• The Nancay Decameter Array (NDA) routinely observes low frequency (10-100 MHz) radio emissions of Jupiter and the Sun since 4 decades. The NDA observations, acquired with a variety of receivers with increasing performances, were the basis for numerous studies of jovian and solar radio emissions and now form a unique long-term database spanning >3 solar cycles and jovian revolutions. In addition, the NDA historically brought a fruitful support to space-based radio observatories of the heliosphere, to multi-wavelength analyses of solar activity and contributes to the development of space weather services. After having summarized the NDA characteristics, this article presents latest instrumental and database developments, some recent scientific results and perspectives for the next decade.
  • The high latitude radio emissions produced by the Cyclotron Maser Instability (CMI) in Jupiter's magnetosphere extend from a few kHz to 40 MHz. Part of the decametric emissions is of auroral origin, and part is driven by the moons Io, Europa and Ganymede. After summarizing the method used to identify Jupiter-satellite radio emissions, which consists in comparing space- and ground-based radio observations to ExPRES simulations of CMI-driven emissions in the time-frequency plane, we present a parametric study of the free parameters required by the ExPRES code (electron distribution function and resonant energy, magnetic field model, lead angle, and altitude of the ionospheric cut-off) in order to assess the accuracy of our simulations in the Io-Jupiter case. We find that Io-DAM arcs are fairly modeled by loss-cone driven CMI with electrons of 1-10 keV energy, using the ISaAC, VIPAL or VIP4 magnetic field model and a simple sinusoidal lead angle model. The altitude of the ionospheric cut-off has a marginal impact on the simulations. We discuss the impact of our results on the identification of Europa-DAM and Ganymede-DAM emissions.
  • Analyzing a database of 26 years of observations of Jupiter from the Nan\c{c}ay Decameter Array, we study the occurrence of Io-independent emissions as a function of the orbital phase of the other Galilean satellites and Amalthea. We identify unambiguously the emissions induced by Ganymede and characterize their intervals of occurrence in CML and Ganymede phase and longitude. We also find hints of emissions induced by Europa and, surprisingly, by Amalthea. The signature of Callisto-induced emissions is more tenuous.
  • The VESPA data access system focuses on applying Virtual Observatory (VO) standards and tools to Planetary Science. Building on a previous EC-funded Europlanet program, it has reached maturity during the first year of a new Europlanet 2020 program (started in 2015 for 4 years). The infrastructure has been upgraded to handle many fields of Solar System studies, with a focus both on users and data providers. This paper describes the broad lines of the current VESPA infrastructure as seen by a potential user, and provides examples of real use cases in several thematic areas. These use cases are also intended to identify hints for future developments and adaptations of VO tools to Planetary Science.
  • Since 2003 the Planetary Virtual Observatory and Laboratory (PVOL) has been storing and serving publicly through its web site a large database of amateur observations of the Giant Planets (Hueso et al., 2010a). These images are used for scientific research of the atmospheric dynamics and cloud structure on these planets and constitute a powerful resource to address time changing phenomena in their atmospheres. Advances over the last decade in observation techniques, and a wider conscience by professional astronomers of the quality of amateur observations, have resulted in the necessity to upgrade this database. We here present major advances in the PVOL database that has evolved into a full virtual planetary observatory encompassing also observations of Mercury, Venus, Mars, the Moon and the Galilean satellites. Besides the new objects, the images can be tagged and the database allows simple and complex searches over the data. The new web service: PVOL2 is available online in http://pvol2.ehu.eus/ , contains a fully functional search engine and constitutes one of the many services included in VESPA (Virtual Europan Solar and Planetary Access). Data from PVOL2 can be served from the VESPA portal using the EPN-TAP protocol. PVOL2 also provides long-term storage to amateur observations containing about 30,000 amateur observations starting in the year 2000. Current and past observations from the amateur community provide a global view of the Solar System planets over the years with several possibilities for scientific analysis and amateur astronomers involvement in planetary science.
  • The Europlanet 2020 Research Infrastructure will include new Planetary Space Weather Services (PSWS) that will extend the concepts of space weather and space situational awareness to other planets in our Solar System and in particular to spacecraft that voyage through it. PSWS will make five entirely new toolkits accessible to the research community and to industrial partners planning for space missions: a general planetary space weather toolkit, as well as three toolkits dedicated to the following key planetary environments: Mars, comets, and outer planets. This will give the European planetary science community new methods, interfaces, functionalities and/or plugins dedicated to planetary space weather in the tools and models available within the partner institutes. It will also create a novel event-diary toolkit aiming at predicting and detecting planetary events like meteor showers and impacts. A variety of tools are available for tracing propagation of planetary and/or solar events through the Solar System and modelling the response of the planetary environment (surfaces, atmospheres, ionospheres, and magnetospheres) to those events. But these tools were not originally designed for planetary event prediction and space weather applications. PSWS will provide the additional research and tailoring required to apply them for these purposes. PSWS will be to review, test, improve and adapt methods and tools available within the partner institutes in order to make prototype planetary event and space weather services operational in Europe at the end of the programme. To achieve its objectives PSWS will use a few tools and standards developed for the Astronomy Virtual Observatory (VO). This paper gives an overview of the project together with a few illustrations of prototype services based on VO standards and protocols.
