• We analyse a sample of 8 highly magnified galaxies at redshift 0.6<z<1.5 observed with MUSE, exploring the resolved properties of these galaxies at sub-kiloparsec scales. Combining multi-band HST photometry and MUSE spectra, we derive the stellar mass, global star formation rates, extinction and metallicity from multiple nebular lines, concluding that our sample is representative of z~1 star-forming galaxies. We derive the 2D kinematics of these galaxies from the [OII] emission and model it with a new method that accounts for lensing effects and fits multiple images simultaneously. We use these models to calculate the 2D beam-smearing correction and derive intrinsic velocity dispersion maps. We find them to be fairly homogeneous, with relatively constant velocity dispersions between 15 - 80 km/s and Gini coefficient of <0.3. We do not find any evidence for higher (or lower) velocity dispersions at the positions of bright star-forming clumps. We derive resolved maps of dust attenuation and attenuation-corrected star formation rates from emission lines for two objects in the sample. We use this information to study the relation between resolved star formation rate and velocity dispersion. We find that these quantities are not correlated, and the high-velocity dispersions found for relatively low star-forming densities seems to indicate that, at sub-kiloparsec scales, turbulence in high-z discs is mainly dominated by gravitational instability rather than stellar feedback.
  • The Virgo Environmental Survey Tracing Ionised Gas Emission (VESTIGE) is a blind narrow-band Halpha+[NII] imaging survey carried out with MegaCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. The survey covers the whole Virgo cluster region from its core to one virial radius (104 deg^2). The sensitivity of the survey is of f(Halpha) ~ 4 x 10^-17 erg sec-1 cm^-2 (5 sigma detection limit) for point sources and Sigma (Halpha) ~ 2 x 10^-18 erg sec^-1 cm^-2 arcsec^-2 (1 sigma detection limit at 3 arcsec resolution) for extended sources, making VESTIGE the deepest and largest blind narrow-band survey of a nearby cluster. This paper presents the survey in all its technical aspects, including the survey design, the observing strategy, the achieved sensitivity in both the narrow-band Halpha+[NII] and in the broad-band r filter used for the stellar continuum subtraction, the data reduction, calibration, and products, as well as its status after the first observing semester. We briefly describe the Halpha properties of galaxies located in a 4x1 deg^2 strip in the core of the cluster north of M87, where several extended tails of ionised gas are detected. This paper also lists the main scientific motivations of VESTIGE, which include the study of the effects of the environment on galaxy evolution, the fate of the stripped gas in cluster objects, the star formation process in nearby galaxies of different type and stellar mass, the determination of the Halpha luminosity function and of the Halpha scaling relations down to ~ 10^6 Mo stellar mass objects, and the reconstruction of the dynamical structure of the Virgo cluster. This unique set of data will also be used to study the HII luminosity function in hundreds of galaxies, the diffuse Halpha+[NII] emission of the Milky Way at high Galactic latitude, and the properties of emission line galaxies at high redshift.
  • MHONGOOSE is a deep survey of the neutral hydrogen distribution in a representative sample of 30 nearby disk and dwarf galaxies with HI masses from 10^6 to ~10^{11} M_sun, and luminosities from M_R ~ -12 to M_R ~ -22. The sample is selected to uniformly cover the available range in log(M_HI). Our extremely deep observations, down to HI column density limits of well below 10^{18} cm^{-2} - or a few hundred times fainter than the typical HI disks in galaxies - will directly detect the effects of cold accretion from the intergalactic medium and the links with the cosmic web. These observations will be the first ever to probe the very low-column density neutral gas in galaxies at these high resolutions. Combination with data at other wavelengths, most of it already available, will enable accurate modelling of the properties and evolution of the mass components in these galaxies and link these with the effects of environment, dark matter distribution, and other fundamental properties such as halo mass and angular momentum. MHONGOOSE can already start addressing some of the SKA-1 science goals and will provide a comprehensive inventory of the processes driving the transformation and evolution of galaxies in the nearby universe at high resolution and over 5 orders of magnitude in column density. It will be a Nearby Galaxies Legacy Survey that will be unsurpassed until the advent of the SKA, and can serve as a highly visible, lasting statement of MeerKAT's capabilities.
