• We investigate the galaxy quenching process at intermediate redshift using a sample of $\sim4400$ galaxies with $M_{\ast} > 10^{9}M_{\odot}$ between redshift 0.5 and 1.0 in all five CANDELS fields. We divide this sample, using the integrated specific star formation rate (sSFR), into four sub-groups: star-forming galaxies (SFGs) above and below the ridge of the star-forming main sequence (SFMS), transition galaxies and quiescent galaxies. We study their $UVI$ ($U-V$ versus $V-I$) color gradients to infer their sSFR gradients out to twice effective radii. We show that on average both star-forming and transition galaxies at all masses are not fully quenched at any radii, whereas quiescent galaxies are fully quenched at all radii. We find that at low masses ($M_{\ast} = 10^{9}-10^{10}M_{\odot}$) SFGs both above and below the SFMS ridge generally have flat sSFR profiles, whereas the transition galaxies at the same masses generally have sSFRs that are more suppressed in their outskirts. In contrast, at high masses ($M_{\ast} > 10^{10.5}M_{\odot}$), SFGs above and below the SFMS ridge and transition galaxies generally have varying degrees of more centrally-suppressed sSFRs relative to their outskirts. These findings indicate that at $z\sim~0.5-1.0$ the main galaxy quenching mode depends on its already formed stellar mass, exhibiting a transition from "the outside-in" at $M_{\ast} \leq 10^{10}M_{\odot}$ to "the inside-out" at $M_{\ast} > 10^{10.5}M_{\odot}$. In other words, our findings support that internal processes dominate the quenching of massive galaxies, whereas external processes dominate the quenching of low-mass galaxies.
  • This is the first in a series of papers examining the demographics of star-forming galaxies at $0.2<z<2.5$ in CANDELS. We study 9,100 galaxies from GOODS-S and UDS having published values of redshifts, masses, star-formation rates (SFRs), and dust attenuation ($A_V$) derived from UV-optical SED fitting. In agreement with previous works, we find that the $UVJ$ colors of a galaxy are closely correlated with its specific star-formation rate (SSFR) and $A_V$. We define rotated $UVJ$ coordinate axes, termed $S_\mathrm{SED}$ and $C_\mathrm{SED}$, that are parallel and perpendicular to the star-forming sequence and derive a quantitative calibration that predicts SSFR from $C_\mathrm{SED}$ with an accuracy of ~0.2 dex. SFRs from UV-optical fitting and from UV+IR values based on Spitzer/MIPS 24 $\mu\mathrm{m}$ agree well overall, but systematic differences of order 0.2 dex exist at high and low redshifts. A novel plotting scheme conveys the evolution of multiple galaxy properties simultaneously, and dust growth, as well as star-formation decline and quenching, exhibit "mass-accelerated evolution" ("downsizing"). A population of transition galaxies below the star-forming main sequence is identified. These objects are located between star-forming and quiescent galaxies in $UVJ$ space and have lower $A_V$ and smaller radii than galaxies on the main sequence. Their properties are consistent with their being in transit between the two regions. The relative numbers of quenched, transition, and star-forming galaxies are given as a function of mass and redshift.
  • As part of our long-term campaign to understand how cold streams feed massive galaxies at high redshift, we study the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) of a supersonic, cold, dense gas stream as it penetrates through a hot, dilute circumgalactic medium (CGM). A linear analysis (Paper I) showed that, for realistic conditions, KHI may produce nonlinear perturbations to the stream during infall. Therefore, we proceed here to study the nonlinear stage of KHI, still limited to a two-dimensional slab with no radiative cooling or gravity. Using analytic models and numerical simulations, we examine stream breakup, deceleration and heating via surface modes and body modes. The relevant parameters are the density contrast between stream and CGM ($\delta$), the Mach number of the stream velocity with respect to the CGM ($M_{\rm b}$) and the stream radius relative to the halo virial radius ($R_{\rm s}/R_{\rm v}$). We find that sufficiently thin streams disintegrate prior to reaching the central galaxy. The condition for breakup ranges from $R_{\rm s} < 0.03 R_{\rm v}$ for $(M_{\rm b} \sim 0.75, \delta \sim 10)$ to $R_{\rm s} < 0.003 R_{\rm v}$ for $(M_{\rm b} \sim 2.25, \delta \sim 100)$. However, due to the large stream inertia, KHI has only a small effect on the stream inflow rate and a small contribution to heating and subsequent Lyman-$\alpha$ cooling emission.