  • The STEREO/WAVES (SWAVES) experiment on board the two STEREO spacecraft (Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory) launched on 25 October 2006 is dedicated to the measurement of the radio spectrum at frequencies between a few kilohertz and 16 MHz. The SWAVES antenna system consists of 6 m long orthogonal monopoles designed to measure the electric component of the radio waves. With this configuration direction finding of radio sources and polarimetry (analysis of the polarization state) of incident radio waves is possible. For the evaluation of the SWAVES data the receiving properties of the antennas, distorted by the radiation coupling with the spacecraft body and other onboard devices, have to be known accurately. In the present context, these properties are described by the antenna effective length vectors. We present the results of an in-flight calibration of the SWAVES antennas using the observations of the nonthermal terrestrial auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) during STEREO roll maneuvers in an early stage of the mission. A least squares method combined with a genetic algorithm was applied to find the effective length vectors of the STEREO Behind (STEREO-B)/WAVES antennas in a quasi-static frequency range ($L_{antenna} \ll \lambda_{wave}$) which fit best to the model and observed AKR intensity profiles. The obtained results confirm the former SWAVES antenna analysis by rheometry and numerical simulations. A final set of antenna parameters is recommended as a basis for evaluations of the SWAVES data.
  • We have performed a statistical study of $152$ Type III radio bursts observed by Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO)/Waves between May 2007 and February 2013. We have investigated the flux density between $125$kHz and $16$MHz. Both high- and low-frequency cutoffs have been observed in $60\,%$ of events suggesting an important role of propagation. As already reported by previous authors, we observed that the maximum flux density occurs at $1$MHz on both spacecraft. We have developed a simplified analytical model of the flux density as a function of radial distance and compared it to the STEREO/Waves data.
  • A Data Access Protocol has been set up to search and retrieve Planetary Science data in general. This protocol will allow the user to select a subset of data from an archive in a standard way, based on the IVOA Table Access Protocol (TAP). The TAP mechanism is completed by an underlying Data Model and reference dictionaries. This paper describes the principle of the EPN- TAP protocol and interfaces, underlines the choices that have been made, and discusses possible evolutions.
  • In the framework of the Europlanet-RI program, a prototype of Virtual Observatory dedicated to Planetary Science was defined. Most of the activity was dedicated to the elaboration of standards to retrieve and visualize data in this field, and to provide light procedures to teams who wish to contribute with on-line data services. The architecture of this VO system and selected solutions are presented here, together with existing demonstrators.
  • On 17 October 2008, the Cassini spacecraft crossed the southern sources of Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR), while flying along high-latitude nightside magnetic field lines. In situ measurements allowed us to characterize for the first time the source region of an extra-terrestrial auroral radio emission. Using radio, magnetic field and particle observations, we show that SKR sources are surrounded by a hot tenuous plasma, in a region of upward field-aligned currents. Magnetic field lines supporting radio sources map a continuous, high-latitude and spiral-shaped auroral oval observed on the dawnside, consistent with enhanced auroral activity. Investigating the Cyclotron Maser Instability (CMI) as a mechanism responsible for SKR generation, we find that observed cutoff frequencies are consistent with radio waves amplified perpendicular to the magnetic field by hot (6 to 9 keV) resonant electrons, measured locally.
  • The Cassini mission crossed the source region of the Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR) on 17 October 2008. On this occasion, the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) experiment detected both local and distant radio sources, while plasma parameters were measured in situ by the magnetometer (MAG) and the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS). A goniopolarimetric inversion was applied to RPWS 3-antenna electric measurements to determine the wave vector k and the complete state of polarization of detected waves. We identify broadband extraordinary (X) as well as narrowband ordinary (O) mode SKR at low frequencies. Within the source region, SKR is emitted just above the X mode cutoff frequency in a hot plasma, with a typical electron-to-wave energy conversion efficiency of 1% (2% peak). The knowledge of the k-vector is then used to derive the locus of SKR sources in the kronian magnetosphere, that shows X and O components emanating from the same regions. We also compute the associated beaming angle at the source theta'=(k,-B) either from (i) in situ measurements or a model of the magnetic field vector or from (ii) polarization measurements. Obtained results, similar for both modes, suggest quasi-perpendicular emission for local sources, whereas the beaming pattern of distant sources appears as a hollow cone with a frequency-dependent constant aperture angle: theta'=75{\deg}+/-15{\deg} below 300kHz, decreasing at higher frequencies to reach theta'(1000kHz)=50{\deg}+/-25{\deg}. Finally, we investigate quantitatively the SKR polarization state, observed to be strongly elliptical at the source, and quasi-purely circular for sources located beyond approximately 2 kronian radii. We show that conditions of weak mode coupling are achieved along the ray path, under which the magneto-ionic theory satisfactorily describes the evolution of the observed polarization.