  • We use hydrodynamical simulations of a Cartwheel-like ring galaxy, modelled as a nearly head-on collision of a small companion with a larger disc galaxy, to probe the evolution of the gaseous structures and flows, and to explore the physical conditions setting the star formation activity. Star formation is first quenched by tides as the companion approaches, before being enhanced shortly after the collision. The ring ploughs the disc material as it radially extends, and almost simultaneously depletes its stellar and gaseous reservoir into the central region, through the spokes, and finally dissolve 200 Myr after the collision. Most of star formation first occurs in the ring before this activity is transferred to the spokes and then the nucleus. We thus propose that the location of star formation traces the dynamical stage of ring galaxies, and could help constrain their star formation histories. The ring hosts tidal compression associated with strong turbulence. This compression yields an azimuthal asymmetry, with maxima reached in the side furthest away from the nucleus, which matches the star formation activity distribution in our models and in observed ring systems. The interaction triggers the formation of star clusters significantly more massive than before the collision, but less numerous than in more classical galaxy interactions. The peculiar geometry of Cartwheel-like objects thus yields a star (cluster) formation activity comparable to other interacting objects, but with notable second order differences in the nature of turbulence, the enhancement of the star formation rate, and the number of massive clusters formed.
  • We present the kinematic analysis of a sub-sample of 82 galaxies at $\mathrm{0.75<z<1.2}$ from our new survey HR-COSMOS aimed to obtain the first statistical study on the kinematics of star-forming galaxies in the treasury COSMOS field at $\mathrm{0<z<1.2}$. We observed $\sim\,$766 emission line galaxies using the multi-slit spectrograph ESO-VLT/VIMOS in high-resolution mode (R=2500). To better extract galaxy kinematics, VIMOS spectral slits have been carefully tilted along the major axis orientation of the galaxies, making use of the position angle measurements from the high spatial resolution ACS/HST COSMOS images. We constrained the kinematics of the sub-sample at $0.75<z<1.2$ by creating high resolution semi-analytical models. We established the stellar-mass Tully-Fisher relation at $z\simeq 0.9$ with high-quality stellar mass measurements derived using the latest COSMOS photometric catalog, which includes the latest data releases of UltraVISTA and Spitzer. In doubling the sample at these redshifts compared with the literature, we estimated the relation without setting its slope, and found it consistent with previous studies in other deep extragalactic fields assuming no significant evolution of the relation with redshift at $z\lesssim1$. We computed dynamical masses within the radius R$_{2.2}$ and found a median stellar-to-dynamical mass fraction equal to 0.2 (assuming Chabrier IMF), which implies a contribution of gas and dark matter masses of 80% of the total mass within R$_{2.2}$, in agreement with recent integral field spectroscopy surveys. We find no dependence of the stellar-mass Tully-Fisher relation with environment probing up to group scale masses. This study shows that multi-slit galaxy surveys remain a powerful tool to derive kinematics for large numbers of galaxies at both high and low redshift.
  • (Abridged) We make use of the deepest VLT/MUSE observations performed so far on the Hubble Deep Field South (HDFS) to characterize the low-mass (< $10^{10}$M$_\odot$) galaxy population at intermediate redshift. We identify a sample of 28 spatially-resolved emission-line galaxies in the deep (27h integration time) MUSE data cube, spread over a redshift interval of 0.2 < z < 1.4. The public HST images and multi-band photometry over the HDFS are used to constrain the stellar mass and star formation rate (SFR) of the galaxies and to perform a morphological analysis. We derive the resolved ionized gas properties of these galaxies from the MUSE data and model the disk (both in 2D and with GalPaK$^{\rm 3D}$) to retrieve their intrinsic gas kinematics. We build a sample of resolved emission-line galaxies of much lower stellar mass and SFR (by $\sim$1-2 orders of magnitude) than previous 3D spectroscopic surveys. Most of the spatially-resolved MUSE-HDFS galaxies have gas kinematics consistent with disk-like rotation, but about 20% have velocity dispersions larger than the rotation velocities, and 30% are part of a close pair and/or show clear signs of recent gravitational interactions. In the high-mass regime, the MUSE-HDFS galaxies follow the Tully-Fisher relation defined from previous surveys in a similar redshift range. This scaling relation extends also to lower masses/velocities but with a higher dispersion. The MUSE-HDFS galaxies follow the scaling relations defined in the local universe between the specific angular momentum and the stellar mass. However, we find that intermediate-redshift star-forming galaxies fill a continuum transition from the spiral to elliptical local scaling relations, according to the dynamical state of the gas. This indicates that some galaxies may lose their angular momentum and become dispersion-dominated prior to becoming passive.
