• We propose a new geometric approach to describe the qualitative dynamics of chemical reactions networks. By this method we identify metastable regimes, defined as low dimensional regions of the phase space close to which the dynamics is much slower compared to the rest of the phase space. Given the network topology and the orders of magnitude of kinetic parameters, the number of such metastable regimes is finite. The dynamics of the network can be described as a sequence of jumps from one metastable regime to another. We show that a geometrically computed connectivity graph restricts the set of possible jumps. We also provide finite state machine (Markov chain) models for such dynamic changes. Applied to signal transduction models, our approach unravels dynamical and functional capacities of signaling pathways, as well as parameters responsible for specificity of the pathway response. In particular, for a model of TGF$\beta$ signalling, we find that the ratio of TGFBR1 to TGFBR2 concentrations can be used to discriminate between metastable regimes. Using expression data from the NCI60 panel of human tumor cell lines, we show that aggressive and non-aggressive tumour cell lines function in different metastable regimes and can be distinguished by measuring the relative concentrations of receptors of the two types.
  • We discuss the symbolic dynamics of biochemical networks with separate timescales. We show that symbolic dynamics of monomolecular reaction networks with separated rate constants can be described by deterministic, acyclic automata with a number of states that is inferior to the number of biochemical species. For nonlinear pathways, we propose a general approach to approximate their dynamics by finite state machines working on the metastable states of the network (long life states where the system has slow dynamics). For networks with polynomial rate functions we propose to compute metastable states as solutions of the tropical equilibration problem. Tropical equilibrations are defined by the equality of at least two dominant monomials of opposite signs in the differential equations of each dynamic variable. In algebraic geometry, tropical equilibrations are tantamount to tropical prevarieties, that are finite intersections of tropical hypersurfaces.
  • Background: Qualitative frameworks, especially those based on the logical discrete formalism, are increasingly used to model regulatory and signalling networks. A major advantage of these frameworks is that they do not require precise quantitative data, and that they are well-suited for studies of large networks. While numerous groups have developed specific computational tools that provide original methods to analyse qualitative models, a standard format to exchange qualitative models has been missing. Results: We present the System Biology Markup Language (SBML) Qualitative Models Package ("qual"), an extension of the SBML Level 3 standard designed for computer representation of qualitative models of biological networks. We demonstrate the interoperability of models via SBML qual through the analysis of a specific signalling network by three independent software tools. Furthermore, the cooperative development of the SBML qual format paved the way for the development of LogicalModel, an open-source model library, which will facilitate the adoption of the format as well as the collaborative development of algorithms to analyze qualitative models. Conclusion: SBML qual allows the exchange of qualitative models among a number of complementary software tools. SBML qual has the potential to promote collaborative work on the development of novel computational approaches, as well as on the specification and the analysis of comprehensive qualitative models of regulatory and signalling networks.