• In our Galaxy, star formation occurs in a variety of environments, with a large fraction of stars formed in clusters hosting massive stars. OB stars have an important feedback on the evolution of protoplanetary disks around nearby young stars and likely on the process of planet formation occurring in them. The nearby massive association Cygnus OB2 is an outstanding laboratory to study this feedback. It is the closest massive association to our Sun, and hosts hundreds of massive stars and thousands of low mass members. In this paper, we analyze the spatial variation of the disk fraction in Cygnus OB2 and we study its correlation with the local values of Far and Extreme ultraviolet radiation fields and the local stellar surface density. We present definitive evidence that disks are more rapidly dissipated in the regions of the association characterized by intense local UV field and large stellar density. In particular, the FUV radiation dominates disks dissipation timescales in the proximity (i.e. within 0.5 pc) of the O stars. In the rest of the association, EUV photons potentially induce a significant mass loss from the irradiated disks across the entire association, but the efficiency of this process is reduced at increasing distances from the massive stars due to absorption by the intervening intracluster material. We find that disk dissipation due to close stellar encounters is negligible in Cygnus OB2, and likely to have affected 1% or fewer of the stellar population. Disk dissipation is instead dominated by photoevaporation. We also compare our results to what has been found in other young clusters with different massive populations, concluding that massive associations like Cygnus OB2 are potentially hostile to protoplanetary disks, but that the environments where disks can safely evolve in planetary systems are likely quite common in our Galaxy.
  • Theoretical models of grain growth predict dust properties to change as a function of protoplanetary disk radius, mass, age and other physical conditions. We lay down the methodology for a multi-wavelength analysis of (sub-)mm and cm continuum interferometric observations to constrain self-consistently the disk structure and the radial variation of the dust properties. The computational architecture is massively parallel and highly modular. The analysis is based on the simultaneous fit in the uv-plane of observations at several wavelengths with a model for the disk thermal emission and for the dust opacity. The observed flux density at the different wavelengths is fitted by posing constraints on the disk structure and on the radial variation of the grain size distribution. We apply the analysis to observations of three protoplanetary disks (AS 209, FT Tau, DR Tau) for which a combination of spatially resolved observations in the range ~0.88mm to ~10mm is available (from SMA, CARMA, and VLA), finding evidence of a decreasing maximum dust grain size (a_max) with radius. We derive large a_max values up to 1 cm in the inner disk between 15 and 30 AU and smaller grains with a_max~1 mm in the outer disk (R > 80AU). In this paper we develop a multi-wavelength analysis that will allow this missing quantity to be constrained for statistically relevant samples of disks and to investigate possible correlations with disk or stellar parameters.
  • Ionising feedback from massive stars dramatically affects the interstellar medium local to star forming regions. Numerical simulations are now starting to include enough complexity to produce morphologies and gas properties that are not too dissimilar from observations. The comparison between the density fields produced by hydrodynamical simulations and observations at given wavelengths relies however on photoionisation/chemistry and radiative transfer calculations. We present here an implementation of Monte Carlo radiation transport through a Voronoi tessellation in the photoionisation and dust radiative transfer code MOCASSIN. We show for the first time a synthetic spectrum and synthetic emission line maps of an hydrodynamical simulation of a molecular cloud affected by massive stellar feedback. We show that the approach on which previous work is based, which remapped hydrodynamical density fields onto Cartesian grids before performing radiative transfer/photoionisation calculations, results in significant errors in the temperature and ionisation structure of the region. Furthermore, we describe the mathematical process of tracing photon energy packets through a Voronoi tessellation, including optimisations, treating problematic cases and boundary conditions. We perform various benchmarks using both the original version of MOCASSIN and the modified version using the Voronoi tessellation. We show that for uniform grids, or equivalently a cubic lattice of cell generating points, the new Voronoi version gives the same results as the original Cartesian-grid version of MOCASSIN for all benchmarks. For non-uniform initial conditions, such as using snapshots from Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics simulations, we show that the Voronoi version performs better than the Cartesian grid version, resulting in much better resolution in dense regions.