  • We use a background quasar to detect the presence of circum-galactic gas around a $z=0.91$ low-mass star forming galaxy. Data from the new Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) on the VLT show that the host galaxy has a dust-corrected star-formation rate (SFR) of 4.7$\pm$0.2 Msun/yr, with no companion down to 0.22 Msun/yr (5 $\sigma$) within 240 kpc (30"). Using a high-resolution spectrum (UVES) of the background quasar, which is fortuitously aligned with the galaxy major axis (with an azimuth angle $\alpha$ of only $15^\circ$), we find, in the gas kinematics traced by low-ionization lines, distinct signatures consistent with those expected for a "cold flow disk" extending at least 12 kpc ($3\times R_{1/2}$). We estimate the mass accretion rate $\dot M_{\rm in}$ to be at least two to three times larger than the SFR, using the geometric constraints from the IFU data and the HI column density of $\log N_{\rm HI} \simeq 20.4$ obtained from a {\it HST}/COS NUV spectrum. From a detailed analysis of the low-ionization lines (e.g. ZnII, CrII, TiII, MnII, SiII), the accreting material appears to be enriched to about 0.4 $Z_\odot$ (albeit with large uncertainties: $\log Z/Z_\odot=-0.4~\pm~0.4$), which is comparable to the galaxy metallicity ($12+\log \rm O/H=8.7\pm0.2$), implying a large recycling fraction from past outflows. Blue-shifted MgII and FeII absorptions in the galaxy spectrum from the MUSE data reveal the presence of an outflow. The MgII and FeII doublet ratios indicate emission infilling due to scattering processes, but the MUSE data do not show any signs of fluorescent FeII* emission.
  • We present Rc-band surface photometry for 170 of the 203 galaxies in GHASP, Gassendi H-Alpha survey of SPirals, a sample of late-type galaxies for which high-resolution Fabry-Perot H{\alpha} maps have previously been obtained. Our data set is constructed by new Rc-band observations taken at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP), supplemented with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) archival data, obtained with the purpose of deriving homogeneous photometric profiles and parameters. Our results include Rc-band surface brightness profiles for 170 galaxies and $ugriz$ profiles for 108 of these objects. We catalogue several parameters of general interest for further reference, such as total magnitude, effective radius and isophotal parameters -- magnitude, position angle, ellipticity and inclination. We also perform a structural decomposition of the surface brightness profiles using a multi-component method in order to separate disks from bulges and bars, and to observe the main scaling relations involving luminosities, sizes and maximum velocities. We determine the Rc-band Tully Fisher relation using maximum velocities derived solely from H$\alpha$ rotation curves for a sample of 80 galaxies, resulting in a slope of $-8.1 \pm 0.5$, zero point of $-3.0 \pm 1.0$ and an estimated intrinsic scatter of $0.28 \pm 0.07$. We note that, different from the TF-relation in the near-infrared derived for the same sample, no change in the slope of the relation is seen at the low-mass end (for galaxies with $V_{max} < 125$ km/s). We suggest that this different behaviour of the Tully Fisher relation (with the optical relation being described by a single power-law while the near-infrared by two) may be caused by differences in the stellar mass to light ratio for galaxies with $V_{max} < 125$ km/s.
  • The MASSIV (Mass Assembly Survey with SINFONI in VVDS) project aims at finding constraints on the different processes involved in galaxy evolution. This study proposes to improve the understanding of the galaxy mass assembly through chemical evolution using the metallicity as a tracer of the star formation and interaction history. Methods. We analyse the full sample of MASSIV galaxies for which a metallicity estimate has been possible, that is 48 star-forming galaxies at $z\sim 0.9-1.8$, and compute the integrated values of some fundamental parameters, such as the stellar mass, the metallicity and the star formation rate (SFR). The sample of star-forming galaxies at similar redshift from zCOSMOS (P\'erez-Montero et al. 2013) is also combined with the MASSIV sample. We study the cosmic evolution of the mass-metallicty relation (MZR) together with the effect of close environment and galaxy kinematics on this relation. We then focus on the so-called fundamental metallicity relation (FMR) proposed by Mannucci et al. (2010) and other relations between stellar mass, SFR and metallicity as studied by Lara-L\'opez et al. (2010). We investigate if these relations are really fundamental, i.e. if they do not evolve with redshift. Results. The MASSIV galaxies follow the expected mass-metallicity relation for their median redshift. We find however a significant difference between isolated and interacting galaxies as found for local galaxies: interacting galaxies tend to have a lower metallicity. The study of the relation between stellar mass, SFR and metallicity gives such large scattering for our sample, even combined with zCOSMOS, that it is diffcult to confirm or deny the existence of a fundamental relation.