  • Using an isolated Milky Way-mass galaxy simulation, we compare results from 9 state-of-the-art gravito-hydrodynamics codes widely used in the numerical community. We utilize the infrastructure we have built for the AGORA High-resolution Galaxy Simulations Comparison Project. This includes the common disk initial conditions, common physics models (e.g., radiative cooling and UV background by the standardized package Grackle) and common analysis toolkit yt, all of which are publicly available. Subgrid physics models such as Jeans pressure floor, star formation, supernova feedback energy, and metal production are carefully constrained across code platforms. With numerical accuracy that resolves the disk scale height, we find that the codes overall agree well with one another in many dimensions including: gas and stellar surface densities, rotation curves, velocity dispersions, density and temperature distribution functions, disk vertical heights, stellar clumps, star formation rates, and Kennicutt-Schmidt relations. Quantities such as velocity dispersions are very robust (agreement within a few tens of percent at all radii) while measures like newly-formed stellar clump mass functions show more significant variation (difference by up to a factor of ~3). Systematic differences exist, for example, between mesh-based and particle-based codes in the low density region, and between more diffusive and less diffusive schemes in the high density tail of the density distribution. Yet intrinsic code differences are generally small compared to the variations in numerical implementations of the common subgrid physics such as supernova feedback. Our experiment reassures that, if adequately designed in accordance with our proposed common parameters, results of a modern high-resolution galaxy formation simulation are more sensitive to input physics than to intrinsic differences in numerical schemes.
  • In the local Universe, the existence of very young galaxies (VYGs), having formed at least half their stellar mass in the last 1 Gyr, is debated. We predict the present-day fraction of VYGs among central galaxies as a function of galaxy stellar mass. For this, we apply to high mass resolution Monte-Carlo halo merger trees (MCHMTs) three (one) analytical models of galaxy formation, where the ratio of stellar to halo mass (mass growth rate) is a function of halo mass and redshift. Galaxy merging is delayed until orbital decay by dynamical friction. With starbursts associated with halo mergers, our models predict typically one percent of VYGs up to galaxy masses of $10^{10}$ M$_\odot$, falling rapidly at higher masses, and VYGs are usually associated with recent major mergers of their haloes. Without these starbursts, two of the models have VYG fractions reduced by 1 or 2 dex at low or intermediate stellar masses, and VYGs are rarely associated with major halo mergers. In comparison, the state-of-the-art semi-analytical model (SAM) of Henriques et al. produces only 0.01% of VYGs at intermediate masses. Finally, the Menci et al. SAM run on MCMHTs with Warm Dark Matter cosmology generates 10 times more VYGs at masses below $10^8$ M$_\odot$ than when run with Cold Dark Matter. The wide range in these VYG fractions illustrates the usefulness of VYGs to constrain both galaxy formation and cosmological models.
  • We find, using cosmological simulations of galaxy clusters, that the hot X-ray emitting intra-cluster medium (ICM) enclosed within the outer accretion shock extends out to $R_{\rm shock}\sim(2 - 3) R_{\rm vir}$, where $R_{\rm vir}$ is the standard virial radius of the halo. Using a simple analytic model for satellite galaxies in the cluster, we evaluate the effect of ram pressure stripping on the gas in the inner discs and in the haloes at different distances from the cluster centre. We find that significant removal of star-forming disc gas occurs only at $r \lesssim 0.5 R_{\rm vir}$, while gas removal from the satellite halo is more effective and can occur when the satellite is found between $ R_{\rm vir}$ and $R_{\rm shock}$. Removal of halo gas sets the stage for quenching of the star formation by starvation over $2\textrm{--}3\,\mathrm{Gyr}$, prior to the satellite entry to the inner cluster halo. This scenario explains the presence of quenched galaxies, preferentially discs, at the outskirts of galaxy clusters, and the delayed quenching of satellites compared to central galaxies.