  • Most star clusters at an intermediate age (1-2 Gyr) in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds show a puzzling feature in their color-magnitude diagrams (CMD) that is not in agreement with a simple stellar population. The main sequence turn-off of these clusters is much broader than would be expected from photometric uncertainties. One interpretation of this feature is that age spreads of the order 200-500 Myr exist within individual clusters, although this interpretation is highly debated. Such large age spreads should affect other parts of the CMD, which are sensitive to age, as well. In this study, we analyze the CMDs of a sample of 12 intermediate-age clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud that all show an extended turn-off using archival optical data taken with the Hubble Space Telescope. We fit the star formation history of the turn-off region and the red clump region independently with two different theoretical isochrone models. We find that in most of the cases, the age spreads inferred from the red clumps are smaller than the ones resulting from the turn-off region. However, the age ranges resulting from the red clump region are broader than would be expected for a single age. Only two out of 12 clusters in our sample show a red clump which seems to be consistent with a single age. As our results are not unambiguous, we can not ultimately tell if the extended main sequence turn-off feature is due to an age spread, or not, by fitting the star formation histories to the red clump regions. However, we find that the width of the extended main sequence turn-off feature is correlated with the age of the clusters in a way which would be unexplained in the "age spread" interpretation, but which may be expected if stellar rotation is the cause of the spread at the turn-off.
  • We examine the combined effects of winds and photoionizing radiation from O--type stars on embedded stellar clusters formed in model turbulent molecular clouds covering a range of masses and radii. We find that feedback is able to increase the quantities of dense gas present, but decreases the rate and efficiency of the conversion of gas to stars relative to control simulations in which feedback is absent. Star formation in these calculations often proceeds at a rate substantially slower than the freefall rate in the dense gas. This decoupling is due to the weakening of, and expulsion of gas from, the deepest parts of the clouds' potential wells where most of the star formation occurs in the control simulations. This results in large fractions of the stellar populations in the feedback simulation becoming dissociated from dense gas. However, where star formation \emph{does} occur in both control and feedback simulations, it does so in dense gas, so the correlation between star formation activity and dense gas is preserved. The overall dynamical effects of feedback on the \emph{clusters} are minimal, with only small fraction of stars becoming unbound, despite large quantities of gas being expelled from some clouds. This owes to the settling of the stars into virialised and stellar--dominated configurations before the onset of feedback. By contrast, the effects of feedback on the observable properties of the clusters -- their U--, B-- and V--band magnitudes -- are strong and sudden. The timescales on which the clusters become visible and unobscured are short compared with the timescales which the clouds are actually destroyed.
  • Integral field unit (IFU) data of the iconic Pillars of Creation in M16 are presented. The ionisation structure of the pillars was studied in great detail over almost the entire visible wavelength range, and maps of the relevant physical parameters, e.g. extinction, electron density, electron temperature, line-of-sight velocity of the ionised and neutral gas are shown. In agreement with previous authors, we find that the pillar tips are being ionised and photo-evaporated by the massive members of the nearby cluster NGC 6611. They display a stratified ionisation structure where the emission lines peak in a descending order according to their ionisation energies. The IFU data allowed us to analyse the kinematics of the photo-evaporative flow in terms of the stratified ionisation structure, and we find that, in agreement with simulations, the photo-evaporative flow is traced by a blueshift in the position-velocity profile. The gas kinematics and ionisation structure have allowed us to produce a sketch of the 3D geometry of the Pillars, positioning the pillars with respect to the ionising cluster stars. We use a novel method to detect a previously unknown bipolar outflow at the tip of the middle pillar and suggest that it has an embedded protostar as its driving source. Furthermore we identify a candidate outflow in the leftmost pillar. With the derived physical parameters and ionic abundances, we estimate a mass loss rate due to the photo-evaporative flow of 70 M$_{\odot}$ Myr$^{-1}$ which yields an expected lifetime of approximately 3 Myr.
  • Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs) are observed to be turbulent, but theory shows that without a driving mechanism turbulence should quickly decay. The question arises by which mechanisms turbulence is driven or sustained. It has been shown that photoionising feedback from massive stars has an impact on the surrounding GMC and can for example create vast HII bubbles. We therefore address the question of whether turbulence is a consequence of this effect of feedback on the cloud. To investigate this, we analyse the velocity field of simulations of high mass star forming regions by studying velocity structure functions and power spectra. We find that clouds whose morphology is strongly affected by photoionising feedback also show evidence of driving of turbulence by preserving or recovering a Kolmogorov-type velocity field. On the contrary, control run simulations without photoionising feedback have a velocity distribution that bears the signature of gravitational collapse and of the dissipation of energy, where the initial Kolmogorov-type structure function is erased.