  • We aim at addressing the questions related to galaxy mass assembly through major and minor wet merging processes in the redshift range 1<z<2. A consequent fraction of Milky Way like galaxies are thought to have undergone an unstable clumpy phase at this early stage. Using the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES, with a recent physically-motivated implementation of stellar feedback, we build the Merging and Isolated high-Redshift Adaptive mesh refinement Galaxies (MIRAGE) sample. It is composed of 20 mergers and 3 isolated idealized disks simulations with global physical properties in accordance with the 1<z<2 mass complete sample MASSIV. The numerical hydrodynamical resolution reaches 7 parsecs in the smallest Eulerian cells. Our simulations include: star formation, metal line cooling, metallicity advection, and a recent implementation of stellar feedback which encompasses OB-type stars radiative pressure, photo-ionization heating, and supernovae. The initial conditions are set to match the z~2 observations, thanks to a new public code DICE. The numerical resolution allows us to follow the formation and evolution of giant clumps formed in-situ from Jeans instabilities triggered by high initial gas fraction. The star formation history of isolated disks shows stochastic star formation rate, which proceeds from the complex behavior of the giant clumps. Our minor and major gas-rich merger simulations do not trigger starbursts, suggesting a saturation of the star formation in a turbulent and clumpy interstellar medium fed by substantial accretion from the circum-galactic medium. Our simulations are close to the normal regime of the disk-like star formation on a Schmidt-Kennicutt diagram. The mass-size relation and its rate of evolution matches observations, suggesting that the inside-out growth mechanisms of the stellar disk do not necessarily require to be achieved through a cold accretion.
  • We aim to measure the major merger rate of star-forming galaxies at 0.9 < z <1.8, using close pairs identified from integral field spectroscopy (IFS). We use the velocity field maps obtained with SINFONI/VLT on the MASSIV sample, selected from the star-forming population in the VVDS. We identify physical pairs of galaxies from the measurement of the relative velocity and the projected separation (r_p) of the galaxies in the pair. Using the well constrained selection function of the MASSIV sample we derive the gas-rich major merger fraction (luminosity ratio mu = L_2/L_1 >= 1/4), and, using merger time scales from cosmological simulations, the gas-rich major merger rate at a mean redshift up to z = 1.54. We find a high gas-rich major merger fraction of 20.8+15.2-6.8 %, 20.1+8.0-5.1 % and 22.0+13.7-7.3 % for close pairs with r_p <= 20h^-1 kpc in redshift ranges z = [0.94, 1.06], [1.2, 1.5) and [1.5, 1.8), respectively. This translates into a gas-rich major merger rate of 0.116+0.084-0.038 Gyr^-1, 0.147+0.058-0.037 Gyr^-1 and 0.127+0.079-0.042 Gyr^-1 at z = 1.03, 1.32 and 1.54, respectively. Combining our results with previous studies at z < 1, the gas-rich major merger rate evolves as (1+z)^n, with n = 3.95 +- 0.12, up to z = 1.5. From these results we infer that ~35% of the star-forming galaxies with stellar masses M = 10^10 - 10^10.5 M_Sun have undergone a major merger since z ~ 1.5. We develop a simple model which shows that, assuming that all gas-rich major mergers lead to early-type galaxies, the combined effect of gas-rich and dry mergers is able to explain most of the evolution in the number density of massive early-type galaxies since z ~ 1.5, with our measured gas-rich merger rate accounting for about two-thirds of this evolution.