  • Cold Fronts and shocks are hallmarks of the complex intra-cluster medium (ICM) in galaxy clusters. They are thought to occur due to gas motions within the ICM and are often attributed to galaxy mergers within the cluster. Using hydro-cosmological simulations of clusters of galaxies, we show that collisions of inflowing gas streams, seen to penetrate to the very centre of about half the clusters, offer an additional mechanism for the formation of shocks and cold fronts in cluster cores. Unlike episodic merger events, a gas stream inflow persists over a period of several Gyrs and it could generate a particular pattern of multiple cold fronts and shocks.
  • Studying giant star-forming clumps in distant galaxies is important to understand galaxy formation and evolution. At present, however, observers and theorists have not reached a consensus on whether the observed "clumps" in distant galaxies are the same phenomenon that is seen in simulations. In this paper, as a step to establish a benchmark of direct comparisons between observations and theories, we publish a sample of clumps constructed to represent the commonly observed "clumps" in the literature. This sample contains 3193 clumps detected from 1270 galaxies at $0.5 \leq z < 3.0$. The clumps are detected from rest-frame UV images, as described in our previous paper. Their physical properties, e.g., rest-frame color, stellar mass (M*), star formation rate (SFR), age, and dust extinction, are measured by fitting the spectral energy distribution (SED) to synthetic stellar population models. We carefully test the procedures of measuring clump properties, especially the method of subtracting background fluxes from the diffuse component of galaxies. With our fiducial background subtraction, we find a radial clump U-V color variation, where clumps close to galactic centers are redder than those in outskirts. The slope of the color gradient (clump color as a function of their galactocentric distance scaled by the semi-major axis of galaxies) changes with redshift and M* of the host galaxies: at a fixed M*, the slope becomes steeper toward low redshift, and at a fixed redshift, it becomes slightly steeper with M*. Based on our SED-fitting, this observed color gradient can be explained by a combination of a negative age gradient, a negative E(B-V) gradient, and a positive specific star formation rate gradient of the clumps. We also find that the color gradients of clumps are steeper than those of intra-clump regions. [Abridged]
  • We examine the fraction of massive ($M_{*}>10^{10} M_{\odot}$), compact star-forming galaxies (cSFGs) that host an active galactic nucleus (AGN) at $z\sim2$. These cSFGs are likely the direct progenitors of the compact quiescent galaxies observed at this epoch, which are the first population of passive galaxies to appear in large numbers in the early Universe. We identify cSFGs that host an AGN using a combination of Hubble WFC3 imaging and Chandra X-ray observations in four fields: the Chandra Deep Fields, the Extended Groth Strip, and the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey field. We find that $39.2^{+3.9}_{-3.6}$\% (65/166) of cSFGs at $1.4<z<3.0$ host an X-ray detected AGN. This fraction is 3.2 times higher than the incidence of AGN in extended star-forming galaxies with similar masses at these redshifts. This difference is significant at the $6.2\sigma$ level. Our results are consistent with models in which cSFGs are formed through a dissipative contraction that triggers a compact starburst and concurrent growth of the central black hole. We also discuss our findings in the context of cosmological galaxy evolution simulations that require feedback energy to rapidly quench cSFGs. We show that the AGN fraction peaks precisely where energy injection is needed to reproduce the decline in the number density of cSFGs with redshift. Our results suggest that the first abundant population of massive, quenched galaxies emerged directly following a phase of elevated supermassive black hole growth and further hints at a possible connection between AGN and the rapid quenching of star formation in these galaxies.
  • We study galactic star-formation activity as a function of environment and stellar mass over 0.5<z<2.0 using the FourStar Galaxy Evolution (ZFOURGE) survey. We estimate the galaxy environment using a Bayesian-motivated measure of the distance to the third nearest neighbor for galaxies to the stellar mass completeness of our survey, $\log(M/M_\odot)>9 (9.5)$ at z=1.3 (2.0). This method, when applied to a mock catalog with the photometric-redshift precision ($\sigma_z / (1+z) \lesssim 0.02$), recovers galaxies in low- and high-density environments accurately. We quantify the environmental quenching efficiency, and show that at z> 0.5 it depends on galaxy stellar mass, demonstrating that the effects of quenching related to (stellar) mass and environment are not separable. In high-density environments, the mass and environmental quenching efficiencies are comparable for massive galaxies ($\log (M/M_\odot)\gtrsim$ 10.5) at all redshifts. For lower mass galaxies ($\log (M/M)_\odot) \lesssim$ 10), the environmental quenching efficiency is very low at $z\gtrsim$ 1.5, but increases rapidly with decreasing redshift. Environmental quenching can account for nearly all quiescent lower mass galaxies ($\log(M/M_\odot) \sim$ 9-10), which appear primarily at $z\lesssim$ 1.0. The morphologies of lower mass quiescent galaxies are inconsistent with those expected of recently quenched star-forming galaxies. Some environmental process must transform the morphologies on similar timescales as the environmental quenching itself. The evolution of the environmental quenching favors models that combine gas starvation (as galaxies become satellites) with gas exhaustion through star-formation and outflows ("overconsumption"), and additional processes such as galaxy interactions, tidal stripping and disk fading to account for the morphological differences between the quiescent and star-forming galaxy populations.
