• Most Type I superluminous supernovae (SLSNe-I) reported to date have been identified by their high peak luminosities and spectra lacking obvious signs of hydrogen. We demonstrate that these events can be distinguished from normal-luminosity SNe (including Type Ic events) solely from their spectra over a wide range of light-curve phases. We use this distinction to select 19 SLSNe-I and 4 possible SLSNe-I from the Palomar Transient Factory archive (including 7 previously published objects). We present 127 new spectra of these objects and combine these with 39 previously published spectra, and we use these to discuss the average spectral properties of SLSNe-I at different spectral phases. We find that Mn II most probably contributes to the ultraviolet spectral features after maximum light, and we give a detailed study of the O II features that often characterize the early-time optical spectra of SLSNe-I. We discuss the velocity distribution of O II, finding that for some SLSNe-I this can be confined to a narrow range compared to relatively large systematic velocity shifts. Mg II and Fe II favor higher velocities than O II and C II, and we briefly discuss how this may constrain power-source models. We tentatively group objects by how well they match either SN 2011ke or PTF12dam and discuss the possibility that physically distinct events may have been previously grouped together under the SLSN-I label.
  • We use recent X-ray observations of the intracluster medium (ICM) of the galaxy group NGC 5813 to confront theoretical studies of ICM thermal evolution with the newly derived ICM properties. We argue that the ICM of the cooling flow galaxy group NGC 5813 is more likely to be heated by mixing of post-shock jets' gas residing in hot bubbles with the ICM, than by shocks or turbulent-heating. Shocks thermalize only a small fraction of their energy in the inner regions of the cooling flow; in order to adequately heat the inner part of the ICM, they would overheat the outer regions by a large factor, leading to its ejection from the group. Heating by mixing, that was found to be much more efficient than turbulent-heating and shocks-heating, hence, rescues the outer ICM of NGC 5813 from its predestined fate according to cooling flow feedback scenarios that are based on heating by shocks.
  • During the first few days after explosion, Type II supernovae (SNe) are dominated by relatively simple physics. Theoretical predictions regarding early-time SN light curves in the ultraviolet (UV) and optical bands are thus quite robust. We present, for the first time, a sample of $57$ $R$-band Type II SN light curves that are well monitored during their rise, having $>5$ detections during the first 10 days after discovery, and a well-constrained time of explosion to within $1-3$ days. We show that the energy per unit mass ($E/M$) can be deduced to roughly a factor of five by comparing early-time optical data to the model of Rabinak & Waxman (2011), while the progenitor radius cannot be determined based on $R$-band data alone. We find that Type II SN explosion energies span a range of $E/M=(0.2-20)\times 10^{51} \; \rm{erg/(10 M}_\odot$), and have a mean energy per unit mass of $\left\langle E/M \right\rangle = 0.85\times 10^{51} \; \rm{erg/(10 M}_\odot$), corrected for Malmquist bias. Assuming a small spread in progenitor masses, this indicates a large intrinsic diversity in explosion energy. Moreover, $E/M$ is positively correlated with the amount of $^{56}\rm{Ni}$ produced in the explosion, as predicted by some recent models of core-collapse SNe. We further present several empirical correlations. The peak magnitude is correlated with the decline rate ($\Delta m_{15}$), the decline rate is weakly correlated with the rise time, and the rise time is not significantly correlated with the peak magnitude. Faster declining SNe are more luminous and have longer rise times. This limits the possible power sources for such events.
  • We present the results of a Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) archival search for blue transients which lie in the magnitude range between "normal" core-collapse and superluminous supernovae (i.e. with $-21\,{\leq}M_{R\,(peak)}\,{\leq}-19$). Of the six events found after excluding all interacting Type~IIn and Ia-CSM supernovae, three (PTF09ge, 09axc and 09djl) are coincident with the centers of their hosts, one (10iam) is offset from the center, and for two (10nuj and 11glr) a precise offset can not be determined. All the central events have similar rise times to the He-rich tidal disruption candidate PS1-10jh, and the event with the best-sampled light curve also has similar colors and power-law decay. Spectroscopically, PTF09ge is He-rich, while PTF09axc and 09djl display broad hydrogen features around peak magnitude. All three central events are in low star-formation hosts, two of which are E+A galaxies. Our spectrum of the host of PS1-10jh displays similar properties. PTF10iam, the one offset event, is different photometrically and spectroscopically from the central events and its host displays a higher star formation rate. Finding no obvious evidence for ongoing galactic nuclei activity or recent star formation, we conclude that the three central transients likely arise from the tidal disruption of a star by a super-massive black hole. We compare the spectra of these events to tidal disruption candidates from the literature and find that all of these objects can be unified on a continuous scale of spectral properties. The accumulated evidence of this expanded sample strongly supports a tidal disruption origin for this class of nuclear transients.