  • We used K-band photometry, maximum rotational velocities derived from Fabry-Perot data and HI observed and predicted masses to study, for the first time, the K-band, stellar and baryonic Tully-Fisher relations for galaxies in Hickson compact groups. We compared these relations with the ones defined for galaxies in less dense environments from the GHASP survey and from a sample of gas-rich galaxies. We find that most of the Hickson compact group galaxies lie on the K-band Tully-Fisher relation defined by field galaxies with a few low-mass outliers, namely HCG 49b and HCG 96c, which appear to have had strong recent burst of star formation. The stellar Tully-Fisher relation for compact group galaxies presents a similar dispersion to that of the K-band relation, and it has no significant outliers when a proper computation of the stellar mass is done for the strongly star-forming galaxies. The scatter in these relations can be reduced if the gaseous component is taken into account, i.e., if a baryonic Tully-Fisher relation is considered. In order to explain the positions of the galaxies off the K-band Tully-Fisher relation we favour a scenario in which their luminosities are brightened due to strong star formation or AGN activity. We argue that strong bursts of star formation can affect the B and K-band luminosities of HCG 49b and HCG 96c and in the case of the latter also AGN activity may affect the K-band magnitude considerably, without affecting their total masses.
  • MASSIV (Mass Assembly Survey with SINFONI in VVDS) is a sample of 84 distant star-forming galaxies observed with the SINFONI Integral Field Unit (IFU) on the VLT. These galaxies are selected inside a redshift range of 0.8 < z < 1.9, i.e. where they are between 3 and 5 billion years old. The sample aims to probe the dynamical and chemical abundances properties of representative galaxies of this cosmological era. On the one hand, close environment study shows that about a third of the sample is involved in major mergers. On the other hand, kinematical analysis revealed that 42% of the sample is rotating disks, in accordance with higher redshift samples. The remaining 58% show complex kinematics, suggesting a dynamical support based on dispersion, and about half of these galaxies is involved in major mergers. Spheroids, unrelaxed merger remnants, or extremely turbulent disks might be an explanation for such a behavior. Furthermore, the spatially resolved metallicity analysis reveals positive gradients, adding a piece to the puzzle of galaxies evolution scenarios.
  • MASSIV (Massiv Assembly Survey with SINFONI in VVDS) is an ESO large program which consists of 84 star-forming galaxies, spanning in a wide range of stellar masses, observed with the IFU SINFONI on the VLT, in the redshift range 1 < z < 2. To be representative of the normal galaxy population, the sample has been selected from a well-defined, complete and representative parent sample. The kinematics of individual galaxies reveals that 58% of the galaxies are slow rotators, which means that a high fraction of these galaxies should probably be formed through major merger processes which might have produced gaseous thick or spheroidal structures supported by velocity dispersion rather than by rotation. Computations on the major merger rate from close pairs indicate that a typical star-forming galaxy underwent ~0.4 major mergers since ~9.5 Gyr, showing that merging is a major process driving mass assembly into the red sequence galaxies. These objects are also intriguing due to the fact that more than one galaxy over four is more metal-rich in its outskirts than in its center.
  • How mass assembly occurs in galaxies and which process(es) contribute to this activity are among the most highly debated questions in galaxy formation theories. This has motivated our survey MASSIV of 0.9<z<1.9 star-forming galaxies selected from the purely flux-limited VVDS redshift survey. For the first time, we derive the relations between galaxy size, mass, and internal velocity, and the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation, from a statistically representative sample of star-forming galaxies. We find a dynamical mass that agrees with those of rotating galaxies containing a gas fraction of ~20%, perfectly consistent with the content derived using the Kennicutt-Schmidt formulation and the expected evolution. Non-rotating galaxies have more compact sizes for their stellar component, and are less massive than rotators, but do not have statistically different sizes for their gas-component. We measure a marginal evolution in the size-stellar mass and size-velocity relations in which discs become evenly smaller with cosmic time at fixed stellar mass or velocity, and are less massive at a given velocity than in the local Universe. The scatter in the Tully-Fisher relation is smaller when we introduce the S05 index, which we interpret as evidence of an increase in the contribution to galactic kinematics of turbulent motions with cosmic time. We report a persistently large scatter for rotators in our relations, that we suggest is intrinsic, and possibly caused by complex physical mechanism(s) at work in our stellar mass/luminosity regime and redshift range. Our results consistently point towards a mild, net evolution of these relations, comparable to those predicted by cosmological simulations of disc formation for at least 8Gyr and a dark halo strongly coupled with galactic spectrophotometric properties.
