• Dynamic and thermal processes regulate the structure of the multi-phase interstellar medium (ISM), and ultimately establish how galaxies evolve through star formation. Thus, to constrain ISM models and better understand the interplay of these processes, it is of great interest to measure the thermal pressure ($P_{\rm th}$) of the diffuse, neutral gas. By combining [C II] 158 $\mu$m, HI, and CO data from 31 galaxies selected from the Herschel KINGFISH sample, we have measured thermal pressures in 534 predominantly atomic regions with typical sizes of $\sim$1 kiloparsec. We find a distribution of thermal pressures in the $P_{\rm th}/k\sim10^3-10^5$ K cm$^{-3}$ range. For a sub-sample of regions with conditions similar to those of the diffuse, neutral gas in the Galactic plane, we find thermal pressures that follow a log-normal distribution with a median value of $P_{\rm th}/k\approx3600$ K cm$^{-3}$. These results are consistent with thermal pressure measurements using other observational methods. We find that $P_{\rm th}$ increases with radiation field strength and star formation activity, as expected from the close link between the heating of the gas and the star formation rate. Our thermal pressure measurements fall in the regime where a two-phase ISM with cold and warm neutral medium could exist in pressure equilibrium. Finally, we find that the midplane thermal pressure of the diffuse gas is about $\sim30$% of the vertical weight of the overlying ISM, consistent with results from hydrodynamical simulations of self-regulated star formation in galactic disks.
  • The [NII] 122 and 205 \mu m transitions are powerful tracers of the ionized gas in the interstellar medium. By combining data from 21 galaxies selected from the Herschel KINGFISH and Beyond the Peak surveys, we have compiled 141 spatially resolved regions with a typical size of ~1 kiloparsec, with observations of both [NII] far-infrared lines. We measure [NII] 122/205 line ratios in the ~0.6-6 range, which corresponds to electron gas densities $n_e$~1-300 cm$^{-3}$, with a median value of $n_e$=30 cm$^{-3}$. Variations in the electron density within individual galaxies can be as a high as a factor of ~50, frequently with strong radial gradients. We find that $n_e$ increases as a function of infrared color, dust-weighted mean starlight intensity, and star formation rate surface density ($\Sigma_{SFR}$). As the intensity of the [NII] transitions is related to the ionizing photon flux, we investigate their reliability as tracers of the star formation rate (SFR). We derive relations between the [NII] emission and SFR in the low-density limit and in the case of a log-normal distribution of densities. The scatter in the correlation between [NII] surface brightness and $\Sigma_{SFR}$ can be understood as a property of the $n_e$ distribution. For regions with $n_e$ close to or higher than the [NII] line critical densities, the low-density limit [NII]-based SFR calibration systematically underestimates the SFR since [NII] emission is collisionally quenched. Finally, we investigate the relation between [NII] emission, SFR, and $n_e$ by comparing our observations to predictions from the MAPPINGS-III code.
  • To compute the SFR of galaxies from the rest-frame UV it is essential to take into account the obscuration by dust. To do so, one of the most popular methods consists in combining the UV with the emission from the dust itself in the IR. Yet, different studies have derived different estimators, showing that no such hybrid estimator is truly universal. In this paper we aim at understanding and quantifying what physical processes drive the variations between different hybrid estimators. Doing so, we aim at deriving new universal UV+IR hybrid estimators to correct the UV for dust attenuation, taking into account the intrinsic physical properties of galaxies. We use the CIGALE code to model the spatially-resolved FUV to FIR SED of eight nearby star-forming galaxies drawn from the KINGFISH sample. This allows us to determine their local physical properties, and in particular their UV attenuation, average SFR, average specific SFR (sSFR), and their stellar mass. We then examine how hybrid estimators depend on said properties. We find that hybrid UV+IR estimators strongly depend on the stellar mass surface density (in particular at 70 and 100 micron) and on the sSFR (in particular at 24 micron and the TIR). Consequently, the IR scaling coefficients for UV obscuration can vary by almost an order of magnitude. This result contrasts with other groups who found relatively constant coefficients with small deviations. We exploit these variations to construct a new class of hybrid estimators based on observed UV to near-IR colours and near-IR luminosity densities per unit area. We find that they can reliably be extended to entire galaxies. The new estimators provide better estimates of attenuation-corrected UV emission than classical hybrid estimators. Naturally taking into account the variable impact of dust heated by old stellar populations, they constitute a step towards universal estimators.