  • We explore observational and theoretical constraints on how galaxies might transition between the "star-forming main sequence" (SFMS) and varying "degrees of quiescence" out to $z=3$. Our analysis is focused on galaxies with stellar mass $M_*>10^{10}M_{\odot}$, and is enabled by GAMA and CANDELS observations, a semi-analytic model (SAM) of galaxy formation, and a cosmological hydrodynamical "zoom in" simulation with momentum-driven AGN feedback. In both the observations and the SAM, transition galaxies tend to have intermediate S\'ersic indices, half-light radii, and surface stellar mass densities compared to star-forming and quiescent galaxies out to $z=3$. We place an observational upper limit on the average population transition timescale as a function of redshift, finding that the average high-redshift galaxy is on a "fast track" for quenching whereas the average low-redshift galaxy is on a "slow track" for quenching. We qualitatively identify four physical origin scenarios for transition galaxies in the SAM: oscillations on the SFMS, slow quenching, fast quenching, and rejuvenation. Quenching timescales in both the SAM and the hydrodynamical simulation are not fast enough to reproduce the quiescent population that we observe at $z\sim3$. In the SAM, we do not find a clear-cut morphological dependence of quenching timescales, but we do predict that the mean stellar ages, cold gas fractions, SMBH masses, and halo masses of transition galaxies tend to be intermediate relative to those of star-forming and quiescent galaxies at $z<3$.
  • We investigate the origin of the evolution of the population-averaged central stellar mass density ($\Sigma_1$) of quiescent galaxies (QGs) by probing the relation between stellar age and $\Sigma_1$ at $z\sim0$. We use the Zurich ENvironmental Study (ZENS), which is a survey of galaxy groups with a large fraction of satellite galaxies. QGs shape a narrow locus in the $\Sigma_1-M_{\star}$ plane, which we refer to as $\Sigma_1$ ridgeline. Colors of ($B-I$) and ($I-J$) are used to divide QGs into three age categories: young ($<2~\mathrm{Gyr}$), intermediate ($2-4~\mathrm{Gyr}$), and old ($>4~\mathrm{Gyr}$). At fixed stellar mass, old QGs on the $\Sigma_1$ ridgeline have higher $\Sigma_1$ than young QGs. This shows that galaxies landing on the $\Sigma_1$ ridgeline at later epochs arrive with lower $\Sigma_1$, which drives the zeropoint of the ridgeline down with time. We compare the present-day zeropoint of the oldest population at $z=0$ with the zeropoint of the quiescent population 4 Gyr back in time, at $z=0.37$. These zeropoints are identical, showing that the intrinsic evolution of individual galaxies after they arrive on the $\Sigma_1$ ridgeline must be negligible, or must evolve parallel to the ridgeline during this interval. The observed evolution of the global zeropoint of 0.07 dex over the last 4 Gyr is thus largely due to the continuous addition of newly quenched galaxies with lower $\Sigma_1$ at later times ("progenitor bias"). While these results refer to the satellite-rich ZENS sample as a whole, our work suggests a similar age-$\Sigma_1$ trend for central galaxies.