  • (Abridged) Processes driving mass assembly are expected to evolve on different timescales along cosmic time. A transition might happen around z ~ 1 as the cosmic star formation rate starts its decrease. Identifying the dynamical nature of galaxies on a representative sample is necessary to infer and compare the mass assembly mechanisms across cosmic time. We present an analysis of the kinematics properties of 50 galaxies with 0.9 < z < 1.6 from the MASSIV sample observed with SINFONI/VLT with 4.5x10^9 Msun < M < 1.7x10^11 Msun and 6 Msun/yr < SFR < 300 Msun/yr. This is the largest sample with 2D-kinematics in this redshift range. We provide a classification based on kinematics as well as on close galaxy environment. We find that 29% of galaxies are experiencing merging or have close companions that may be gravitationally linked. This is placing a lower limit on the fraction of interacting galaxies. We find that at least 44% of the galaxies display ordered rotation whereas at least 35% are non-rotating objects. All rotators except one are compatible with rotation-dominated (Vmax/sigma > 1) systems. Non-rotating objects are mainly small objects (Re < 4 kpc). Combining our sample with other 3D-spectroscopy samples, we find that the local velocity dispersion of the ionized gas component decreases continuously from z ~ 3 to z = 0. The proportion of disks also seems to be increasing in star-forming galaxies when the redshift decreases. The number of interacting galaxies seems to be at a maximum at z ~ 1.2. These results draw a picture in which cold gas accretion may still be efficient at z ~ 1.2 but in which mergers may play a much more significant role at z ~ 1.2 than at higher redshift. From a dynamical point of view, the redshift range 1 < z < 2 therefore appears as a transition period in the galaxy mass assembly process.
  • A key open issue for galaxy evolution and formation models is the understanding of the different mechanisms of galaxy assembly at various cosmic epochs. The aim of this study is to derive the global and spatially-resolved metal content in high-redshift galaxies. Using VLT/SINFONI IFU spectroscopy of a first sample of 50 galaxies at z~1.2 in the MASSIV survey, we are able to measure the Ha and [NII]6584 emission lines. Using the N2 ratio as a proxy for oxygen abundance in the interstellar medium, we measure the metallicity of the sample galaxies. We develop a tool to extract spectra in annular regions of these galaxies, leading to a spatially-resolved estimate of the oxygen abundance in each galaxy. We derive a metallicity gradient for 26 galaxies in our sample and discover a significant fraction of galaxies with a "positive" gradient. Using a simple chemical evolution model, we derive infall rates of pristine gas onto the disks. Seven galaxies display a positive gradient at a high confidence level. Four out of these are interacting and one is a chain galaxy. We suggest that interactions might be responsible for shallowing and even inverting the abundance gradient. We also identify two interesting correlations in our sample: a) galaxies with higher gas velocity dispersion have shallower/positive gradients; and b) metal-poor galaxies tend to show a positive gradient whereas metal-rich ones tend to show a negative one. This last observation can be explained by the infall of metal-poor gas into the center of the disks. We address the question of the origin of this infall under the influence of gas flows triggered by interactions and/or cold gas accretion.
  • Understanding how galaxies evolve and assemble their mass across cosmic time is still a fundamental unsolved issue. To get insight into the various processes of galaxy mass assembly, the Mass Assembly Survey with SINFONI in VVDS (MASSIV) aims at probing the kinematical and chemical properties of a significant and representative sample of high-redshift (0.9 < z < 1.8) star-forming galaxies. This paper presents the selection function, the observing strategy and the global properties of the MASSIV sample. This sample contains 84 star-forming galaxies, selected from the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) and observed with the SINFONI IFU at the VLT. We present the redshift distribution, and derive the stellar masses and SED-based star formation rates (SFR). Integrated metallicities and the presence of type-2 AGNs are investigated using composite 1D spectra built from VIMOS and SINFONI observations. The MASSIV selection function, based on star formation criteria ([OII] emission-line strength up to z~1.5 and colors/UV absorption lines at higher redshifts), provides a good representation of "normal" star-forming galaxies with SED-based SFRs between 5 and 400 Msun/yr in the stellar mass regime 10^9 - 10^11 Msun. Analysis of typical emission-line ratios performed on composite spectra reveals that the contamination by type-2 AGNs is very low and that the integrated metallicity of the galaxies follows the well-known mass-metallicity relation. The MASSIV sample has been built upon a simple selection function, fully representative of the star-forming galaxy population at 0.9 < z < 1.8 for SFR > 5 Msun/yr. Together with the size of the sample, the spatially-resolved SINFONI data therefore enables us to discuss global, volume averaged, galaxy kinematic and chemical properties all accross the mass and SFR range of the survey to derive robust conclusions on galaxy mass assembly over cosmological timescales.