  • We have mapped the superwind/halo region of the nearby starburst galaxy M82 in the mid-infrared with $Spitzer-IRS$. The spectral regions covered include the H$_2 S(1)-S(3)$, [NeII], [NeIII] emission lines and PAH features. We estimate the total warm H$_2$ mass and the kinetic energy of the outflowing warm molecular gas to be between $M_{warm}\sim5-17\times10^6$ M$_{\odot}$ and $E_{K}\sim6-20\times10^{53}$ erg. Using the ratios of the 6.2, 7.7 and 11.3 micron PAH features in the IRS spectra, we are able to estimate the average size and ionization state of the small grains in the superwind. There are large variations in the PAH flux ratios throughout the outflow. The 11.3/7.7 and the 6.2/7.7 PAH ratios both vary by more than a factor of five across the wind region. The Northern part of the wind has a significant population of PAH's with smaller 6.2/7.7 ratios than either the starburst disk or the Southern wind, indicating that on average, PAH emitters are larger and more ionized. The warm molecular gas to PAH flux ratios (H$_2/PAH$) are enhanced in the outflow by factors of 10-100 as compared to the starburst disk. This enhancement in the H$_2/PAH$ ratio does not seem to follow the ionization of the atomic gas (as measured with the [NeIII]/[NeII] line flux ratio) in the outflow. This suggests that much of the warm H$_2$ in the outflow is excited by shocks. The observed H$_2$ line intensities can be reproduced with low velocity shocks ($v < 40$ km s$^{-1}$) driven into moderately dense molecular gas ($10^2 <n_H < 10^4$ cm$^{-3}$) entrained in the outflow.
  • The [CII] 157.74 $\mu$m transition is the dominant coolant of the neutral interstellar gas, and has great potential as a star formation rate (SFR) tracer. Using the Herschel KINGFISH sample of 46 nearby galaxies, we investigate the relation of [CII] surface brightness and luminosity with SFR. We conclude that [CII] can be used for measurements of SFR on both global and kiloparsec scales in normal star-forming galaxies in the absence of strong active galactic nuclei (AGN). The uncertainty of the $\Sigma_{\rm [CII]}-\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ calibration is $\pm$0.21 dex. The main source of scatter in the correlation is associated with regions that exhibit warm IR colors, and we provide an adjustment based on IR color that reduces the scatter. We show that the color-adjusted $\Sigma_{\rm[CII]}-\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ correlation is valid over almost 5 orders of magnitude in $\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$, holding for both normal star-forming galaxies and non-AGN luminous infrared galaxies. Using [CII] luminosity instead of surface brightness to estimate SFR suffers from worse systematics, frequently underpredicting SFR in luminous infrared galaxies even after IR color adjustment (although this depends on the SFR measure employed). We suspect that surface brightness relations are better behaved than the luminosity relations because the former are more closely related to the local far-UV field strength, most likely the main parameter controlling the efficiency of the conversion of far-UV radiation into gas heating. A simple model based on Starburst99 population-synthesis code to connect SFR to [CII] finds that heating efficiencies are $1\%-3\%$ in normal galaxies.
  • We model the infrared to submillimeter spectral energy distribution of 11 nearby galaxies of the KINGFISH sample using Spitzer and Herschel data and compare model extrapolations at 870um (using different fitting techniques) with LABOCA 870um observations. We investigate how the differences between predictions and observations vary with model assumptions or environment. At global scales, we find that modified blackbody models using realistic cold emissivity indices (beta_c=2 or 1.5) are able to reproduce the 870um observed emission within the uncertainties for most of the sample. Low values (beta_c<1.3) would be required in NGC0337, NGC1512 and NGC7793. At local scales, we observe a systematic 870um excess when using beta_=2.0. The beta_c=1.5 or the Draine and Li (2007) models can reconcile predictions with observations in part of the disks. Some of the remaining excesses occur towards the centres and can be partly or fully accounted for by non-dust contributions such as CO(3-2) or, to a lesser extent, free-free or synchrotron emission. In three non-barred galaxies, the remaining excesses rather occur in the disk outskirts. This could be a sign of a flattening of the submm slope (and decrease of the effective emissivity index) with radius in these objects.
  • We derive the distribution of the synchrotron spectral index across NGC6946 and investigate the correlation between the radio continuum (synchrotron) and far-infrared (FIR) emission using the KINGFISH Herschel PACS and SPIRE data. The radio--FIR correlation is studied as a function of star formation rate, magnetic field strength, radiation field strength, and the total gas surface brightness. The synchrotron emission follows both star-forming regions and the so-called magnetic arms present in the inter-arm regions. The synchrotron spectral index is steepest along the magnetic arms ($\alpha_n \sim 1$), while it is flat in places of giant H{\sc ii} regions and in the center of the galaxy ($\alpha_n \sim 0.6-0.7$). The map of $\alpha_n$ provides an observational evidence for aging and energy loss of cosmic ray electrons propagating in the disk of the galaxy. Variations in the synchrotron--FIR correlation across the galaxy are shown to be a function of both star formation and magnetic fields. We find that the synchrotron emission correlates better with cold rather than with warm dust emission, when the interstellar radiation field is the main heating source of dust. The synchrotron--FIR correlation suggests a coupling between the magnetic field and the gas density. NGC6946 shows a power-law behavior between the total (turbulent) magnetic field strength B and the star formation rate surface density $\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ with an index of 0.14\,(0.16)$\pm$0.01. This indicates an efficient production of the turbulent magnetic field with the increasing gas turbulence expected in actively star forming regions. The scale-by-scale analysis of the synchrotron--FIR correlation indicates that the ISM affects the propagation of old/diffused cosmic ray electrons, resulting in a diffusion coefficient of $D_0=4.6\times 10^{28}$\,cm$^2$\,s$^{-1}$ for 2.2\,GeV CREs.