  • We investigate the environmental quenching of galaxies, especially those with stellar masses (M*)$<10^{9.5} M_\odot$, beyond the local universe. Essentially all local low-mass quenched galaxies (QGs) are believed to live close to massive central galaxies, which is a demonstration of environmental quenching. We use CANDELS data to test {\it whether or not} such a dwarf QG--massive central galaxy connection exists beyond the local universe. To this purpose, we only need a statistically representative, rather than a complete, sample of low-mass galaxies, which enables our study to $z\gtrsim1.5$. For each low-mass galaxy, we measure the projected distance ($d_{proj}$) to its nearest massive neighbor (M*$>10^{10.5} M_\odot$) within a redshift range. At a given redshift and M*, the environmental quenching effect is considered to be observed if the $d_{proj}$ distribution of QGs ($d_{proj}^Q$) is significantly skewed toward lower values than that of star-forming galaxies ($d_{proj}^{SF}$). For galaxies with $10^{8} M_\odot < M* < 10^{10} M_\odot$, such a difference between $d_{proj}^Q$ and $d_{proj}^{SF}$ is detected up to $z\sim1$. Also, about 10\% of the quenched galaxies in our sample are located between two and four virial radii ($R_{Vir}$) of the massive halos. The median projected distance from low-mass QGs to their massive neighbors, $d_{proj}^Q / R_{Vir}$, decreases with satellite M* at $M* \lesssim 10^{9.5} M_\odot$, but increases with satellite M* at $M* \gtrsim 10^{9.5} M_\odot$. This trend suggests a smooth, if any, transition of the quenching timescale around $M* \sim 10^{9.5} M_\odot$ at $0.5<z<1.0$.
  • We explore empirical constraints on the statistical relationship between the radial size of galaxies and the radius of their host dark matter halos from $z\sim 0.1$--3 using the GAMA and CANDELS surveys. We map dark matter halo mass to galaxy stellar mass using relationships from abundance matching, applied to the Bolshoi-Planck dissipationless N-body simulation. We define SRHR$\equiv r_e/R_h$ as the ratio of galaxy radius to halo virial radius, and SRHR$\lambda \equiv r_e/(\lambda R_h)$ as the ratio of galaxy radius to halo spin parameter times halo radius. At $z\sim 0.1$, we find an average value of SRHR $\simeq 0.018$ and SRHR$\lambda \simeq 0.5$ with very little dependence on stellar mass. SRHR and SRHR$\lambda$ have a weak dependence on cosmic time since $z\sim 3$. SRHR shows a mild decrease over cosmic time for low mass galaxies, but increases slightly or does not evolve for more massive galaxies. We find hints that at high redshift ($z\sim 2$--3), SRHR$\lambda$ is lower for more massive galaxies, while it shows no significant dependence on stellar mass at $z\lesssim 0.5$. We find that for both the GAMA and CANDELS samples, at all redshifts from $z\sim 0.1$--3, the observed conditional size distribution in stellar mass bins is remarkably similar to the conditional distribution of $\lambda R_h$. We discuss the physical interpretation and implications of these results.
  • High-resolution simulations of supermassive black holes in isolated galaxies have suggested the importance of short (~10 Myr) episodes of rapid accretion caused by interactions between the black hole and massive dense clouds within the host. Accretion of such clouds could potentially provide the dominant source for black hole growth in high-z galaxies, but it remains unresolved in cosmological simulations. Using a stochastic subgrid model calibrated by high-resolution isolated galaxy simulations, we investigate the impact that variability in black hole accretion rates has on black hole growth and the evolution of the host galaxy. We find this clumpy accretion to more efficiently fuel high-redshift black hole growth. This increased mass allows for more rapid accretion even in the absence of high-density clumps, compounding the effect and resulting in substantially faster overall black hole growth. This increased growth allows the black hole to efficiently evacuate gas from the central region of the galaxy, driving strong winds up to ~2500 km/s, producing outflows ~10x stronger than the smooth accretion case, suppressing the inflow of gas onto the host galaxy, and suppressing the star formation within the galaxy by as much as a factor of two. This suggests that the proper incorporation of variability is a key factor in the co-evolution between black holes and their hosts.
