch, that means for gravities log $g > 3$. When a planet engulfment occurs, such magnetic field can also appear at much lower gravities, i.e. at much higher luminosities along the red giant branch. Typically the engulfment of a 15 M$_J$ planet produces a dynamo triggered magnetic field larger than 10 G for gravities between 2.5 and 1.9. We show that for reasonable wind magnetic braking laws, the high surface velocity reached after a planet engulfment may be maintained sufficiently long for being observable. Conclusions. High surface magnetic fields for red giants in the upper part of the red giant branch is a strong indication of a planet engulfment or of an interaction with a companion. Our theory can be tested by observing fast rotating red giants and check whether they show magnetic fields.
  • Slowly rotating magnetic massive stars develop "dynamical magnetospheres" (DM's), characterized by trapping of stellar wind outflow in closed magnetic loops, shock heating from collision of the upflow from opposite loop footpoints, and subsequent gravitational infall of radiatively cooled material. In 2D and 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations the interplay among these three components is spatially complex and temporally variable, making it difficult to derive observational signatures and discern their overall scaling trends.Within a simplified, steady-state analysis based on overall conservation principles, we present here an "analytic dynamical magnetosphere" (ADM) model that provides explicit formulae for density, temperature and flow speed in each of these three components -- wind outflow, hot post-shock gas, and cooled inflow -- as a function of colatitude and radius within the closed (presumed dipole) field lines of the magnetosphere. We compare these scalings with time-averaged results from MHD simulations, and provide initial examples of application of this ADM model for deriving two key observational diagnostics, namely hydrogen H-alpha emission line profiles from the cooled infall, and X-ray emission from the hot post-shock gas. We conclude with a discussion of key issues and advantages in applying this ADM formalism toward derivation of a broader set of observational diagnostics and scaling trends for massive stars with such dynamical magnetospheres.
  • A subset (~ 10%) of massive stars present strong, globally ordered (mostly dipolar) magnetic fields. The trapping and channeling of their stellar winds in closed magnetic loops leads to magnetically confined wind shocks (MCWS), with pre-shock flow speeds that are some fraction of the wind terminal speed. These shocks generate hot plasma, a source of X-rays. In the last decade, several developments took place, notably the determination of the hot plasma properties for a large sample of objects using XMM-Newton and Chandra, as well as fully self-consistent MHD modelling and the identification of shock retreat effects in weak winds. Despite a few exceptions, the combination of magnetic confinement, shock retreat and rotation effects seems to be able to account for X-ray emission in massive OB stars. Here we review these new observational and theoretical aspects of this X-ray emission and envisage some perspectives for the next generation of X-ray observatories.
  • In this paper we report 23 magnetic field measurements of the B3IV star HD 23478: 12 obtained from high resolution Stokes $V$ spectra using the ESPaDOnS (CFHT) and Narval (TBL) spectropolarimeters, and 11 from medium resolution Stokes $V$ spectra obtained with the DimaPol spectropolarimeter (DAO). HD 23478 was one of two rapidly rotating stars identified as potential "centrifugal magnetosphere" hosts based on IR observations from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment survey. We derive basic physical properties of this star including its mass ($M=6.1^{+0.8}_{-0.7}\,M_\odot$), effective temperature ($T_{\rm eff}=20\pm2\,$kK), radius ($R=2.7^{+1.6}_{-0.9}\,R_\odot$), and age ($\tau_{\rm age}=3^{+37}_{-1}\,$Myr). We repeatedly detect weakly-variable Zeeman signatures in metal, He and H lines in all our observations corresponding to a longitudinal magnetic field of $\langle B_z\rangle\approx-2.0\,$kG. The rotational period is inferred from Hipparcos photometry ($P_{\rm rot}=1.0498(4)\,$d). Under the assumption of the Oblique Rotator Model, our obsevations yield a surface dipole magnetic field of strength $B_d\geq9.5\,$kG that is approximately aligned with the stellar rotation axis. We confirm the presence of strong and broad H$\alpha$ emission and gauge the volume of this star's centrifugal magnetosphere to be consistent with those of other H$\alpha$ emitting centrifugal magnetosphere stars based on the large inferred Alfv\'en to Kepler radius ratio.