  • Since the discovery of the unusual prototype SN 2002cx, the eponymous class of low-velocity, hydrogen-poor supernovae has grown to include at most another two dozen members identified from several heterogeneous surveys, in some cases ambiguously. Here we present the results of a systematic study of 1077 hydrogen-poor supernovae discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory, leading to nine new members of this peculiar class. Moreover we find there are two distinct subclasses based on their spectroscopic, photometric, and host galaxy properties: The "SN 2002cx-like" supernovae tend to be in later-type or more irregular hosts, have more varied and generally dimmer luminosities, have longer rise times, and lack a Ti II trough when compared to the "SN 2002es-like" supernovae. None of our objects show helium, and we counter a previous claim of two such events. We also find that these transients comprise 5.6+17-3.7% (90% confidence) of all SNe Ia, lower compared to earlier estimates. Combining our objects with the literature sample, we propose that these subclasses have two distinct physical origins.
  • A key tracer of the elusive progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is the detection of narrow blueshifted time-varying Na I D absorption lines, interpreted as evidence of circumstellar material (CSM) surrounding the progenitor system. The origin of this material is controversial, but the simplest explanation is that it results from previous mass loss in a system containing a white dwarf and a non-degenerate companion star. We present new single-epoch intermediate-resolution spectra of 17 low-redshift SNe Ia taken with XShooter on the ESO Very Large Telescope. Combining this sample with events from the literature, we confirm an excess (~20 per cent) of SNe Ia displaying blueshifted narrow Na I D absorption features compared to non-blueshifted Na I D features. The host galaxies of SNe Ia displaying blueshifted absorption profiles are skewed towards later-type galaxies, compared to SNe Ia that show no Na I D absorption, and SNe Ia displaying blueshifted narrow Na I D absorption features have broader light curves. The strength of the Na I D absorption is stronger in SNe Ia displaying blueshifted Na I D absorption features than those without blueshifted features, and the strength of the blueshifted Na I D is correlated with the B-V colour of the SN at maximum light. This strongly suggests the absorbing material is local to the SN. In the context of the progenitor systems of SNe Ia, we discuss the significance of these findings and other recent observational evidence on the nature of SN Ia progenitors. We present a summary that suggests there are at least two distinct populations of normal, cosmologically useful SNe Ia.
  • We report the discovery by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) of the transient source PTF11agg, which is distinguished by three primary characteristics: (1) bright, rapidly fading optical transient emission; (2) a faint, blue quiescent optical counterpart; and (3) an associated year-long, scintillating radio transient. We argue that these observed properties are inconsistent with any known class of Galactic transients, and instead suggest a cosmological origin. The detection of incoherent radio emission at such distances implies a large emitting region, from which we infer the presence of relativistic ejecta. The observed properties are all consistent with the population of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), marking the first time such an outburst has been discovered in the distant universe independent of a high-energy trigger. We searched for possible high-energy counterparts to PTF11agg, but found no evidence for associated prompt emission. We therefore consider three possible scenarios to account for a GRB-like afterglow without a high-energy counterpart: an "untriggered" GRB (lack of satellite coverage), an "orphan" afterglow (viewing-angle effects), and a "dirty fireball" (suppressed high-energy emission). The observed optical and radio light curves appear inconsistent with even the most basic predictions for off-axis afterglow models. The simplest explanation, then, is that PTF11agg is a normal, on-axis long-duration GRB for which the associated high-energy emission was simply missed. However, we have calculated the likelihood of such a serendipitous discovery by PTF and find that it is quite small (~ 2.6%). While not definitive, we nonetheless speculate that PTF11agg may represent a new, more common (> 4 times the on-axis GRB rate at 90% confidence) class of relativistic outbursts lacking associated high-energy emission.