  • We present useful functions for the profiles of dark-matter (DM) haloes with a free inner slope, from cusps to cores, where the profiles of density, mass-velocity and potential are simple analytic expressions. Analytic velocity is obtained by expressing the mean density as a simple functional form, and deriving the local density by differentiation. The function involves four shape parameters, with only two or three free: a concentration parameter $c$, inner and outer asymptotic slopes $\alpha$ and $\bar{\gamma}$, and a middle shape parameter $\beta$. Analytic expressions for the potential and velocity dispersion exist for $\bar{\gamma}=3$ and for $\beta$ a natural number. We match the models to the DM haloes in cosmological simulations, with and without baryons, ranging from steep cusps to flat cores. Excellent fits are obtained with three free parameters ($c$, $\alpha$, $\bar{\gamma}$) and $\beta=2$. For an analytic potential, similar fits are obtained for $\bar{\gamma}=3$ and $\beta=2$ with only two free parameters ($c$, $\alpha$); this is our favorite model. A linear combination of two such profiles, with an additional free concentration parameter, provides excellent fits also for $\beta=1$, where the expressions are simpler. The fit quality is comparable to non-analytic popular models. An analytic potential is useful for modeling the inner-halo evolution due to gas inflows and outflows, studying environmental effects on the outer halo, and generating halo potentials or initial conditions for simulations. The analytic velocity can quantify simulated and observed rotation curves without numerical integrations.
  • We study how properties of discrete dark matter halos depend on halo environment, characterized by the mass density around the halos on scales from 0.5 to 16 $h^{-1}{\rm Mpc}$. We find that low mass halos (those less massive than the characteristic mass $M_{\rm C}$ of halos collapsing at a given epoch) in high-density environments have lower accretion rates, lower spins, higher concentrations, and rounder shapes than halos in median density environments. Halos in median and low-density environments have similar accretion rates and concentrations, but halos in low density environments have lower spins and are more elongated. Halos of a given mass in high-density regions accrete material earlier than halos of the same mass in lower-density regions. All but the most massive halos in high-density regions are losing mass (i.e., being stripped) at low redshifts, which causes artificially lowered NFW scale radii and increased concentrations. Tidal effects are also responsible for the decreasing spins of low mass halos in high density regions at low redshifts $z < 1$, by preferentially removing higher angular momentum material from halos. Halos in low-density regions have lower than average spins because they lack nearby halos whose tidal fields can spin them up. We also show that the simulation density distribution is well fit by an Extreme Value Distribution, and that the density distribution becomes broader with cosmic time.
  • We present results of a high-resolution zoom cosmological simulation of the evolution of a low-mass galaxy with a maximum velocity of V=100 km/s at z=0, using the initial conditions from the AGORA project (Kim et al. 2014). The final disc-dominated galaxy is consistent with local disc scaling relations, such as the stellar-to-halo mass relation and the baryonic Tully-Fisher. The galaxy evolves from a compact, dispersion-dominated galaxy into a rotation-dominated but dynamically hot disc in about 0.5 Gyr (from z=1.4 to z=1.2). The disc dynamically cools down for the following 7 Gyr, as the gas velocity dispersion decreases over time, in agreement with observations. The primary cause of this slow evolution of velocity dispersion in this low-mass galaxy is stellar feedback. It is related to the decline in gas fraction, and to the associated gravitational disk instability, as the disc slowly settles from a global Toomre Q>1 turbulent disc to a marginally unstable disc (Q=1).
  • Young stars typically form in star clusters, so the supernovae (SNe) they produce are clustered in space and time. This clustering of SNe may alter the momentum per SN deposited in the interstellar medium (ISM) by affecting the local ISM density, which in turn affects the cooling rate. We study the effect of multiple SNe using idealized 1D hydrodynamic simulations which explore a large parameter space of the number of SNe, and the background gas density and metallicity. The results are provided as a table and an analytic fitting formula. We find that for clusters with up to ~100 SNe the asymptotic momentum scales super-linearly with the number of SNe, resulting in a momentum per SN that can be an order of magnitude larger than for a single SN, with a maximum efficiency for clusters with 10-100 SNe. We argue that additional physical processes not included in our simulations -- self-gravity, breakout from a galactic disk, and galactic shear -- can slightly reduce the momentum enhancement from clustering, but the average momentum per SN still remains a factor of 4 larger than the isolated SN value when averaged over a realistic cluster mass function for a star-forming galaxy. We conclude with a discussion of the possible role of mixing between hot and cold gas, induced by multi-dimensional instabilities or preexisting density variations, as a limiting factor in the buildup of momentum by clustered SNe, and suggest future numerical experiments to explore these effects.
