• Hubble Space Telescope (HST) fine guidance sensor observations were used to obtain parallaxes of eight metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -1.4) stars. The parallaxes of these stars determined by the revised Hipparcos reduction average 17% accuracy, in contrast to our new HST parallaxes which average 1% accuracy and have errors on the individual parallaxes ranging from 85 to 144 microarcsecond. This parallax data has been combined with HST ACS photometry in the F606W and F814W filters to obtain the absolute magnitudes of the stars with an accuracy of 0.02 to 0.03 magnitudes. Six of these stars are on the main sequence (with -2.7 < [Fe/H] < -1.8), and suitable for testing metal-poor stellar evolution models and determining the distances to metal-poor globular clusters. Using the abundances obtained by O'Malley et al. (2017) we find that standard stellar models using the Vandenberg & Clem (2003) color transformation do a reasonable job of matching five of the main sequence stars, with HD 54639 ([Fe/H] = -2.5) being anomalous in its location in the color-magnitude diagram. Stellar models and isochrones were generated using a Monte Carlo analysis to take into account uncertainties in the models. Isochrones which fit the parallax stars were used to determine the distances and ages of nine globular clusters (with -2.4 <= [Fe/H] <= -1.9$). Averaging together the age of all nine clusters, leads to an absolute age of the oldest, most metal-poor globular clusters of 12.7+/- 1.0 Gyr, where the quoted uncertainty takes into account the known uncertainties in the stellar models and isochrones, along with the uncertainty in the distance and reddening of the clusters.
  • Synthetic RGBB magnitudes are generated with the most recent theoretical stellar evolution models computed with the Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Program (DSEP) code. They are compared to the observational work of Nataf et al., who present RGBB magnitudes for 72 globular clusters. A DSEP model using a chemical composition with enhanced $\alpha$ capture [$\alpha$/Fe] $ =+0.4$ and an age of 13 Gyr shows agreement with observations over metallicities ranging from [Fe/H] = $0$ to [Fe/H] $\approx-1.5$, with discrepancy emerging at lower metallicities.
  • The fraction of binary stars is an important ingredient to interpret globular cluster dynamical evolution and their stellar population. We investigate the properties of main-sequence binaries measured in a uniform photometric sample of 59 Galactic globular clusters that were observed by HST WFC/ACS as a part of the Globular Cluster Treasury project. We measured the fraction of binaries and the distribution of mass-ratio as a function of radial location within the cluster, from the central core to beyond the half-mass radius. We studied the radial distribution of binary stars, and the distribution of stellar mass ratios. We investigated monovariate relations between the fraction of binaries and the main parameters of their host clusters. We found that in nearly all the clusters, the total fraction of binaries is significantly smaller than the fraction of binaries in the field, with a few exceptions only. Binary stars are significantly more centrally concentrated than single MS stars in most of the clusters studied in this paper. The distribution of the mass ratio is generally flat (for mass-ratio parameter q>0.5). We found a significant anti-correlation between the binary fraction in a cluster and its absolute luminosity (mass). Some, less significant correlation with the collisional parameter, the central stellar density, and the central velocity dispersion are present. There is no statistically significant relation between the binary fraction and other cluster parameters. We confirm the correlation between the binary fraction and the fraction of blue stragglers in the cluster.
  • We present a new analysis of the Jupiter+Saturn analog system, OGLE-2006-BLG-109Lb,c, which was the first double planet system discovered with the gravitational microlensing method. This is the only multi-planet system discovered by any method with measured masses for the star and both planets. In addition to the signatures of two planets, this event also exhibits a microlensing parallax signature and finite source effects that provide a direct measure of the masses of the star and planets, and the expected brightness of the host star is confirmed by Keck AO imaging, yielding masses of M_* = 0.51(+0.05-0.04) M_sun, M_b = 231+-19 M_earth, M_c = 86+-7 M_earth. The Saturn-analog planet in this system had a planetary light curve deviation that lasted for 11 days, and as a result, the effects of the orbital motion are visible in the microlensing light curve. We find that four of the six orbital parameters are tightly constrained and that a fifth parameter, the orbital acceleration, is weakly constrained. No orbital information is available for the Jupiter-analog planet, but its presence helps to constrain the orbital motion of the Saturn-analog planet. Assuming co-planar orbits, we find an orbital eccentricity of eccentricity = 0.15 (+0.17-0.10) and an orbital inclination of i = 64 (+4-7) deg. The 95% confidence level lower limit on the inclination of i > 49 deg. implies that this planetary system can be detected and studied via radial velocity measurements using a telescope of >30m aperture.
