• Quantum degenerate gases trapped in optical lattices are ideal testbeds for fundamental physics because these systems are tunable, well characterized, and isolated from the environment. Controlled disorder can be introduced to explore suppression of quantum diffusion in the absence of conventional dephasing mechanisms such as phonons, which are unavoidable in experiments on electronic solids. Recent experiments use transport of degenerate Fermi gases in optical lattices (Kondov et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 083002 (2015)) to probe a particularly extreme regime of strong interaction in what can be modeled as an Anderson-Hubbard model. These experiments find evidence for an intriguing insulating phase where quantum diffusion is completely suppressed by strong disorder. Quantitative interpretation of these experiments remains an open problem that requires inclusion of non-zero entropy, strong interaction, and trapping. We argue that the suppression of transport can be thought of as localization of Hubbard-band quasiparticles. We construct a theory of transport of Hubbard-band quasiparticles tailored to trapped optical lattice experiments. We compare the theory directly with center-of-mass transport experiments of Kondov et al. with no fitting parameters. The close agreement between theory and experiments shows that the suppression of transport is only partly due to finite entropy effects. We argue that the complete suppression of transport is consistent with Anderson localization of Hubbard-band quasiparticles. The combination of our theoretical framework and optical lattice experiments offers an important platform for studying localization in isolated many-body quantum systems.
  • We probe the transition between superfluid and Bose glass phases using quantum quenches of disorder in an ultracold atomic lattice gas that realizes the disordered Bose-Hubbard model. Measurements of excitations generated by the quench exhibit threshold behavior in the disorder strength indicative of a phase transition. Ab-initio quantum Monte Carlo simulations confirm that the appearance of excitations coincides with the equilibrium superfluid--Bose-glass phase boundary at different lattice potential depths. By varying the quench time, we demonstrate the disappearance of an adiabatic timescale compared with microscopic parameters in the BG regime.
  • We observe the emergence of a disorder-induced insulating state in a strongly interacting atomic Fermi gas trapped in an optical lattice. This closed quantum system free of a thermal reservoir realizes the disordered Fermi-Hubbard model, which is a minimal model for strongly correlated electronic solids. In measurements of disorder-induced localization obtained via mass transport, we detect interaction-driven delocalization and localization that persists as the temperature of the gas is raised. These behaviors are consistent with many-body localization, which is a novel paradigm for understanding localization in interacting quantum systems at non-zero temperature.
  • AX J1745.6-2901 is a high-inclination (eclipsing) neutron star Low Mass X-ray Binary (LMXB) located less than ~1.5 arcmin from Sgr A*. Ongoing monitoring campaigns have targeted Sgr A* frequently and these observations also cover AX J1745.6-2901. We present here an X-ray analysis of AX J1745.6-2901 using a large dataset of 38 XMM-Newton observations, including eleven which caught AX J1745.6-2901 in outburst. Fe K absorption is clearly seen when AX J1745.6-2901 is in the soft state, but disappears during the hard state. The variability of these absorption features does not appear to be due to changes in the ionizing continuum. The small Kalpha/Kbeta ratio of the equivalent widths of the Fe xxv and Fe xxvi lines suggests that the column densities and turbulent velocities of the absorbing ionised plasma are in excess of N_H ~ 10^23 cm^-2 and v_turb >~ 500 km s^-1. These findings strongly support a connection between the wind (Fe K absorber) and the accretion state of the binary. These results reveal strong similarities between AX J1745.6-2901 and the eclipsing neutron star LMXB, EXO 0748-676, as well as with high-inclination black hole binaries, where winds (traced by the same Fe K absorption features) are observed only during the accretion-disc-dominated soft states, and disappear during the hard states characterised by jet emission.
  • Dissipation is introduced to a strongly interacting ultracold bosonic gas in the Mott-insulator regime of a 3D spin-dependent optical lattice. A weakly interacting superfluid comprised of atoms in a state that does not experience the lattice potential acts as a dissipative bath coupled to the lattice atoms via collisions. Lattice atoms are excited to higher-energy bands via Bragg transitions, and the resulting bath-induced decay is measured using the atomic quasimomentum distribution. A competing but slower intrinsic decay mechanism arising from collisions between lattice atoms is also investigated. The measured bath-induced decay rate is compared with the predictions of a weakly interacting model with no free parameters. The presence of intrinsic decay, which cannot be accommodated within this framework, signals that strong interactions may play a central role in the lattice-atom dynamics.