  • Owing to their utility for measurements of cosmic acceleration, Type Ia supernovae (SNe) are perhaps the best-studied class of SNe, yet the progenitor systems of these explosions largely remain a mystery. A rare subclass of SNe Ia show evidence of strong interaction with their circumstellar medium (CSM), and in particular, a hydrogen-rich CSM; we refer to them as SNe Ia-CSM. In the first systematic search for such systems, we have identified 16 SNe Ia-CSM, and here we present new spectra of 13 of them. Six SNe Ia-CSM have been well-studied previously, three were previously known but are analyzed in-depth for the first time here, and seven are new discoveries from the Palomar Transient Factory. The spectra of all SNe Ia-CSM are dominated by H{\alpha} emission (with widths of ~2000 km/s) and exhibit large H{\alpha}/H{\beta} intensity ratios (perhaps due to collisional excitation of hydrogen via the SN ejecta overtaking slower-moving CSM shells); moreover, they have an almost complete lack of He I emission. They also show possible evidence of dust formation through a decrease in the red wing of H{\alpha} 75-100 d past maximum brightness, and nearly all SNe Ia-CSM exhibit strong Na I D absorption from the host galaxy. The absolute magnitudes (uncorrected for host-galaxy extinction) of SNe Ia-CSM are found to be -21.3 <= M_R <= -19 mag, and they also seem to show ultraviolet emission at early times and strong infrared emission at late times (but no detected radio or X-ray emission). Finally, the host galaxies of SNe Ia-CSM are all late-type spirals similar to the Milky Way, or dwarf irregulars like the Large Magellanic Cloud, which implies that these objects come from a relatively young stellar population. This work represents the most detailed analysis of the SN Ia-CSM class to date.
  • We present observations of the interacting transient SN 2009ip, from the start of the outburst in October 2012 until the end of the 2012 observing season. The transient reached a peak of $M_V$=-17.7 mag before fading rapidly, with a total integrated luminosity of 1.9$\times10^{49}$ erg over the period of August-December 2012. The optical and near infrared spectra are dominated by narrow emission lines, signaling a dense circumstellar environment, together with multiple components of broad emission and absorption in H and He at velocities between 0.5-1.2$\times10^4$ km s$^{-1}$\. We see no evidence for nucleosynthesized material in SN 2009ip, even in late-time pseudo-nebular spectra. We set a limit of $<$0.02 M$_{\odot}$\ on the mass of any synthesized $^{56}$Ni from the late time lightcurve. A simple model for the narrow Balmer lines is presented, and used to derive number densities for the circumstellar medium of between $\sim 10^{9}-10^{10}$ cm$^{-3}$. Our near-infrared data does not show any excess at longer wavelengths. Our last data, taken in December 2012, shows that SN 2009ip has spectroscopically evolved to something quite similar to its appearance in late 2009, albeit with higher velocities. It is possible that neither of the eruptive and high luminosity events of SN 2009ip were induced by a core-collapse. We show that the peak and total integrated luminosity can be due to the efficient conversion of kinetic energy from colliding ejecta, and that around 0.05-0.1 M$_{\odot}$\ of material moving at 0.5-1$\times10^4$ km s$^{-1}$\ could comfortably produce the observed luminosity. The ejection of multiple shells, lack of evidence for nucleosynthesied elements and broad nebular lines, are all consistent with the pulsational-pair instability scenario. In this case the progenitor star may still exist, and will be observed after the current outburst fades.