  • The first paper in this series explored the effects of altering the chemical mixture of the stellar population on an element by element basis on stellar evolutionary tracks and isochrones to the end of the red giant branch. This paper extends the discussion by incorporating the fully consistent synthetic stellar spectra with those isochrone models in predicting integrated colors, Lick indices, and synthetic spectra. Older populations display element ratio effects in their spectra at higher amplitude than younger populations. In addition, spectral effects in the photospheres of stars tend to dominate over effects from isochrone temperatures and lifetimes, but, further, the isochrone-based effects that are present tend to fall along the age-metallicity degeneracy vector, while the direct stellar spectral effects usually show considerable orthogonality.
  • Photometry with HST's ACS reveals that the subgiant branch (SGB) of the globular cluster NGC 1851 splits into two well-defined branches. If the split is due only to an age effect, the two SGBs would imply two star formation episodes separated by $\sim$ 1 Gyr. We discuss other anomalies in NGC 1851 which could be interpreted in terms of a double stellar population. Finally, we compare the case of NGC 1851 with the other two globulars known to host multiple stellar populations, and show that all three clusters differ in several important respects.
  • Integrated light from distant galaxies is often compared to stellar population models via the equivalent widths of spectral features--spectral indices--whose strengths rely on the abundances of one or more elements. Such comparisons hinge not only on the overall metal abundance but also on relative abundances. Studies have examined the influence of individual elements on synthetic spectra but little has been done to address similar issues in the stellar evolution models that underlie most stellar population models. Stellar evolution models will primarily be influenced by changes in opacities. In order to explore this issue in detail, twelve sets of stellar evolution tracks and isochrones have been created at constant heavy element mass fraction Z that self-consistently account for varying heavy element mixtures. These sets include scaled-solar, alpha-enhanced, and individual cases where the elements C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca, Ti, and Fe have been enhanced above their scaled-solar values. The variations that arise between scaled-solar and the other cases are examined with respect to the H-R diagram and main sequence lifetimes.
  • The ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters, an HST Treasury Project, will deliver high quality, homogeneous photometry of 65 globular clusters. This paper introduces a new collection of stellar evolution tracks and isochrones suitable for analyzing the ACS Survey data. Stellar evolution models were computed at [Fe/H]= -2.5, -2.0, -1.5, -1.0, -0.5, and 0; [alpha/Fe]= -0.2, 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8; and three initial He abundances for masses from 0.1 to 1.8 Msun and ages from 2 to 15 Gyr. Each isochrone spans a wide range in luminosity from Mv~14 up to the tip of the red giant branch. These are complemented by a set of He-burning tracks that extend from the zero age horizontal branch to the onset of thermal pulsations on the asymptotic giant branch. In addition, a set of computer programs are provided that make it possible to interpolate the isochrones in [Fe/H], generate luminosity functions from the isochrones, and create synthetic horizontal branch models. The tracks and isochrones have been converted to the observational plane with two different color-Teff transformations, one synthetic and one semi-empirical, in ground-based B, V, and I, and F606W and F814W for both ACS-WFC and WFPC2 systems. All models and programs presented in this paper are available from http://stellar.dartmouth.edu/~models/
  • The past two Decadal Surveys in Astronomy and Astrophysics recommended the completion of a space-based interferometry mission, known today as SIM PlanetQuest, for its unique ability to detect and characterize nearby rocky planets (Bahcall 1991, McKee & Taylor 2001), as well as contributions to a broad range of problems in astrophysics. Numerous committees of the National Research Council as well as NASA Roadmaps have similarly highlighted SIM as the one technology that offers detection and characterization of rocky planets around nearby stars and which is technically ready. To date, SIM remains the only program with the capability of detecting and confirming rocky planets in the habitable zones of nearby solar-type stars. Moreover, SIM measures masses and three-dimensional orbits of habitable planets around nearby stars (within 25 pc); these are the only stars for which follow-up by other techniques is feasible, such as space-based spectroscopy, ground-based interferometry, and of course TPF.