  • We studied, for the first time, the near infrared, stellar and baryonic Tully-Fisher relations for a sample of field galaxies taken from an homogeneous Fabry-Perot sample of galaxies (the GHASP survey). The main advantage of GHASP over other samples is that maximum rotational velocities were estimated from 2D velocity fields, avoiding assumptions about the inclination and position angle of the galaxies. By combining these data with 2MASS photometry, optical colors, HI masses and different mass-to-light ratio estimators, we found a slope of 4.48\pm0.38 and 3.64\pm0.28 for the stellar and baryonic Tully-Fisher relation, respectively. We found that these values do not change significantly when different mass-to-light ratios recipes were used. We also point out, for the first time, that rising rotation curves as well as asymmetric rotation curves show a larger dispersion in the Tully-Fisher relation than flat ones or than symmetric ones. Using the baryonic mass and the optical radius of galaxies, we found that the surface baryonic mass density is almost constant for all the galaxies of this sample. In this study we also emphasize the presence of a break in the NIR Tully-Fisher relation at M(H,K)\sim-20 and we confirm that late-type galaxies present higher total-to-baryonic mass ratios than early-type spirals, suggesting that supernova feedback is actually an important issue in late-type spirals. Due to the well defined sample selection criteria and the homogeneity of the data analysis, the Tully-Fisher relation for GHASP galaxies can be used as a reference for the study of this relation in other environments and at higher redshifts.
  • It has been suggested that diffuse ionized gas can extend all the way to the end of the HI disc, and even beyond, such as in the case of the warped galaxy NGC 253 (Bland-Hawthorn et al. 1997). Detecting ionized gas at these radii could carry significant implications as to the distribution of dark matter in galaxies. With the aim of detecting this gas, we carried out a deep Halpha kinematical analysis of two Sculptor group galaxies, NGC 247 and NGC 300. The Fabry-Perot data were taken at the 36-cm Marseille Telescope in La Silla, Chile, offering a large field of view. With almost 20 hours of observations for each galaxy, very faint diffuse emission is detected. Typical emission measures of 0.1 cm^-6 pc are reached. For NGC 247, emission extending up to a radius comparable with that of the HI disc (r~13') is found, but no emission is seen beyond the HI disc. For NGC 300, we detect ionized gas on the entirety of our field of view (r_max~14'), and find that the bright HII regions are embedded in a diffuse background. Using the deep data, extended optical rotation curves are obtained, as well as mass models. These are the most extended optical rotation curves thus far for these galaxies. We find no evidence suggesting that NGC 247 has a warped disc, and to account for our non detection of Halpha emission beyond its HI disc, as opposed to the warped galaxy NGC 253, our results favour the model in which only through a warp, ionization by hot young stars in the central region of a galaxy can let photons escape and ionize the interstellar medium in the outer parts.
  • Understanding the different mechanisms of galaxy assembly at various cosmic epochs is a key issue for galaxy evolution and formation models. We present MASSIV (Mass Assembly Survey with SINFONI in VVDS) in this context, an on-going survey with VLT/SINFONI aiming to probe the kinematics and chemical abundances of a unique sample of 84 star-forming galaxies selected in the redshift range z ~ 1-2. This large sample, spanning a wide range of stellar masses, is unique at these high redshifts and statistically representative of the overall galaxy population. In this paper, we give an overview of the MASSIV survey and then focus on the spatially-resolved chemical properties of high-z galaxies and their implication on the process of galaxy assembly.
  • This study presents a deep H{\alpha} kinematical analysis of the Sculptor Group galaxy NGC253. The Fabry-Perot data were taken with the 36-cm Marseille Telescope in La Silla, Chile, using an EMCCD detector. Typical emission measures of ~0.1 cm^-6 pc are reached. The observations allow the detection of the Diffuse Ionized Gas component through [N II] emission at very large radii of 11.5', 12.8' and 19.0', on the receding side of the galaxy. No H{\alpha} emission is observed at radii larger than the neutral component (11.5'). The very extended rotation curve confirms previous results and shows signs of a significant decline, on the order of 30 per cent vmax . Using the rotation data, mass models are constructed with and without the outer [N II] data points, and similar results are found. The declining part of the rotation curve is very well modeled, and seems to be truly declining.