  • Comparing the ejecta velocities at maximum brightness and narrow circumstellar/interstellar Na D absorption line profiles of a sample of 23 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), we determine that the properties of SN Ia progenitor systems and explosions are intimately connected. As demonstrated by Sternberg et al. (2011), half of all SNe Ia with detectable Na D absorption at the host-galaxy redshift in high-resolution spectroscopy have Na D line profiles with significant blueshifted absorption relative to the strongest absorption component, which indicates that a large fraction of SN Ia progenitor systems have strong outflows. In this study, we find that SNe Ia with blueshifted circumstellar/interstellar absorption systematically have higher ejecta velocities and redder colors at maximum brightness relative to the rest of the SN Ia population. This result is robust at a 98.9-99.8% confidence level, providing the first link between the progenitor systems and properties of the explosion. This finding is further evidence that the outflow scenario is the correct interpretation of the blueshifted Na D absorption, adding additional confirmation that some SNe Ia are produced from a single-degenerate progenitor channel. An additional implication is that either SN Ia progenitor systems have highly asymmetric outflows that are also aligned with the SN explosion or SNe Ia come from a variety of progenitor systems where SNe Ia from systems with strong outflows tend to have more kinetic energy per unit mass than those from systems with weak or no outflows.
  • From the first two seasons of the Palomar Transient Factory, we identify three peculiar transients (PTF09dav, PTF10iuv, PTF11bij) with five distinguishing characteristics: peak luminosity in the gap between novae and supernovae (M_R = 15.5 to -16.5), rapid photometric evolution (rise-time ~12--15 days), large photospheric velocities (~6000 to 11000 km/s), early spectroscopic evolution into nebular phase (~1 to 3 months) and peculiar nebular spectra dominated by Calcium. We also culled the extensive decade-long Lick Observatory Supernova Search database and identified an additional member of this group, SN 2007ke. Our choice of photometric and spectroscopic properties was motivated by SN 2005E (Perets et al. 2010). To our surprise, as in the case of SN 2005E, all four members of this group are also clearly offset from the bulk of their host galaxy. Given the well-sampled early and late-time light curves, we derive ejecta masses in the range of 0.4--0.7 Msun. Spectroscopically, we find that there may be a diversity in the photospheric phase, but the commonality is in the unusual nebular spectra. Our extensive follow-up observations rule out standard thermonuclear and standard core-collapse explosions for this class of "Calcium-rich gap" transients. If the progenitor is a white dwarf, we are likely seeing a detonation of the white dwarf core and perhaps, even shockfront interaction with a previously ejected nova shell. In the less likely scenario of a massive star progenitor, a very non-standard channel specific to a low-metallicity environment needs to be invoked (e.g., ejecta fallback leading to black hole formation). Detection (or lack thereof) of a faint underlying host (dwarf galaxy, cluster) will provide a crucial and decisive diagnostic to choose between these alternatives.
  • Type Ia supernovae are key tools for measuring distances on a cosmic scale. They are generally thought to be the thermonuclear explosion of an accreting white dwarf in a close binary system. The nature of the mass donor is still uncertain. In the single-degenerate model it is a main-sequence star or an evolved star, whereas in the double-degenerate model it is another white dwarf. We show that the velocity structure of absorbing material along the line of sight to 35 type Ia supernovae tends to be blueshifted. These structures are likely signatures of gas outflows from the supernova progenitor systems. Thus many type Ia supernovae in nearby spiral galaxies may originate in single-degenerate systems.
  • PTF10ops is a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia), whose lightcurve and spectral properties place it outside the current SN Ia subtype classifications. Its spectra display the characteristic lines of subluminous SNe Ia, but it has a normal-width lightcurve with a long rise-time, typical of normal luminosity SNe Ia. The early-time optical spectra of PTF10ops were modelled using a spectral fitting code and found to have all the lines typically seen in subluminous SNe Ia, without the need to invoke more uncommon elements. The host galaxy environment of PTF10ops is also unusual with no galaxy detected at the position of the SN down to an absolute limiting magnitude of r \geq -12.0 mag, but a very massive galaxy is present at a separation of ~148 kpc and at the same redshift as suggested by the SN spectral features. The progenitor of PTF10ops is most likely a very old star, possibly in a low metallicity environment, which affects its explosion mechanism and observational characteristics. PTF10ops does not easily fit into any of the current models of either subluminous or normal SN Ia progenitor channels.
