• ALPS II is a light shining through a wall style experiment that will use the principle of resonant enhancement to boost the conversion and reconversion probabilities of photons to relativistic WISPs. This will require the use of long baseline low-loss optical cavities. Very high power build up factors in the cavities must be achieved in order to reach the design sensitivity of ALPS II. This necessitates a number of different sophisticated optical and control systems to maintain the resonance and ensure maximal coupling between the laser and the cavity. In this paper we report on the results of the characterization of these optical systems with a 20 m cavity and discuss the results in the context of ALPS II.
  • Four decades after its prediction, the axion remains the most compelling solution to the Strong-CP problem and a well-motivated dark matter candidate, inspiring a host of elegant and ultrasensitive experiments based on axion-photon mixing. This report reviews the experimental situation on several fronts. The microwave cavity experiment is making excellent progress in the search for dark matter axions in the microelectronvolt range and may be plausibly extended up to 100 mu eV. Within the past several years however, it has been realized that axions are pervasive throughout string theories, but with masses that fall naturally in the nanoelectronvolt range, for which a NMR-based search is under development. Searches for axions emitted from the Sun's burning core, and purely laboratory experiments based on photon regeneration have both made great strides in recent years, with ambitious projects proposed for the coming decade. Each of these campaigns has pushed the state of the art in technology, enabling large gains in sensitivity and mass reach. Furthermore each modality has also been exploited to search for more generalized axion-like particles, that will also be discussed in this report. We are hopeful, even optimistic, that the next review of the subject will concern the discovery of the axion, its properties, and its exploitation as a probe of early universe cosmology and structure formation.
  • We give a brief update on the search for Hidden Photon Dark Matter with FUNK. The experiment uses a large spherical mirror, which, if Hidden Photon Dark Matter exists in the accessible mass and coupling parameter range, would yield an optical signal in the mirror's center in an otherwise dark environment. After a test run with a CCD, preparations for a run with a low-noise PMT are under way and described in this proceedings.
  • If dark matter consists of hidden-sector photons which kinetically mix with regular photons, a tiny oscillating electric-field component is present wherever we have dark matter. In the surface of conducting materials this induces a small probability to emit single photons almost perpendicular to the surface, with the corresponding photon frequency matching the mass of the hidden photons. We report on a construction of an experimental setup with a large ~14 m2 spherical metallic mirror that will allow for searches of hidden-photon dark matter in the eV and sub-eV range by application of different electromagnetic radiation detectors. We discuss sensitivity and accessible regions in the dark matter parameter space.
  • The ALPS II experiment, Any Light Particle Search II at DESY in Hamburg, will look for light (m< 10-4 eV) new fundamental bosons (e.g., axion-like particles, hidden photons and other WISPs) in the next years by the mean of a light-shining-through-the-wall setup. The ALPS II photosensor is a Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) optimized for lambda = 1064 nm photons. The detector is routinely operated at 80 mK, allowing single infrared photon detections as well as non-dispersive spectroscopy with very low background rates. The demonstrated quantum efficiency for such TES is up to 95% at lambda =1064 nm. For 1064 nm photons, the measured background rate is < 10-2 sec-1 and the intrinsic dark count rate in a dark environment was found to be of 1,0.10-4 sec-1. Latest characterization results are discussed.
  • The high efficiency, low-background, and single-photon detection with transition-edge sensors (TES) is making this type of detector attractive in widely different types of application. In this paper, we present first characterizations of a TES to be used in the Any Light Particle Search (ALPS) experiment searching for new fundamental ultra-light particles. Firstly, we describe the setup and the main components of the ALPS TES detector (TES, millikelvin-cryostat and SQUID read-out) and their performances. Secondly, we explain a dedicated analysis method for single-photon spectroscopy and rejection of non-photon background. Finally, we report on results from extensive background measurements. Considering an event-selection, optimized for a wavelength of $1064~{\rm nm}$, we achieved a background suppression of $\sim 10^{-3}$ with a $\sim 50~\%$ efficiency for photons passing the selection. The resulting overall efficiency was $23~\%$ with a dark count rate of $8.6 \cdot 10^{-3}~{\rm s}^{-1}$. We observed that pile-up events of thermal photons are the main background component.