  • We report on the impact of variable-scale disorder on 3D Anderson localization of a non-interacting ultracold atomic gas. A spin-polarized gas of fermionic atoms is localized by allowing it to expand in an optical speckle potential. Using a sudden quench of the localized density distribution, we verify that the density profile is representative of the underlying single-particle localized states. The geometric mean of the disordering potential correlation lengths is varied by a factor of four via adjusting the aperture of the speckle focusing lens. We observe that the root-mean-square size of the localized gas increases approximately linearly with the speckle correlation length, in qualitative agreement with the scaling predicted by weak scattering theory.
  • Anderson localization (AL) is a ubiquitous interference phenomenon in which waves fail to propagate in a disordered medium. We observe three-dimensional AL of noninteracting ultracold matter by allowing a spin-polarized atomic Fermi gas to expand into a disordered potential. A two-component density distribution emerges consisting of an expanding mobile component and a nondiffusing localized component. We extract a mobility edge that increases with the disorder strength, whereas the thermally averaged localization length is shown to decrease with disorder strength and increase with particle energy. These measurements provide a benchmark for more sophisticated theories of AL.
  • We study quenches across the Bose-Hubbard Mott-insulator-to-superfluid quantum phase transition using an ultra-cold atomic gas trapped in an optical lattice. Quenching from the Mott insulator to superfluid phase is accomplished by continuously tuning the ratio of Hubbard tunneling to interaction energy. Excitations of the condensate formed after the quench are measured using time-of-flight imaging. We observe that the degree of excitation is proportional to the fraction of atoms that cross the phase boundary, and that the quantity of excitations and energy produced during the quench have a power-law dependence on the quench rate. These phenomena suggest an excitation process analogous to the Kibble-Zurek (KZ) mechanism for defect generation in non-equilibrium classical phase transitions.
  • Optical lattices have emerged as ideal simulators for Hubbard models of strongly correlated materials, such as the high-temperature superconducting cuprates. In optical lattice experiments, microscopic parameters such as the interaction strength between particles are well known and easily tunable. Unfortunately, this benefit of using optical lattices to study Hubbard models come with one clear disadvantage: the energy scales in atomic systems are typically nanoKelvin compared with Kelvin in solids, with a correspondingly miniscule temperature scale required to observe exotic phases such as d-wave superconductivity. The ultra-low temperatures necessary to reach the regime in which optical lattice simulation can have an impact-the domain in which our theoretical understanding fails-have been a barrier to progress in this field. To move forward, a concerted effort to develop new techniques for cooling and, by extension, techniques to measure even lower temperatures. This article will be devoted to discussing the concepts of cooling and thermometry, fundamental sources of heat in optical lattice experiments, and a review of proposed and implemented thermometry and cooling techniques.
  • We propose a method for measuring the temperature of strongly correlated phases of ultracold atom gases confined in spin-dependent optical lattices. In this technique, a small number of "impurity" atoms--trapped in a state that does not experience the lattice potential--are in thermal contact with atoms bound to the lattice. The impurity serves as a thermometer for the system because its temperature can be straightforwardly measured using time-of-flight expansion velocity. This technique may be useful for resolving many open questions regarding thermalization in these isolated systems. We discuss the theory behind this method and demonstrate proof-of-principle experiments, including the first realization of a 3D spin-dependent lattice in the strongly correlated regime.
  • Disorder can profoundly affect the transport properties of a wide range of quantum materials. Presently, there is significant disagreement regarding the effect of disorder on transport in the disordered Bose-Hubbard (DBH) model, which is the paradigm used to theoretically study disorder in strongly correlated bosonic systems. We experimentally realize the DBH model by using optical speckle to introduce precisely known, controllable, and fine-grained disorder to an optical lattice5. Here, by measuring the dissipation strength for transport, we discover a disorder-induced SF-to-insulator (IN) transition in this system, but we find no evidence for an IN-to-SF transition. Emergence of the IN at disorder strengths several hundred times the tunnelling energy agrees with a predicted SF--Bose glass (BG) transition from recent quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) work. Both the SF--IN transition and correlated changes in the atomic quasimomentum distribution--which verify a simple model for the interplay of disorder and interactions in this system--are phenomena new to the unit filling regime explored in this work, compared with the high filling limit probed previously. We find that increasing disorder strength generically leads to greater dissipation in the regime of mixed SF and Mott-insulator (MI) phases, excluding predictions of a disorder-induced, or "re-entrant," SF (RSF). While the absence of an RSF may be explained by the effect of finite temperature, we strongly constrain theories by measuring bounds on the entropy per particle in the disordered lattice.