  • We address the origin of Ultra-Diffuse Galaxies (UDGs), which have stellar masses typical of dwarf galaxies but effective radii of Milky Way-sized objects. Their formation mechanism, and whether they are failed $\rm L_{\star}$ galaxies or diffuse dwarfs, are challenging issues. Using zoom-in cosmological simulations from the NIHAO project, we show that UDG analogues form naturally in medium-mass haloes due to episodes of gas outflows associated with star formation. The simulated UDGs live in isolated haloes of masses $10^{10-11}\rm M_{\odot}$, have stellar masses of $10^{7-8.5}\rm M_{\odot}$, effective radii larger than 1 kpc and dark matter cores. They show a broad range of colors, an average S\'ersic index of 0.83, a typical distribution of halo spin and concentration, and a non-negligible HI gas mass of $10^{7-9}\rm M_{\odot}$, which correlates with the extent of the galaxy. Gas availability is crucial to the internal processes that form UDGs: feedback driven gas outflows, and subsequent dark matter and stellar expansion, are the key to reproduce faint, yet unusually extended, galaxies. This scenario implies that UDGs represent a dwarf population of low surface brightness galaxies and should exist in the field. The largest isolated UDGs should contain more HI gas than less extended dwarfs of similar $\rm M_{\star}$.
  • We study the correlation of galaxy structural properties with their location relative to the SFR-M* correlation, also known as the star formation "main sequence" (SFMS), in the CANDELS and GAMA surveys and in a semi-analytic model (SAM) of galaxy formation. We first study the distribution of median Sersic index, effective radius, star formation rate (SFR) density and stellar mass density in the SFR-M* plane. We then define a redshift dependent main sequence and examine the medians of these quantities as a function of distance from this main sequence, both above (higher SFRs) and below (lower SFRs). Finally, we examine the distributions of distance from the main sequence in bins of these quantities. We find strong correlations between all of these galaxy structural properties and the distance from the SFMS, such that as we move from galaxies above the SFMS to those below it, we see a nearly monotonic trend towards higher median Sersic index, smaller radius, lower SFR density, and higher stellar density. In the semi-analytic model, bulge growth is driven by mergers and disk instabilities, and is accompanied by the growth of a supermassive black hole which can regulate or quench star formation via Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) feedback. We find that our model qualitatively reproduces the trends described above, supporting a picture in which black holes and bulges co-evolve, and AGN feedback plays a critical role in moving galaxies off of the SFMS.
  • We present a useful function for describing the profiles of dark-matter haloes with a varying asymptotic inner slope -\alpha, ranging from a cusp to a core, where the profiles of density, mass-velocity and potential are simple analytic expressions for any \alpha. The idea is to express the mean-density profile as a simple functional form, and obtain the local density by derivative. The model involves a concentration parameter c analogous to the NFW profile. More flexibility is provided by a sum of two such functions, with concentrations c_1 and c_2. An optional additional parameter is the asymptotic outer slope -\gamma, which allows more flexibility in the outskirts of haloes. For \gamma different than 3, there are analytic expressions for the profiles of density and mass-velocity but not for the potential. We match the proposed function, in different variants, to the dark-matter profiles of haloes in cosmological simulations, with and without baryons, spanning inner profiles that range from steep cusps to flat cores, and find excellent fits. The analytic potential profile is useful in modeling the evolution of the inner halo due to episodes of gas inflow and outflow. The analytic profile, especially with a free \gamma, is useful for a study of environmental effects in the outer halo. In general, these analytic profiles can serve for straightforwardly quantifying the shapes of simulated and observed rotation curves, without the need for numerical integrations.