  • We use 2D MHD simulations to examine the effects of radiative cooling and inverse Compton (IC) cooling on X-ray emission from magnetically confined wind shocks (MCWS) in magnetic massive stars with radiatively driven stellar winds. For the standard dependence of mass loss rate on luminosity $\Mdot \sim L^{1.7} $, the scaling of IC cooling with $L$ and radiative cooling with $\Mdot$ means that IC cooling become formally more important for lower luminosity stars. However, because the sense of the trends is similar, we find the overall effect of including IC cooling is quite modest. More significantly, for stars with high enough mass loss to keep the shocks radiative, the MHD simulations indicate a linear scaling of X-ray luminosity with mass loss rate; but for lower luminosity stars with weak winds, X-ray emission is reduced and softened by a {\em shock retreat} resulting from the larger post-shock cooling length, which within the fixed length of a closed magnetic loop forces the shock back to lower pre-shock wind speeds. A semi-analytic scaling analysis that accounts both for the wind magnetic confinement and this shock retreat yields X-ray luminosities that have a similar scaling trend, but a factor few higher values, compared to time-averages computed from the MHD simulations. The simulation and scaling results here thus provide a good basis for interpreting available X-ray observations from the growing list of massive stars with confirmed large-scale magnetic fields.
  • OB stars are known to exhibit various types of wind variability, as detected in their ultraviolet spectra, amongst which are the ubiquitous discrete absorption components (DACs). These features have been associated with large-scale azimuthal structures extending from the base of the wind to its outer regions: corotating interaction regions (CIRs). There are several competing hypotheses as to which physical processes may perturb the star's surface and generate CIRs, including magnetic fields and non radial pulsations (NRPs), the subjects of this paper with a particular emphasis on the former. Although large-scale magnetic fields are ruled out, magnetic spots deserve further investigation, both on the observational and theoretical fronts.
  • The growth of luminous structures and the building blocks of life in the Universe began as primordial gas was processed in stars and mixed at galactic scales. The mechanisms responsible for this development are not well understood and have changed over the intervening 13 billion years. To follow the evolution of matter over cosmic time, it is necessary to study the strongest (resonance) transitions of the most abundant species in the Universe. Most of them are in the ultraviolet (UV; 950A-3000A) spectral range that is unobservable from the ground. A versatile space observatory with UV sensitivity a factor of 50-100 greater than existing facilities will revolutionize our understanding of the Universe. Habitable planets grow in protostellar discs under ultraviolet irradiation, a by-product of the star-disk interaction that drives the physical and chemical evolution of discs and young planetary systems. The electronic transitions of the most abundant molecules are pumped by the UV field, providing unique diagnostics of the planet-forming environment that cannot be accessed from the ground. Earth's atmosphere is in constant interaction with the interplanetary medium and the solar UV radiation field. A 50-100 times improvement in sensitivity would enable the observation of the key atmospheric ingredients of Earth-like exoplanets (carbon, oxygen, ozone), provide crucial input for models of biologically active worlds outside the solar system, and provide the phenomenological baseline to understand the Earth atmosphere in context. In this white paper, we outline the key science that such a facility would make possible and outline the instrumentation to be implemented.
  • We present the first fully 3D MHD simulation for magnetic channeling and confinement of a radiatively driven, massive-star wind. The specific parameters are chosen to represent the prototypical slowly rotating magnetic O star \theta^1 Ori C, for which centrifugal and other dynamical effects of rotation are negligible. The computed global structure in latitude and radius resembles that found in previous 2D simulations, with unimpeded outflow along open field lines near the magnetic poles, and a complex equatorial belt of inner wind trapping by closed loops near the stellar surface, giving way to outflow above the Alfv\'{e}n radius. In contrast to this previous 2D work, the 3D simulation described here now also shows how this complex structure fragments in azimuth, forming distinct clumps of closed loop infall within the Alfv\'{e}n radius, transitioning in the outer wind to radial spokes of enhanced density with characteristic azimuthal separation of $15-20 \degr$. Applying these results in a 3D code for line radiative transfer, we show that emission from the associated 3D `dynamical magnetosphere' matches well the observed H\alpha emission seen from \theta^1 Ori C, fitting both its dynamic spectrum over rotational phase, as well as the observed level of cycle to cycle stochastic variation. Comparison with previously developed 2D models for Balmer emission from a dynamical magnetosphere generally confirms that time-averaging over 2D snapshots can be a good proxy for the spatial averaging over 3D azimuthal wind structure. Nevertheless, fully 3D simulations will still be needed to model the emission from magnetospheres with non-dipole field components, such as suggested by asymmetric features seen in the H\alpha equivalent-width curve of \theta^1 Ori C.
  • Due to computational requirements and numerical difficulties associated with coordinate singularity in spherical geometry, fully dynamic 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of massive star winds are not readily available. Here we report preliminary results of the first such a 3D simulation using $\theta^1$ Ori C (O5.5 V) as a model. The oblique magnetic rotator $\theta^1$ Ori C is a source of hard X-ray emitting plasma in its circumstellar environment. Our numerical model can explain both the hardness and the location of the X-ray emission from this star confirming that magnetically confined wind shock (MCWS) is the dominating mechanism for hard Xrays in some massive stars.