  • We present new BVI ground-based photometry and VI space-based photometry for the globular cluster M92 (NGC 6341) and examine luminosity functions in B, V, and I containing over 50,000 stars ranging from the tip of the red giant branch to several magnitudes below the main sequence turn off. Once corrected for completeness, the observed luminosity functions agree very well with theoretical models and do not show stellar excesses in any region of the luminosity function. Using reduced chi squared fitting, the new M92 luminosity function is shown to be an excellent match to the previously published luminosity function for M30. These points combine to establish that the "subgiant excess" found in previously published luminosity functions of Galactic globular clusters are due to deficiencies in the stellar models used at that time. Using up to date stellar models results in good agreement between observations and theory. Several statistical methods are presented to best determine the age of M92. These methods prove to be insensitive to the exact choice of metallicity within the published range. Using [Fe/H]=-2.17 to match recent studies we find an age of 14.2 plus or minus 1.2 Gyr for the cluster.
  • We present the first results of a large ACS Survey of Galactic globular clusters. This Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Treasury project is designed to obtain photometry with S/N > ~10 for main sequence stars with masses > ~0.2Msun in a sample of globulars using the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel. Here we focus on clusters without previous HST imaging data. These include NGC 5466, 6779, 5053, 6144, Palomar 2, E 3, Lynga 7, Palomar 1, and NGC 6366. Our CMDs extend reliably from the horizontal branch to as much as seven magnitudes fainter than the main sequence turnoff and represent the deepest CMDs published to-date for these clusters. Using fiducial sequences for three standard clusters (M92, NGC 6752, and 47 Tuc) with well-known metallicities and distances, we perform main sequence fitting on the target clusters in order to obtain estimates of their distances and reddenings. These comparisons along with fitting the cluster main sequences to theoretical isochrones yield ages for the target clusters. We find that the majority of the clusters have ages that are consistent with the standard clusters at their metallicities. The exceptions are E 3 which appears ~2 Gyr younger than 47 Tuc, and Pal 1, which could be as much as 8 Gyr younger than 47 Tuc.
  • We compare the metallicities of stars with radial velocity planets to the metallicity of a sample of field dwarfs. We confirm recent work indicating that the stars-with-planet sample as a whole is iron rich. However, the lowest mass stars tend to be iron poor, with several having [Fe/H]<-0.2, demonstrating that high metallicity is not required for the formation of short period Jupiter-mass planets. We show that the average [Fe/H] increases with increasing stellar mass (for masses below 1.25 solar masses) in both samples, but that the increase is much more rapid in the stars-with-planet sample. The variation of metallicity with stellar age also differs between the two samples. We examine possible selection effects related to variations in the sensitivity of radial velocity surveys with stellar mass and metallicity, and identify a color cutoff (B-V>0.48) that contributes to but does not explain the mass-metallicity trend in the stars-with-planets sample. We use Monte Carlo models to show that adding an average of 6.5 Earth masses of iron to each star can explain both the mass-metallicity and the age-metallicity relations of the stars-with-planets sample. However, for at least one star, HD 38529, there is good evidence that the bulk metallicity is high. We conclude that the observed metallicities and metallicity trends are the result of the interaction of three effects; accretion of about 6 Earth masses of iron rich material, selection effects, and in some cases, high intrinsic metallicity.