  • We measure the temperature of ultra-cold Rb-87 gases transferred into an optical lattice and compare to non-interacting thermodynamics for a combined lattice--parabolic potential. Absolute temperature is determined at low temperature by fitting quasimomentum distributions obtained using bandmapping, i.e., turning off the lattice potential slowly compared with the bandgap. We show that distributions obtained at high temperature employing this technique are not quasimomentum distributions through numerical simulations. To overcome this limitation, we extract temperature using the in-trap size of the gas.
  • Disorder, prevalent in nature, is intimately involved in such spectacular effects as the fractional quantum Hall effect and vortex pinning in type-II superconductors. Understanding the role of disorder is therefore of fundamental interest to materials research and condensed matter physics. Universal behavior, such as Anderson localization, in disordered non-interacting systems is well understood. But, the effects of disorder combined with strong interactions remains an outstanding challenge to theory. Here, we experimentally probe a paradigm for disordered, strongly-correlated bosonic systems-the disordered Bose-Hubbard (DBH) model-using a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of ultra-cold atoms trapped in a completely characterized disordered optical lattice. We determine that disorder suppresses condensate fraction for superfluid (SF) or coexisting SF and Mott insulator (MI) phases by independently varying the disorder strength and the ratio of tunneling to interaction energy. In the future, these results can constrain theories of the DBH model and be extended to study disorder for strongly-correlated fermionic particles.
  • Phase slips play a primary role in dissipation across a wide spectrum of bosonic systems, from determining the critical velocity of superfluid helium to generating resistance in thin superconducting wires. This subject has also inspired much technological interest, largely motivated by applications involving nanoscale superconducting circuit elements, e.g., standards based on quantum phase-slip junctions. While phase slips caused by thermal fluctuations at high temperatures are well understood, controversy remains over the role of phase slips in small-scale superconductors. In solids, problems such as uncontrolled noise sources and disorder complicate the study and application of phase slips. Here we show that phase slips can lead to dissipation for a clean and well-characterized Bose-Hubbard (BH) system by experimentally studying transport using ultra-cold atoms trapped in an optical lattice. In contrast to previous work, we explore a low velocity regime described by the 3D BH model which is not affected by instabilities, and we measure the effect of temperature on the dissipation strength. We show that the damping rate of atomic motion-the analogue of electrical resistance in a solid-in the confining parabolic potential fits well to a model that includes finite damping at zero temperature. The low-temperature behaviour is consistent with the theory of quantum tunnelling of phase slips, while at higher temperatures a cross-over consistent with the transition to thermal activation of phase slips is evident. Motion-induced features reminiscent of vortices and vortex rings associated with phase slips are also observed in time-of-flight imaging.
  • We report the realization of a new iterative Fourier-transform algorithm for creating holograms that can diffract light into an arbitrary two-dimensional intensity profile. We show that the predicted intensity distributions are smooth with a fractional error from the target distribution at the percent level. We demonstrate that this new algorithm outperforms the most frequently used alternatives typically by one and two orders of magnitude in accuracy and roughness, respectively. The techniques described in this paper outline a path to creating arbitrary holographic atom traps in which the only remaining hurdle is physical implementation.
  • Bose-Einstein condensates of $^{87}$Rb atoms are transferred into radio-frequency (RF) induced adiabatic potentials and the properties of the corresponding dressed states are explored. We report on measurements of the spin composition of dressed condensates. We also show that adiabatic potentials can be used to trap atom gases in novel geometries, including suspending a cigar-shaped cloud above a curved sheet of atoms.
  • We briefly discuss recent experiments on quantum information processing using trapped ions at NIST. A central theme of this work has been to increase our capabilities in terms of quantum computing protocols, but we have also applied the same concepts to improved metrology, particularly in the area of frequency standards and atomic clocks. Such work may eventually shed light on more fundamental issues, such as the quantum measurement problem.