  • Massive galaxies at high redshift are predicted to be fed from the cosmic web by narrow, dense, cold streams. These streams penetrate supersonically through the hot medium encompassed by a stable shock near the virial radius of the dark-matter halo. Our long-term goal is to explore the heating and dissipation rate of the streams and their fragmentation and possible breakup, in order to understand how galaxies are fed, and how this affects their star-formation rate and morphology. We present here the first step, where we analyze the linear Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) of a cold, dense slab or cylinder flowing through a hot, dilute medium in the transonic regime. The current analysis is limited to the adiabatic case with no gravity and assuming equal pressure in the stream and the medium. By analytically solving the linear dispersion relation, we find a transition from a dominance of the familiar rapidly growing surface modes in the subsonic regime to more slowly growing body modes in the supersonic regime. The system is parameterized by three parameters: the density contrast between the stream and the medium, the Mach number of stream velocity with respect to the medium, and the stream width with respect to the halo virial radius. We find that a realistic choice for these parameters places the streams near the mode transition, with the KHI exponential-growth time in the range 0.01-10 virial crossing times for a perturbation wavelength comparable to the stream width. We confirm our analytic predictions with idealized hydrodynamical simulations. Our linear-KHI estimates thus indicate that KHI may in principle be effective in the evolution of streams by the time they reach the galaxy. More definite conclusions await the extension of the analysis to the nonlinear regime and the inclusion of cooling, thermal conduction, the halo potential well, self-gravity and magnetic fields.
  • We study the evolution of giant clumps in high-z disc galaxies using AMR cosmological simulations at redshifts z=6-1. Our sample consists of 34 galaxies, of halo masses 10^{11}-10^{12}M_s at z=2, run with and without radiation pressure (RP) feedback from young stars. While RP has little effect on the sizes and global stability of discs, it reduces the amount of star-forming gas by a factor of ~2, leading to a decrease in stellar mass by a similar factor by z~2. Both samples undergo violent disc instability (VDI) and form giant clumps of masses 10^7-10^9M_s at a similar rate, though RP significantly reduces the number of long-lived clumps. When RP is (not) included, clumps with circular velocity <40(20)km/s, baryonic surface density <200(100)M_s/pc^2 and baryonic mass <10^{8.2}(10^{7.3})M_s are short-lived, disrupted in a few free-fall times. The more massive and dense clumps survive and migrate toward the disc centre over a few disc orbital times. In the RP simulations, the distribution of clump masses and star-formation rates (SFRs) normalized to their host disc is very similar at all redshifts. They exhibit a truncated power-law with a slope slightly shallower than -2. Short-lived clumps preferentially have young stellar ages, low masses, high gas fractions and specific SFRs (sSFR), and they tend to populate the outer disc. The sSFR of massive, long-lived clumps declines with age as they migrate towards the disc centre, producing gradients in mass, stellar age, gas fraction, sSFR and metallicity that distinguish them from short-lived clumps. Ex situ mergers make up ~37% of the mass in clumps and ~29% of the SFR. They are more massive and with older stellar ages than the in situ clumps, especially near the disc edge. Roughly half the galaxies at redshifts z=4-1 are clumpy over a wide range of stellar mass, with clumps accounting for ~3-30% of the SFR but ~0.1-3% of the stellar mass.
  • Although there has been much progress in understanding how galaxies evolve, we still do not understand how and when they stop forming stars and become quiescent. We address this by applying our galaxy spectral energy distribution models, which incorporate physically motivated star formation histories (SFHs) from cosmological simulations, to a sample of quiescent galaxies at $0.2<z<2.1$. A total of 845 quiescent galaxies with multi-band photometry spanning rest-frame ultraviolet through near-infrared wavelengths are selected from the CANDELS dataset. We compute median SFHs of these galaxies in bins of stellar mass and redshift. At all redshifts and stellar masses, the median SFHs rise, reach a peak, and then decline to reach quiescence. At high redshift, we find that the rise and decline are fast, as expected because the Universe is young. At low redshift, the duration of these phases depends strongly on stellar mass. Low-mass galaxies ($\log(M_{\ast}/M_{\odot})\sim9.5$) grow on average slowly, take a long time to reach their peak of star formation ($\gtrsim 4$ Gyr), and the declining phase is fast ($\lesssim 2$ Gyr). Conversely, high-mass galaxies ($\log(M_{\ast}/M_{\odot})\sim11$) grow on average fast ($\lesssim 2$ Gyr), and, after reaching their peak, decrease the star formation slowly ($\gtrsim 3$ Gyr). These findings are consistent with galaxy stellar mass being a driving factor in determining how evolved galaxies are, with high-mass galaxies being the most evolved at any time (i.e., downsizing). The different durations we observe in the declining phases also suggest that low- and high-mass galaxies experience different quenching mechanisms that operate on different timescales.