  • We examine Herschel Space Observatory images of one nearby prototypical outer ring galaxy, NGC 1291, and show that the ring becomes more prominent at wavelengths longer than 160um. The mass of cool dust in the ring dominates the total dust mass of the galaxy, accounting for at least 70% of it. The temperature of the emitting dust in the ring (T=19.5+/-0.3K) is cooler than that of the inner galaxy (T=25.7+/-0.7K). We discuss several explanations for the difference in dust temperature, including age and density differences in the stellar populations of the ring versus the bulge.
  • We report the discovery of a supernova (SN) with the highest apparent energy output to date and conclude that it represents an extreme example of the Type IIn subclass. The SN, which was discovered behind the Large Magellanic Cloud at z = 0.289 by the SuperMACHO microlensing survey, peaked at M_R = -21.5 mag and only declined by 2.9 mag over 4.7 years after the peak. Over this period, SN 2003ma had an integrated bolometric luminosity of 4 x 10^51 ergs, more than any other SN to date. The radiated energy is close to the limit allowed by conventional core-collapse explosions. Optical spectra reveal that SN 2003ma has persistent single-peaked intermediate-width hydrogen lines, a signature of interaction between the SN and a dense circumstellar medium. The light curves show further evidence for circumstellar interaction, including a long plateau with a shape very similar to the classic SN IIn 1988Z -- however, SN 2003ma is ten times more luminous at all epochs. The fast velocity measured for the intermediate-width H_alpha component (~6000 km/s) points towards an extremely energetic explosion (> 10^52 ergs), which imparts a faster blast-wave speed to the post-shock material and a higher luminosity from the interaction than is observed in typical SNe IIn. Mid-infrared observations of SN 2003ma suggest an infrared light echo is produced by normal interstellar dust at a distance ~0.5 pc from the SN.
  • The quantity of dust in a spiral disk can be estimated using the dust's typical emission or the extinction of a known source. In this paper, we compare two techniques, one based on emission and one on absorption, applied on sections of fourteen disk galaxies. The two measurements reflect, respectively the average and apparent optical depth of a disk section. Hence, they depend differently on the average number and optical depth of ISM structures in the disk. The small scale geometry of the cold ISM is critical for accurate models of the overall energy budget of spiral disks. ISM geometry, relative contributions of different stellar populations and dust emissivity are all free parameters in galaxy Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) models; they are also sometimes degenerate, depending on wavelength coverage. Our aim is to constrain typical ISM geometry. The apparent optical depth measurement comes from the number of distant galaxies seen in HST images through the foreground disk. We measure the IR flux in images from the {\it Spitzer} Infrared Nearby Galaxy Survey in the same section of the disk that was covered by HST. A physical model of the dust is fit to the SED to estimate the dust surface density, mean temperature, and brightness in these disk sections. The surface density is subsequently converted into the average optical depth estimate. The two measurements generally agree. The ratios between the measured average and apparent optical depths of the disk sections imply optically thin clouds in these disks. Optically thick disks, are likely to have more than a single cloud along the line-of-sight.
  • [abridged] We present observations of the dust and atomic gas phase in seven dwarf irregular galaxies of the M81 group from the SINGS and THINGS surveys. The Spitzer observations provide a first glimpse of the nature of the non-atomic ISM in these metal-poor (Z~0.1 Z_sun), quiescent (SFR~0.001-0.1 M_sun/yr) dwarf galaxies. Dust emission is detected in five out of the seven targets. Most detected dust emission is restricted to HI column densities >1x10^21 cm^-2. Spitzer spectroscopy of two regions in the brightest galaxies (IC 2574 and Holmberg II) show distinctly different spectral shapes. The spectrum of IC 2574 shows aromatic features that are less luminous (relative to the FIR luminosity) compared to an average SINGS spiral galaxy by a factor of \~7 . The aromatic features in Holmberg~II (which has only a slightly lower gas-phase metallicity) are fainter than in IC 2574 by an order of magnitude. This result emphazises that the strength of the aromatic features is not a simple linear function of metallicity. We estimate dust masses of ~10^4-10^6 M_sun for the M81 dwarf galaxies, resulting in an average dust--to--gas ratio (M_dust/M_HI) of ~3x10^-4 (1.5x10^-3 if only the HI that is associated with dust emission is considered); this is an order of magnitude lower than the typical value derived for the SINGS spirals. The dwarf galaxies are underluminous per unit star formation rate at 70um as compared to the more massive galaxies in SINGS by a factor of ~2. However, the average 70um/160um ratio in the sample dwarf galaxies is higher than what is found in the other galaxies of the SINGS sample. This can be explained by a combination of a lower dust content in conjunction with a higher dust temperature in the dwarfs.