  • The magnetic O-star HD191612 exhibits strongly variable, cyclic Balmer line emission on a 538-day period. We show here that its variable Halpha emission can be well reproduced by the rotational phase variation of synthetic spectra computed directly from full radiation magneto-hydrodynamical simulations of a magnetically confined wind. In slow rotators such as HD191612, wind material on closed magnetic field loops falls back to the star, but the transient suspension of material within the loops leads to a statistically overdense, low velocity region around the magnetic equator, causing the spectral variations. We contrast such "dynamical magnetospheres" (DMs) with the more steady-state "centrifugal magnetospheres" of stars with rapid rotation, and discuss the prospects of using this DM paradigm to explain periodic line emission from also other non-rapidly rotating magnetic massive stars.
  • The Great Nebula in Carina provides an exceptional view into the violent massive star formation and feedback that typifies giant HII regions and starburst galaxies. We have mapped the Carina star-forming complex in X-rays, using archival Chandra data and a mosaic of 20 new 60ks pointings using the Chandra X-ray Observatory's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, as a testbed for understanding recent and ongoing star formation and to probe Carina's regions of bright diffuse X-ray emission. This study has yielded a catalog of properties of >14,000 X-ray point sources; >9800 of them have multiwavelength counterparts. Using Chandra's unsurpassed X-ray spatial resolution, we have separated these point sources from the extensive, spatially-complex diffuse emission that pervades the region; X-ray properties of this diffuse emission suggest that it traces feedback from Carina's massive stars. In this introductory paper, we motivate the survey design, describe the Chandra observations, and present some simple results, providing a foundation for the 15 papers that follow in this Special Issue and that present detailed catalogs, methods, and science results.
  • We examine the angular momentum loss and associated rotational spin-down for magnetic hot stars with a line-driven stellar wind and a rotation-aligned dipole magnetic field. Our analysis here is based on our previous 2-D numerical MHD simulation study that examines the interplay among wind, field, and rotation as a function of two dimensionless parameters, W(=Vrot/Vorb) and 'wind magnetic confinement', $\eta_\ast$ defined below. We compare and contrast the 2-D, time variable angular momentum loss of this dipole model of a hot-star wind with the classical 1-D steady-state analysis by Weber and Davis (WD), who used an idealized monopole field to model the angular momentum loss in the solar wind. Despite the differences, we find that the total angular momentum loss averaged over both solid angle and time follows closely the general WD scaling $\dot {J} \sim \dot {M} \Omega R_A^2$. The key distinction is that for a dipole field Alfv\`en radius $R_A$ is significantly smaller than for the monopole field WD used in their analyses. This leads to a slower stellar spin-down for the dipole field with typical spin-down times of order 1 Myr for several known magnetic massive stars.
  • We examine the angular momentum loss and associated rotational spindown for magnetic hot stars with a line-driven stellar wind and a rotation-aligned dipole magnetic field. Our analysis here is based on our previous 2-D numerical MHD simulation study that examines the interplay among wind, field, and rotation as a function of two dimensionless parameters, one characterizing the wind magnetic confinement ($\eta_{\ast} \equiv B_{eq}^{2} R_{\ast}^{2}/{\dot M} v_{\infty}$), and the other the ratio ($W \equiv V_{rot}/V_{orb}$) of stellar rotation to critical (orbital) speed. We compare and contrast the 2-D, time variable angular momentum loss of this dipole model of a hot-star wind with the classical 1-D steady-state analysis by Weber and Davis (WD), who used an idealized monopole field to model the angular momentum loss in the solar wind. Despite the differences, we find that the total angular momentum loss ${\dot J}$ averaged over both solid angle and time follows closely the general WD scaling ${\dot J} = (2/3) {\dot M} \Omega R_{A}^{2}$, where ${\dot M}$ is the mass loss rate, $\Omega$ is the stellar angular velocity, and $R_{A}$ is a characteristic Alfv\'{e}n radius. However, a key distinction here is that for a dipole field, this Alfv\'{e}n radius has a strong-field scaling $R_{A}/R_{\ast} \approx \eta_{\ast}^{1/4}$, instead of the scaling $R_{A}/R_{\ast} \sim \sqrt{\eta_{\ast}}$ for a monopole field. This leads to a slower stellar spindown time that in the dipole case scales as $\tau_{spin} = \tau_{mass} 1.5k/\sqrt{\eta_{\ast}}$, where $\tau_{mass} \equiv M/{\dot M}$ is the characteristic mass loss time, and $k$ is the dimensionless factor for stellar moment of inertia. The full numerical scaling relation we cite gives typical spindown times of order 1 Myr for several known magnetic massive stars.