  • We present the results of a search for transversely polarised hidden photons (HPs) with $\sim 3$ eV energies emitted from the Sun. These hypothetical particles, known also as paraphotons or dark sector photons, are theoretically well motivated for example by string theory inspired extensions of the Standard Model. Solar HPs of sub-eV mass can convert into photons of the same energy (photon$\leftrightarrow$HP oscillations are similar to neutrino flavour oscillations). At SHIPS this would take place inside a long light-tight high-vacuum tube, which tracks the Sun. The generated photons would then be focused into a low-noise photomultiplier at the far end of the tube. Our analysis of 330 h of data (and {330 h} of background characterisation) reveals no signal of photons from solar hidden photon conversion. We estimate the rate of newly generated photons due to this conversion to be smaller than 25 mHz/m$^2$ at the 95$%$ C.L. Using this and a recent model of solar HP emission, we set stringent constraints on $\chi$, the coupling constant between HPs and photons, as a function of the HP mass.
  • If Dark Matter is composed of hidden-sector photons that kinetically mix with photons of the visible sector, then Dark Matter has a tiny oscillating electric field component. Its presence would lead to a small amount of visible radiation being emitted from a conducting surface, with the photon frequency given approximately by the mass of the hidden photon. Here, we report on experimental efforts that have started recently to search for such hidden photon Dark Matter in the (sub-)eV regime with a prototype mirror for the Auger fluorescence detector at the Karlsruhe Institute for Technology.
  • An essential design requirement of the ALPS-II experiment is the efficient detection of single photons with a very low instrumental background of 10 {\mu}Hz. In 2011 the ALPS collaboration started to set up a TES detector (Transition-Edge Sensor) for ALPS-II, the second phase of the experiment. Since mid of 2013 the setup is ready for characterization in the ALPS laboratory: an ADR cryostat (Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator) as millikelvin environment, a low noise SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) with electronics for read-out and a fiber-coupled high-efficient TES for near-infrared photons as sensor. First measurements have shown a good discrimination between noise and 1064 nm signals.
  • Measurements in the radio regime embrace a number of effective approaches for WISP searches, often covering unique or highly complementary ranges of the parameter space compared to those explored in other research domains. These measurements can be used to search for electromagnetic tracers of the hidden photon and axion oscillations, extending down to ~10^-19 eV the range of the hidden photon mass probed, and closing the last gaps in the strongly favoured 1-5 micro-eV range for axion dark matter. This provides a strong impetus for several new initiatives in the field, including the WISP Dark Matter eXperiment (WISPDMX) and novel conceptual approaches for broad-band WISP searches in the 0.1-1000 micro-eV range.
  • This document constitutes an excerpt of the Technical Design Report for the second stage of the "Any Light Particle Search" (ALPS-II) at DESY as submitted to the DESY PRC in August 2012 and reviewed in November 2012. ALPS-II is a "Light Shining through a Wall" experiment which searches for photon oscillations into weakly interacting sub-eV particles. These are often predicted by extensions of the Standard Model and motivated by astrophysical phenomena. The first phases of the ALPS-II project were approved by the DESY management on February 21st, 2013.
  • The cold dark matter of the Universe may be comprised of very light and very weakly interacting particles, so-called WISPs. Two prominent examples are hidden photons and axion-like particles. In this note we propose a new technique to sensitively search for this type of dark matter with dish antennas. The technique is broadband and allows to explore a whole range of masses in a single measurement.
