• Context. The SAO 206462 (HD 135344B) disk is one of the few known transitional disks showing asymmetric features in scattered light and thermal emission. Near-infrared scattered-light images revealed two bright outer spiral arms and an inner cavity depleted in dust. Giant protoplanets have been proposed to account for the disk morphology. Aims. We aim to search for giant planets responsible for the disk features and, in the case of non-detection, to constrain recent planet predictions using the data detection limits. Methods. We obtained new high-contrast and high-resolution total intensity images of the target spanning the Y to the K bands (0.95-2.3 mic) using the VLT/SPHERE near-infrared camera and integral field spectrometer. Results. The spiral arms and the outer cavity edge are revealed at high resolutions and sensitivities without the need for image post-processing techniques, which introduce photometric biases. We do not detect any close-in companions. For the derivation of the detection limits on putative giant planets embedded in the disk, we show that the knowledge of the disk aspect ratio and viscosity is critical for the estimation of the attenuation of a planet signal by the protoplanetary dust because of the gaps that these putative planets may open. Given assumptions on these parameters, the mass limits can vary from ~2-5 to ~4-7 Jupiter masses at separations beyond the disk spiral arms. The SPHERE detection limits are more stringent than those derived from archival NaCo/L' data and provide new constraints on a few recent predictions of massive planets (4-15 MJ) based on the spiral density wave theory. The SPHERE and ALMA data do not favor the hypotheses on massive giant planets in the outer disk (beyond 0.6). There could still be low-mass planets in the outer disk and/or planets inside the cavity.
  • 51 Eridani b is an exoplanet around a young (20 Myr) nearby (29.4 pc) F0-type star, recently discovered by direct imaging. Being only 0.5" away from its host star it is well suited for spectroscopic analysis using integral field spectrographs. We aim to refine the atmospheric properties of this and to further constrain the architecture of the system by searching for additional companions. Using the SPHERE instrument at the VLT we extend the spectral coverage of the planet to the complete Y- to H-band range and provide photometry in the K12-bands (2.11, 2.25 micron). The object is compared to other cool and peculiar dwarfs. Furthermore, the posterior probability distributions of cloudy and clear atmospheric models are explored using MCMC. We verified our methods by determining atmospheric parameters for the two benchmark brown dwarfs Gl 570D and HD 3651B. For probing the innermost region for additional companions, archival VLT-NACO (L') SAM data is used. We present the first spectrophotometric measurements in the Y- and K-bands for the planet and revise its J-band flux to values 40% fainter than previous measurements. Cloudy models with uniform cloud coverage provide a good match to the data. We derive the temperature, radius, surface gravity, metallicity and cloud sedimentation parameter f_sed. We find that the atmosphere is highly super-solar (Fe/H~1.0) with an extended, thick cloud cover of small particles. The model radius and surface gravity suggest planetary masses of about 9 M_jup. The evolutionary model only provides a lower mass limit of >2 M_jup (for pure hot-start). The cold-start model cannot explain the planet's luminosity. The SPHERE and NACO/SAM detection limits probe the 51 Eri system at Solar System scales and exclude brown-dwarf companions more massive than 20 M_jup beyond separations of ~2.5 au and giant planets more massive than 2 M_jup beyond 9 au.
  • Context. Astrometric monitoring of directly-imaged exoplanets allows the study of their orbital parameters and system architectures. Because most directly-imaged planets have long orbital periods (>20 AU), accurate astrometry is challenging when based on data acquired on timescales of a few years and usually with different instruments. The LMIRCam camera on the LBT is being used for the LEECH survey to search for and characterize young and adolescent exoplanets in L' band, including their system architectures. Aims. We first aim to provide a good astrometric calibration of LMIRCam. Then, we derive new astrometry, test the predictions of the orbital model of 8:4:2:1 mean motion resonance proposed by Go\'zdziewski & Migaszewski, and perform new orbital fitting of the HR 8799 bcde planets. We also present deep limits on a putative fifth planet interior to the known planets. Methods. We use observations of HR 8799 and the Theta1 Ori C field obtained during the same run in October 2013. Results. We first characterize the distortion of LMIRCam. We determine a platescale and a true north orientation for the images of 10.707 +/- 0.012 mas/pix and -0.430 +/- 0.076 deg, respectively. The errors on the platescale and true north orientation translate into astrometric accuracies at a separation of 1 of 1.1 mas and 1.3 mas, respectively. The measurements for all planets are usually in agreement within 3 sigma with the ephemeris predicted by Go\'zdziewski & Migaszewski. The orbital fitting based on the new astrometric measurements favors an architecture for the planetary system based on 8:4:2:1 mean motion resonance. The detection limits allow us to exclude a fifth planet slightly brighter/more massive than HR 8799 b at the location of the 2:1 resonance with HR 8799 e (~9.5 AU) and about twice as bright as HR 8799 cde at the location of the 3:1 resonance with HR 8799 e (~7.5 AU).
  • Chandra observations toward the nearby molecular cloud MBM12 show unexpectedly strong and nearly equal foreground O VIII and O VII emission. As the observed portion of MBM12 is optically thick at these energies, the emission lines must be formed nearby, coming either from the Local Bubble (LB) or charge exchange with ions from the Sun. Equilibrium models for the LB predict stronger O VII than O VIII, so these results suggest that the LB is far from equilibrium or a substantial portion of O VIII is from another source, such as charge exchange within the Solar system. Despite the likely contamination, we can combine our results with other EUV and X-ray observations to reject LB models which posit a cool recombining plasma as the source of LB X-rays.