  • We present extensive photometric and spectroscopic observations of PTF1 J071912.13+485834.0, an outbursting AM CVn system discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). AM CVn systems are stellar binaries with some of the smallest separations known and orbital periods ranging from 5 to 65 minutes. They are believed to be composed of a white dwarf accretor and a (semi)-degenerate He-rich donor and are considered to be the helium equivalents of Cataclysmic Variables. We have spectroscopically and photometrically identified an orbital period of 26.77 \pm 0.02 minutes for PTF1 J071912.13+485834.0 and found a super-outburst recurrence time of greater than 65 days along with the presence of "normal" outbursts - rarely seen in AM CVn systems but well known in super-outbursting Cataclysmic Variables. We present a long-term light curve over two super-cycles as well as high cadence photometry of both outburst and quiescent stages, both of which show clear variability. We also compare both the outburst and quiescent spectra of PTF1 J071912.13+485834.0 to other known AM CVn systems, and use the quiescent phase-resolved spectroscopy to determine the origin of the photometric variability. Finally, we draw parallels between the different subclasses of SU UMa-type Cataclysmic Variables and outbursting AM CVn systems. We conclude by predicting that the Palomar Transient Factory may more than double the number of outbursting AM CVn systems known, which would greatly increase our understanding of AM CVn systems.
  • On May 31, 2011 UT a supernova (SN) exploded in the nearby galaxy M51 (the Whirlpool Galaxy). We discovered this event using small telescopes equipped with CCD cameras, as well as by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) survey, and rapidly confirmed it to be a Type II supernova. Our early light curve and spectroscopy indicates that PTF11eon resulted from the explosion of a relatively compact progenitor star as evidenced by the rapid shock-breakout cooling seen in the light curve, the relatively low temperature in early-time spectra and the prompt appearance of low-ionization spectral features. The spectra of PTF11eon are dominated by H lines out to day 10 after explosion, but initial signs of He appear to be present. Assuming that He lines continue to develop in the near future, this SN is likely a member of the cIIb (compact IIb; Chevalier and Soderberg 2010) class, with progenitor radius larger than that of SN 2008ax and smaller than the eIIb (extended IIb) SN 1993J progenitor. Our data imply that the object identified in pre-explosion Hubble Space Telescope images at the SN location is possibly a companion to the progenitor or a blended source, and not the progenitor star itself, as its radius (~10^13 cm) would be highly inconsistent with constraints from our post-explosion photometric and spectroscopic data.
  • The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) is an optical wide-field variability survey carried out using a camera with a 7.8 square degree field of view mounted on the 48-in Oschin Schmidt telescope at Palomar Observatory. One of the key goals of this survey is to conduct high-cadence monitoring of the sky in order to detect optical transient sources shortly after they occur. Here, we describe the real-time capabilities of the PTF and our related rapid multiwavelength follow-up programs, extending from the radio to the gamma-ray bands. We present as a case study observations of the optical transient PTF10vdl (SN 2010id), revealed to be a very young core-collapse (Type II-P) supernova having a remarkably low luminosity. Our results demonstrate that the PTF now provides for optical transients the real-time discovery and rapid-response follow-up capabilities previously reserved only for high-energy transients like gamma-ray bursts.
  • For the recent four years we have been studying feedback heating in cooling flow (CF) clusters by AGN activity that inflate bubbles by jets; this short contribution to a meeting summarizes our main results. To achieve our results we had to self-consistently inflate the bubbles with jets, rather than inject them artificially. Our main results are as follows (1) Feedback mechanisms that are based on Bondi accretion fail. Instead, the accretion to the central super-massive black hole (SMBH) is in the form of cold dense blobs that fall-in from an extended region. (2) Slow massive wide (SMW) jets, or rapidly precessing jets, can inflate bubbles similar to those observed in CF clusters. (3) Contrary to some claims in the literature, the inflated bubbles are stable for a relatively long time, becoming unstable only at later times. (4) A single bubble inflation episode excites multiple sound waves and shocks. These can then heat the intracluster medium (ICM). (5) Mixing of the bubble material to the ICM is efficient, and can serve as a main heating channel. (6) The heating processes work in all directions, and can explain the heating of the ICM in CF in clusters and in galaxies.