  • Building upon our previous MHD simulation study of magnetic channeling in radiatively driven stellar winds, we examine here the additional dynamical effects of stellar {\em rotation} in the (still) 2-D axisymmetric case of an aligned dipole surface field. In addition to the magnetic confinement parameter $\eta_{\ast}$ introduced in Paper I, we characterize the stellar rotation in terms of a parameter $W \equiv V_{\rm{rot}}/V_{\rm{orb}}$ (the ratio of the equatorial surface rotation speed to orbital speed), examining specifically models with moderately strong rotation $W =$ 0.25 and 0.5, and comparing these to analogous non-rotating cases. Defining the associated Alfv\'{e}n radius $R_{\rm{A}} \approx \eta_{\ast}^{1/4} \Rstar$ and Kepler corotation radius $R_{\rm{K}} \approx W^{-2/3} \Rstar$, we find rotation effects are weak for models with $R_{\rm{A}} < R_{\rm{K}}$, but can be substantial and even dominant for models with $R_{\rm{A}} \gtwig R_{\rm{K}}$. In particular, by extending our simulations to magnetic confinement parameters (up to $\eta_{\ast} = 1000$) that are well above those ($\eta_{\ast} = 10$) considered in Paper I, we are able to study cases with $R_{\rm{A}} \gg R_{\rm{K}}$; we find that these do indeed show clear formation of the {\em rigid-body} disk predicted in previous analytic models, with however a rather complex, dynamic behavior characterized by both episodes of downward infall and outward breakout that limit the buildup of disk mass. Overall, the results provide an intriguing glimpse into the complex interplay between rotation and magnetic confinement, and form the basis for a full MHD description of the rigid-body disks expected in strongly magnetic Bp stars like $\sigma$ Ori E.
  • We report on four Chandra grating observations of the oblique magnetic rotator theta^1 Ori C (O5.5 V) covering a wide range of viewing angles with respect to the star's 1060 G dipole magnetic field. We employ line-width and centroid analyses to study the dynamics of the X-ray emitting plasma in the circumstellar environment, as well as line-ratio diagnostics to constrain the spatial location, and global spectral modeling to constrain the temperature distribution and abundances of the very hot plasma. We investigate these diagnostics as a function of viewing angle and analyze them in conjunction with new MHD simulations of the magnetically channeled wind shock mechanism on theta^1 Ori C. This model fits all the data surprisingly well, predicting the temperature, luminosity, and occultation of the X-ray emitting plasma with rotation phase.
  • We carry out an extended analytic study of how the tilt and faster-than-radial expansion from a magnetic field affect the mass flux and flow speed of a line-driven stellar wind. A key motivation is to reconcile results of numerical MHD simulations with previous analyses that had predicted non-spherical expansion would lead to a strong speed enhancement. By including finite-disk correction effects, a dynamically more consistent form for the non-spherical expansion, and a moderate value of the line-driving power index $\alpha$, we infer more modest speed enhancements that are in good quantitative agreement with MHD simulations, and also are more consistent with observational results. Our analysis also explains simulation results that show the latitudinal variation of the surface mass flux scales with the square of the cosine of the local tilt angle between the magnetic field and the radial direction. Finally, we present a perturbation analysis of the effects of a finite gas pressure on the wind mass loss rate and flow speed in both spherical and magnetic wind models, showing that these scale with the ratio of the sound speed to surface escape speed, $a/v_{esc}$, and are typically 10-20% compared to an idealized, zero-gas-pressure model.
  • We summarize recent 2D MHD simulations of line-driven stellar winds from rotating hot-stars with a dipole magnetic field aligned to the star's rotation axis. For moderate to strong fields, much wind outflow is initially along closed magnetic loops that nearly corotate as a solid body with the underlying star, thus providing a torque that results in an effective angular momentum spin-up of the outflowing material. But instead of forming the ``magnetically torqued disk'' (MTD) postulated in previous phenemenological analyses, the dynamical simulations here show that material trapped near the tops of such closed loops tends either to fall back or break out, depending on whether it is below or above the Keplerian corotation radius. Overall the results raise serious questions about whether magnetic torquing of a wind outflow could naturally result in a Keplerian circumstellar disk. However, for very strong fields, it does still seem possible to form a %``magnetically confined, centrifugally supported, rigid-body disk'', centrifugally supported, ``magnetically rigid disk'' (MRD), in which the field not only forces material to maintain a rigid-body rotation, but for some extended period also holds it down against the outward centrifugal force at the loop tops. We argue that such rigid-body disks seem ill-suited to explain the disk emission from Be stars, but could provide a quite attractive paradigm for circumstellar emission from the magnetically strong Bp and Ap stars.