  • We obtained new Fabry-Perot data cubes and derived velocity fields, monochromatic and velocity dispersion maps for 28 galaxies in the Hickson compact groups 37, 40, 47, 49, 54, 56, 68, 79 and 93. We find that one third of the non-barred compact group galaxies have position angle misalignments between the stellar and gaseous components. This and the asymmetric rotation curves are clear signatures of kinematic perturbations, probably due to interactions among compact group galaxies. A comparison between the B-band Tully-Fisher relation for compact group galaxies and that for the GHASP field-galaxy sample shows that, despite the high fraction of compact group galaxies with asymmetric rotation curves, these lie on the Tully-Fisher relation defined by galaxies in less dense environments, although with more scatter. This is in agreement with previous results, but now confirmed for a larger sample of 41 galaxies. We confirm the tendency for compact group galaxies at the low-mass end of the Tully-Fisher relation (HCG 49b, 89d, 96c, 96d and 100c) to have either a magnitude that is too bright for its mass (suggesting brightening by star formation) and/or a low maximum rotational velocity for its luminosity (suggesting tidal stripping). These galaxies are outside the Tully Fisher relation, at the 1 sigma level, even when the minimum acceptable values of inclinations are used to compute their maximum velocities. The inclusion of such galaxies with v<100 km/s in the determination of the zero point and slope of the compact group B-band Tully-Fisher relation would strongly change the fit, making it different from the relation for field galaxies, a fact that has to be kept in mind when studying scaling relations of interacting galaxies, specially at high redshifts.
  • We present the results of a multiwavelength campaign searching for young objects in the intragroup medium of seven compact groups of galaxies: HCG 2, 7, 22, 23, 92, 100 and NGC 92. We used Fabry-Perot velocity fields and rotation curves together with GALEX NUV and FUV images, optical R-band and HI maps to evaluate the stage of interaction of each group. We conclude that groups (i) HCG 7 and HCG 23 are in an early stage of interaction, (ii) HCG 2 and HCG 22 are mildly interacting, and (iii) HCG 92, HCG 100 and NGC 92 are in a late stage of evolution. Evolved groups have a population of young objects in their intragroup medium while no such population is found within the less evolved groups. We also report the discovery of a tidal dwarf galaxy candidate in the tail of NGC 92. These three groups, besides containing galaxies which have peculiar velocity fields, also show extended HI tails. Our results indicate that the advanced stage of evolution of a group together with the presence of intragroup HI clouds may lead to star formation in the intragroup medium.
  • This work aims to provide a first insight into the mass-metallicity (MZ) relation of star-forming galaxies at redshift z~1.4. To reach this goal, we present a first set of nine VVDS galaxies observed with the NIR integral-field spectrograph SINFONI on the VLT. Oxygen abundances are derived from empirical indicators based on the ratio between strong nebular emission-lines (Halpha, [NII]6584 and [SII]6717,6731). Stellar masses are deduced from SED fitting with Charlot & Bruzual (2007) population synthesis models, and star formation rates are derived from [OII]3727 and Halpha emission-line luminosities. We find a typical shift of 0.2-0.4 dex towards lower metallicities for the z~1.4 galaxies, compared to the MZ-relation in the local universe as derived from SDSS data. However, this small sample of eight galaxies does not show any clear correlation between stellar mass and metallicity, unlike other larger samples at different redshift (z~0, z~0.7, and z~2). Indeed, our galaxies lie just under the relation at z~2 and show a small trend for more massive galaxies to be more metallic (~0.1 logarithmic slope). There are two possible explanations to account for these observations. First, the most massive galaxies present higher specific star formation rates when compared to the global VVDS sample which could explain the particularly low metallicity of these galaxies as already shown in the SDSS sample. Second, inflow of metal-poor gas due to tidal interactions could also explain the low metallicity of these galaxies as two of these three galaxies show clear signatures of merging in their velocity fields. Finally, we find that the metallicity of 4 galaxies is lower by ~0.2 to 0.4 dex if we take into account the N/O abundance ratio in their metallicity estimate.