  • By conducting axisymmetrical hydrodynamical numerical simulations (2.5 dimensional code) we show that slow, massive, wide jets can reproduce the morphology of the huge X-ray deficient bubble pair in the cluster of galaxies MS0735+7421. The total energy of the jets, composed of the energy in the bubble pair and in the shock wave, is constraint by observations conducted by McNamara et al. (2009) to be ~10^{62}erg. We show that two opposite jets that are active for ~100Myr, each with a launching half opening angle of ~70 degrees, an initial velocity of ~0.1c, and a total mass loss rate of the two jets of ~100 Mo/year, can account for the observed morphology. Rapidly precessing narrow jets can be used instead of wide jets. In our model the cluster suffered from a cooling catastrophe ~100Myr ago. Most of the mass that cooled, ~10^{10} Mo, was expelled back to the intracluster medium (ICM) by the AGN activity and is inside the bubbles now, ~10% formed stars, and ~10% of the cold gas was accreted by the central black hole and was the source of the outburst energy. This type of activity is similar to that expected to occur in galaxy formation.
  • We show that repeated sound waves in the intracluster medium (ICM) can be excited by a single inflation episode of an opposite bubble pair. To reproduce this behavior in numerical simulations the bubbles should be inflated by jets, rather than being injected artificially. The multiple sound waves are excited by the motion of the bubble-ICM boundary that is caused by vortices inside the inflated bubbles and the backflow (`cocoon') of the ICM around the bubble. These sound waves form a structure that can account for the ripples observed in the Perseus cooling flow cluster. We inflate the bubbles using slow massive jets, with either a wide opening angle or that are precessing. The jets are slow in the sense that they are highly sub-relativistic, $v_j \sim 0.01c-0.1c$, and they are massive in the sense that the pair of bubbles carry back to the ICM a large fraction of the cooling mass, i.e., $\sim 1-50 M_\odot \yr^{-1}$. We use a two-dimensional axisymmetric (referred to as 2.5D) hydrodynamical numerical code (VH-1).
  • We conduct two-dimensional axisymmetric (referred to as 2.5D) hydrodynamical numerical simulations of bubble evolution in clusters of galaxies. We inflate bubbles using slow, massive jets with a wide opening angle, and follow their evolution as they rise through the intra-cluster medium (ICM). We find that these jet-inflated bubbles are quite stable, and can reach large distances in the cluster while still maintaining their basic structure. The stability of the jet-inflated bubble comes mainly from the dense shell that forms around it during it's inflation stage, and from the outward momentum of the bubble and the shell. On the contrary, bubbles that are inserted by hand onto the grid and not inflated by a jet, i.e., an artificial bubble, lack these stabilizing factors, therefore, they are rapidly destroyed. The stability of the jet-inflated bubble removes the demand for stabilizing magnetic fields in the bubble.
  • We conduct hydrodynamical numerical simulations and find that precessing massive slow jets can inflate fat bubbles, i.e., more or less spherical bubbles, that are attached to the center of clusters of galaxies. To inflate a fat bubble the jet should precess fast. The precessing angle $\theta$ should be large, or change over a large range $ 0 \le \theta \le \theta_{\max} \sim 30-70 ^\circ$ (depending also on other parameters), where $\theta=0$ is the symmetry axis. The constraints on the velocity and mass outflow rate are similar to those on wide jets to inflate fat bubbles. The velocity should be $v_j \sim 10^4 \kms$, and the mass loss rate of the two jets should be $ 2 \dot M_j \simeq 1-50 \dot M_\odot \yr^{-1} $. These results, and our results from a previous paper dealing with slow wide jets, support the claim that a large fraction of the feedback heating in cooling flow clusters and in the processes of galaxy formation is done by slow massive jets.
  • We conduct two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of jets expanding in the intra-cluster medium (ICM). We find that for a fat, i.e. more or less spherical, bubble attached to the center to be formed the jet should have high momentum flux and a large opening angle. Typically, the half opening angle should be >50 degrees, and the large momentum flux requires a jet speed of \~10,000 km/sec. The inflation process involves vortices and local instabilities which mix some ICM with the hot bubble. These results predict that most of the gas inside the bubble has a temperature of 3x10^8<T<3x10^9 K, and that large quantities of the cooling gas in cooling flow clusters are expelled back to the intra-cluster medium, and heated up. The magnetic fields and relativistic electrons that produce the synchrotron radio emission might be formed in the shock wave of the jet.