  • We demonstrate experimentally a robust quantum memory using a magnetic-field-independent hyperfine transition in 9Be+ atomic ion qubits at a magnetic field B ~= 0.01194 T. We observe that the single physical qubit memory coherence time is greater than 10 seconds, an improvement of approximately five orders of magnitude from previous experiments with 9Be+. We also observe long coherence times of decoherence-free subspace logical qubits comprising two entangled physical qubits and discuss the merits of each type of qubit.
  • We consider the feasibility of creating a phase of neutral bosonic atoms in which multiple Mott-insulating states coexist in a shell structure and propose an experiment to spatially resolve such a structure. This spatially-inhomogeneous phase of bosons, arising from the interplay between the confining potential and the short-ranged repulsion, has been previously predicted. While the Mott-insulator phase has been observed in an atomic gas, the spatial structure of this phase in the presence of an inhomogeneous potential has not yet been directly probed. In this paper, we give a simple recipe for creating a structure with any desired number of shells, and explore the stability of the structure under typical experimental conditions. The stability analysis gives some constraints on how successfully these states can be employed for quantum information experiments. The experimental probe we propose for observing this phase exploits transitions between two species of bosons, induced by applying a frequency-swept, oscillatory magnetic field. We present the expected experimental signatures of this probe, and show that they reflect the underlying Mott configuration for large lattice potential depth.
  • We demonstrate the cooling of a two species ion crystal consisting of one $^9Be^+$ and one $^{24}Mg^+$ ion. Since the respective cooling transitions of these two species are separated by more than 30 nm, laser manipulation of one ion has negligible effect on the other even when the ions are not individually addressed. As such this is a useful system for re-initializing the motional state in an ion trap quantum computer without affecting the qubit information. Additionally, we have found that the mass difference between ions enables a novel method for detecting and subsequently eliminating the effects of radio frequency (RF) micro-motion.
  • Experiments directed towards the development of a quantum computer based on trapped atomic ions are described briefly. We discuss the implementation of single qubit operations and gates between qubits. A geometric phase gate between two ion qubits is described. Limitations of the trapped-ion method such as those caused by Stark shifts and spontaneous emission are addressed. Finally, we describe a strategy to realize a large-scale device.
  • We show how an experimentally realized set of operations on a single trapped ion is sufficient to simulate a wide class of Hamiltonians of a spin-1/2 particle in an external potential. This system is also able to simulate other physical dynamics. As a demonstration, we simulate the action of an $n$-th order nonlinear optical beamsplitter. Two of these beamsplitters can be used to construct an interferometer sensitive to phase shifts in one of the interferometer beam paths. The sensitivity in determining these phase shifts increases linearly with $n$, and the simulation demonstrates that the use of nonlinear beamsplitters ($n$=2,3) enhances this sensitivity compared to the standard quantum limit imposed by a linear beamsplitter ($n$=1).
  • We report the experimental demonstration of a controlled-NOT (CNOT) quantum logic gate between motional and internal state qubits of a single ion where, as opposed to previously demonstrated gates, the conditional dynamics depends on the extent of the ion's wave-packet. Advantages of this CNOT gate over one demonstrated previously are its immunity from Stark shifts due to off-resonant couplings and the fact that an auxiliary internal level is not required. We characterize the gate logic through measurements of the post-gate ion state populations for both logic basis and superposition input states, and we demonstrate the gate coherence via an interferometric measurement.
  • Using a single, harmonically trapped $^9$Be$^+$ ion, we experimentally demonstrate a technique for generation of arbitrary states of a two-level particle confined by a harmonic potential. Rather than engineering a single Hamiltonian that evolves the system to a desired final sate, we implement a technique that applies a sequence of simple operations to synthesize the state.
  • We have investigated ion dynamics associated with a dual linear ion trap where ions can be stored in and moved between two distinct locations. Such a trap is a building block for a system to engineer arbitrary quantum states of ion ensembles. Specifically, this trap is the unit cell in a strategy for scalable quantum computing using a series of interconnected ion traps. We have transferred an ion between trap locations 1.2 mm apart in 50 $\mu$s with near unit efficiency ($> 10^{6}$ consecutive transfers) and negligible motional heating, while maintaining internal-state coherence. In addition, we have separated two ions held in a common trap into two distinct traps.