• Recent analysis of strongly-lensed sources in the Hubble Frontier Fields indicates that the rest-frame UV luminosity function of galaxies at $z=$6--8 rises as a power law down to $M_\mathrm{UV}=-15$, and possibly as faint as -12.5. We use predictions from a cosmological radiation hydrodynamic simulation to map these luminosities onto physical space, constraining the minimum dark matter halo mass and stellar mass that the Frontier Fields probe. While previously-published theoretical studies have suggested or assumed that early star formation was suppressed in halos less massive than $10^9$--$10^{11} M_\odot$, we find that recent observations demand vigorous star formation in halos at least as massive as (3.1, 5.6, 10.5)$\times10^9 M_\odot$ at $z=(6,7,8)$. Likewise, we find that Frontier Fields observations probe down to stellar masses of (8.1, 18, 32)$\times10^6 M_\odot$; that is, they are observing the likely progenitors of analogues to Local Group dwarfs such as Pegasus and M32. Our simulations yield somewhat different constraints than two complementary models that have been invoked in similar analyses, emphasizing the need for further observational constraints on the galaxy-halo connection.
  • The sources that drove cosmological reionization left clues regarding their identity in the slope and inhomogeneity of the ultraviolet ionizing background (UVB): Bright quasars (QSOs) generate a hard UVB with predominantly large-scale fluctuations while Population II stars generate a softer one with smaller-scale fluctuations. Metal absorbers probe the UVB's slope because different ions are sensitive to different energies. Likewise, they probe spatial fluctuations because they originate in regions where a galaxy-driven UVB is harder and more intense. We take a first step towards studying the reionization-epoch UVB's slope and inhomogeneity by comparing observations of 12 metal absorbers at $z\sim6$ versus predictions from a cosmological hydrodynamic simulation using three different UVBs: a soft, spatially-inhomogeneous "galaxies+QSOs" UVB; a homogeneous "galaxies+QSOs" UVB (Haardt & Madau 2012); and a QSOs-only model. All UVBs reproduce the observed column density distributions of CII, SiIV, and CIV reasonably well although high-column, high-ionization absorbers are underproduced, reflecting numerical limitations. With upper limits treated as detections, only a soft, fluctuating UVB reproduces both the observed SiIV/CIV and CII/CIV distributions. The QSOs-only UVB overpredicts both CIV/CII and CIV/SiIV, indicating that it is too hard. The Haardt & Madau (2012) UVB underpredicts CIV/SiIV, suggesting that it lacks amplifications near galaxies. Hence current observations prefer a soft, fluctuating UVB as expected from a predominantly Population II background although they cannot rule out a harder one. Future observations probing a factor of two deeper in metal column density will distinguish between the soft, fluctuating and QSOs-only UVBs.
  • Observations suggest that CII was more abundant than CIV in the intergalactic medium towards the end of the hydrogen reionization epoch. This transition provides a unique opportunity to study the enrichment history of intergalactic gas and the growth of the ionizing background (UVB) at early times. We study how carbon absorption evolves from z=10-5 using a cosmological hydrodynamic simulation that includes a self-consistent multifrequency UVB as well as a well-constrained model for galactic outflows to disperse metals. Our predicted UVB is within 2-4 times that of Haardt & Madau (2012), which is fair agreement given the uncertainties. Nonetheless, we use a calibration in post-processing to account for Lyman-alpha forest measurements while preserving the predicted spectral slope and inhomogeneity. The UVB fluctuates spatially in such a way that it always exceeds the volume average in regions where metals are found. This implies both that a spatially-uniform UVB is a poor approximation and that metal absorption is not sensitive to the epoch when HII regions overlap globally even at column densites of 10^{12} cm^{-2}. We find, consistent with observations, that the CII mass fraction drops to low redshift while CIV rises owing the combined effects of a growing UVB and continued addition of carbon in low-density regions. This is mimicked in absorption statistics, which broadly agree with observations at z=6-3 while predicting that the absorber column density distributions rise steeply to the lowest observable columns. Our model reproduces the large observed scatter in the number of low-ionization absorbers per sightline, implying that the scatter does not indicate a partially-neutral Universe at z=6.
  • We use a radiation hydrodynamic simulation of the hydrogen reionization epoch to study OI absorbers at z~6. The intergalactic medium (IGM) is reionized before it is enriched, hence OI absorption originates within dark matter halos. The predicted abundance of OI absorbers is in reasonable agreement with observations. At z=10, roughly 70% of sightlines through atomically-cooled halos encounter a visible (N_OI > 10^14 cm^-2) column. Reionization ionizes and removes gas from halos less massive than 10^8.4 M_0, but 20% of sightlines through more massive halos encounter visible columns even at z=5. The mass scale of absorber host halos is 10-100 times smaller than the halos of Lyman break galaxies and Lyman-alpha emitters, hence absorption probes the dominant ionizing sources more directly. OI absorbers have neutral hydrogen columns of 10^19-10^21 cm^-2, suggesting a close resemblance between objects selected in OI and HI absorption. Finally, the absorption in the foreground of the z=7.085 quasar ULASJ1120+0641 cannot originate in a dark matter halo because halo gas at the observed HI column density is enriched enough to violate the upper limits on the OI column. By contrast, gas at less than one third the cosmic mean density satisfies the constraints. Hence the foreground absorption likely originates in the IGM.
  • We study the topology of reionization using accurate three-dimensional radiative transfer calculations post-processed on outputs from cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. In our simulations, reionization begins in overdense regions and then "leaks" directly into voids, with filaments reionizing last owing to their combination of high recombination rate and low emissivity. This result depends on the uniquely-biased emissivity field predicted by our prescriptions for star formation and feedback, which have previously been shown to account for a wide array of measurements of the post-reionization Universe. It is qualitatively robust to our choice of simulation volume, ionizing escape fraction, and spatial resolution (in fact it grows stronger at higher spatial resolution) even though the exact overlap redshift is sensitive to each of these. However, it weakens slightly as the escape fraction is increased owing to the reduced density contrast at higher redshift. We also explore whether our results are sensitive to commonly-employed approximations such as using optically-thin Eddington tensors or substantially altering the speed of light. Such approximations do not qualitatively change the topology of reionization. However, they can systematically shift the overlap redshift by up to $\Delta z\sim 0.5$, indicating that accurate radiative transfer is essential for computing reionization. Our model cannot simultaneously reproduce the observed optical depth to Thomson scattering and ionization rate per hydrogen atom at $z=6$, which could owe to numerical effects and/or missing early sources of ionization.