  • Dark energy models, such as the chameleon, where the acceleration of the expansion of the universe results from the dynamics of a scalar field coupled to matter, suffer from the potential existence of a fifth force. Three known mechanisms have been proposed to restore General Relativity in the solar system and the laboratory, which are the symmetron/Damour-Polyakov effect, the Vainshtein property and the chameleon screening. Here, we propose to probe the existence of chameleons in the laboratory, considering their particle physics consequences. We envisage the resonant and non-resonant production of chameleons in the sun and their back-conversion into X-ray photons in a solar helioscope pipe such as the one used by CAST. A detection of these X-rays would indicate the existence of chameleons. We focus on a template model for the solar magnetic field: a constant magnetic field in a narrow shell surrounding the tachocline. The X-ray photons in a helioscope pipe obtained from back-conversion of the chameleons created inside the sun have a spectrum which is peaked in the sub-keV region, just below the actual sensitivity range of the present axion helioscopes. Nevertheless they are detectable by present day magnetic helioscopes like CAST and Sumico, which were built originally for solar axions. We also propose a chameleon-through-a-wall experiment whereby X-ray photons from a synchroton radiation source could be converted into chameleons inside a dipole magnet, then pass a wall which is opaque to X-rays before being back-converted into X-ray photons in a second magnet downstream. We show that this could provide a direct signature for the existence of chameleon particles.
  • Chameleon particles, which could explain dark energy, are in many ways similar to axions, suggesting that an axion helioscope can be used for chameleon detection. The distinguishing property of chameleon particles is that, unlike Standard Model particles, their effective masses depend upon the ambient matter-energy density. The associated total internal reflection of chameleons up to keV energies by a dense layer of material, which would occur at grazing incidence on the mirrors of an X-ray telescope, lead to new experimental techniques for detecting such particles. We discuss here when this total internal reflection can happen and how it can be implemented in existing or future state-of-the-art chameleon telescopes. Solar Chameleons would be emitted mainly with energies below a few keV suggesting the X-ray telescope as the basic component in chameleon telescopy. The implementation of this idea is straightforward, but it deserves further scrutiny. It seems promising to prepare and run a dark energy particle candidate detection experiment combining existing equipment. For example, large volumes and strong solenoid magnetic fields, which are not appropriate for solar axion investigations, are attractive from the point of view of chameleon telescopy.
  • The Solar Hidden Photon Search (SHIPS) is a joint astroparticle project of the Hamburger Sternwarte and DESY. The main target is to detect the solar emission of a new species of particles, so called Hidden Photons (HPs). Due to kinetic mixing, photons and HPs can convert into each other as they propagate. A small number of solar HPs - originating from photon to HP oscillations in the interior of the Sun - can be converted into photons in a long vacuum pipe pointing to the Sun - the SHIPS helioscope.
  • In this work we consider searches for dark matter made of axions or axion-like particles (ALPs) using resonant radio frequency cavities inserted into dipole magnets from particle accelerators, wiggler magnets developed for accelerator based advanced light sources, and toroidal magnets similar to those used in particle physics detectors. We investigate the expected sensitivity of such ALP dark matter detectors and discuss the engineering aspects of building and tuning them. Brief mention is also made of even stronger field magnets that are becoming available due to improvements in magnetic technology. It is concluded that new experiments utilizing already existing magnets could greatly enlarge the mass region in searches for axion-like dark matter particles.
  • "Light-shining-through-a-wall" experiments search for Weakly Interacting Sub-eV Particles (WISPs). The necessity and status of such enterprises as well as their future potential are sketched.
  • Recently, the PVLAS collaboration has reported evidence for an anomalous rotation of the polarization of light in vacuum in the presence of a transverse magnetic field. This may be explained through the production of a new light spin-zero (axion-like) neutral particle coupled to two photons. In this letter-of-intent, we propose to test this hypothesis by setting up a photon regeneration experiment which exploits the photon beam of a high-power infrared laser, sent along the transverse magnetic field of a superconducting HERA dipole magnet. The proposed ALPS (Axion-Like Particle Search) experiment offers a window of opportunity for a rapid firm establishment or exclusion of the axion-like particle interpretation of the anomaly published by PVALS. It will also allow for the measurement of mass, parity, and coupling strength of this particle. [The experiment has been approved by the DESY directorate on January 11, 2007.]