  • This talk summarizes results from recent MHD simulations of the role of a dipole magnetic field in inducing large-scale structure in the line-driven stellar winds of hot, luminous stars. Unlike previous fixed-field analyses, the MHD simulations here take full account of the dynamical competition between the field and the flow. A key result is that the overall degree to which the wind is influenced by the field depends largely on a single, dimensionless `wind magnetic confinement parameter', $\eta_\ast (= B_{eq}^2 R_{\ast}^2/\dot{M} v_\infty$), which characterizes the ratio between magnetic field energy density and kinetic energy density of the wind. For weak confinement, $\eta_\ast \le 1$, the field is fully opened by wind outflow, but nonetheless, for confinement as small as $\eta_\ast=1/10$ it can have significant back-influence in enhancing the density and reducing the flow speed near the magnetic equator. For stronger confinement, $\eta_\ast > 1$, the magnetic field remains closed over limited range of latitude and height above the equatorial surface, but eventually is opened into nearly radial configuration at large radii. Within the closed loops, the flow is channeled toward loop tops into shock collisions that are strong enough to produce hard X-rays. Within the open field region, the equatorial channeling leads to oblique shocks that are again strong enough to produce X-rays and also lead to a thin, dense, slowly outflowing ``disk'' at the magnetic equator.
  • The launch of high-spectral-resolution x-ray telescopes (Chandra, XMM) has provided a host of new spectral line diagnostics for the astrophysics community. In this paper we discuss Doppler-broadened emission line profiles from highly supersonic outflows of massive stars. These outflows, or winds, are driven by radiation pressure and carry a tremendous amount of kinetic energy, which can be converted to x rays by shock-heating even a small fraction of the wind plasma. The unshocked, cold wind is a source of continuum opacity to the x rays generated in the shock-heated portion of the wind. Thus the emergent line profiles are affected by transport through a two-component, moving, optically thick medium. While complicated, the interactions among these physical effects can provide quantitative information about the spatial distribution and velocity of the x-ray-emitting and absorbing plasma in stellar winds. We present quantitative models of both a spherically-symmetric wind and a wind with hot plasma confined in an equatorial disk by a dipole magnetic field.
  • We present numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the effect of stellar dipole magnetic fields on line-driven wind outflows from hot, luminous stars. Unlike previous fixed-field analyses, the simulations here take full account of the dynamical competition between field and flow, and thus apply to a full range of magnetic field strength, and within both closed and open magnetic topologies. A key result is that the overall degree to which the wind is influenced by the field depends largely on a single, dimensionless, `wind magnetic confinement parameter', $\eta_{\ast}$ ($ = B_{eq}^2 R_\ast^2/{\dot M} v_\infty$), which characterizes the ratio between magnetic field energy density and kinetic energy density of the wind. For weak confinement $\eta_{\ast} \le 1$, the field is fully opened by the wind outflow, but nonetheless for confinements as small as $\eta_{\ast}=1/10$ can have a significant back-influence in enhancing the density and reducing the flow speed near the magnetic equator. For stronger confinement $\eta_{\ast} > 1$, the magnetic field remains closed over a limited range of latitude and height about the equatorial surface, but eventually is opened into a nearly radial configuration at large radii.
  • High-resolution X-ray spectra of high-mass stars and low-mass T-Tauri stars obtained during the first year of the Chandra mission are providing important clues about the mechanisms which produce X-rays on very young stars. For zeta Puppis (O4 If) and zeta Ori (O9.5 I), the broad, blue-shifted line profiles, line ratios, and derived temperature distribution suggest that the X-rays are produced throughout the wind via instability-driven wind shocks. For some less luminous OB stars, like theta^1 Ori C (O7 V) and tau Sco (B0 V), the line profiles are symmetric and narrower. The presence of time-variable emission and very high-temperature lines in theta^1 Ori C and tau Sco suggest that magnetically confined wind shocks may be at work. The grating spectrum of the classical T-Tauri star TW Hya is remarkable because the forbidden-line emission of He-like Ne IX and O VII is very weak, implying that the X-ray emitting region is very dense, n = 6E+12 cgs, or that the X-rays are produced very close to the ultraviolet hotspot at the base of an accretion funnel. ACIS light curves and spectra of flares and low-mass and high-mass young stellar objects in Orion and rho Ophiuchus further suggest that extreme magnetic activity is a general property of many very young stars.