  • The discovery with the {\it Herschel Space Observatory} of bright far infrared and submm emission from the ejecta of the core collapse supernova SN\,1987A has been interpreted as indicating the presence of some 0.4--0.7\,M$_\odot$ of dust. We have constructed radiative transfer models of the ejecta to fit optical to far-infrared observations from the literature at epochs between 615 days and 24 years after the explosion, to determine when and where this unexpectedly large amount of dust formed. We find that the observations by day 1153 are consistent with the presence of 3$\times$10$^{-3}$M$_\odot$ of dust. Although this is a larger amount than has previously been considered possible at this epoch, it is still very small compared to the amount present in the remnant after 24 years, and significantly higher dust masses at the earlier epochs are firmly ruled out by the observations, indicating that the majority of the dust must have formed at very late times. By 8515-9200 days after the explosion, 0.6--0.8\,M$_\odot$ of dust is present, and dust grains with radii greater than 2\,$\mu$m are required to obtain a fit to the observed SED. This suggests that the dust mass increase at late times was caused by accretion onto and coagulation of the dust grains formed at earlier epochs. These findings provide further confirmation that core collapse supernovae can create large quantities of dust, and indicate that the reason for small dust masses being estimated in many cases is that the vast majority of the dust forms long after most supernovae have been detectable at mid-infrared wavelengths.
  • We model the combined effects of photoionization and momentum--driven winds from O--stars on molecular clouds spanning a parameter space of initial conditions. The dynamical effects of the winds are very modest. However, in the lower--mass clouds, they influence the morphologies of the HII regions by creating 10pc--scale central cavities.\\ The inhomogeneous structures of the model GMCs make them highly permeable to photons, ionized gas and supernova ejecta, and the leaking of ionized gas in particular strongly affects their evolution, reducing the effectiveness of feedback. Nevertheless, feedback is able to expel large fractions of the mass of the lower escape--velocity clouds. Its impact on star formation is more modest, decreasing final star formation efficiencies by 10--20$\%$, and the rate of change of the star formation efficiency per freefall time by about one third. However, the clouds still form stars substantially faster than observed GMCs.
  • Recent observations reveal that the central star of the planetary nebula Abell 48 exhibits spectral features similar to massive nitrogen-sequence Wolf-Rayet stars. This raises a pertinent question, whether it is still a planetary nebula or rather a ring nebula of a massive star. In this study, we have constructed a three-dimensional photoionization model of Abell 48, constrained by our new optical integral field spectroscopy. An analysis of the spatially resolved velocity distributions allowed us to constrain the geometry of Abell 48. We used the collisionally excited lines to obtain the nebular physical conditions and ionic abundances of nitrogen, oxygen, neon, sulphur and argon, relative to hydrogen. We also determined helium temperatures and ionic abundances of helium and carbon from the optical recombination lines. We obtained a good fit to the observations for most of the emission-line fluxes in our photoionization model. The ionic abundances deduced from our model are in decent agreement with those derived by the empirical analysis. However, we notice obvious discrepancies between helium temperatures derived from the model and the empirical analysis, as overestimated by our model. This could be due to the presence of a small fraction of cold metal-rich structures, which were not included in our model. It is found that the observed nebular line fluxes were best reproduced by using a hydrogen-deficient expanding model atmosphere as the ionizing source with an effective temperature of 70 kK and a stellar luminosity of 5500 L_sun, which corresponds to a relatively low-mass progenitor star (~ 3 M_sun) rather than a massive Pop I star.
  • We analyse current measurements of accretion rates onto pre-main sequence stars as a function of stellar mass, and conclude that the steep dependance of accretion rates on stellar mass is real and not driven by selection/detection threshold, as has been previously feared. These conclusions are reached by means of statistical tests including a survival analysis which can account for upper limits. The power-law slope of the Mdot-M* relation is found to be in the range of 1.6-1.9 for young stars with masses lower than 1 Msun. The measured slopes and distributions can be easily reproduced by means of a simple disc model which includes viscous accretion and X-ray photoevaporation. We conclude that the Mdot-M* relation in pre-main sequence stars bears the signature of disc dispersal by X-ray photoevaporation, suggesting that the relation is a straight- forward consequence of disc physics rather than an imprint of initial conditions.
  • We examine the effect of momentum-driven OB-star stellar winds on a parameter space of simulated turbulent Giant Molecular Clouds using SPH hydrodynamical simulations. By comparison with identical simulations in which ionizing radiation was included instead of winds, we show that momentum-driven winds are considerably less effective in disrupting their host clouds than are HII regions. The wind bubbles produced are smaller and generally smoother than the corresponding ionization-driven bubbles. Winds are roughly as effective in destroying the very dense gas in which the O-stars are embedded, and thus shutting down the main regions of star-forming activity in the model clouds. However, their influence falls off rapidly with distance from the sources, so they are not as good at sweeping up dense gas and triggering star formation further out in the clouds. As a result, their effect on the star formation rate and efficiency is generally more negative than that of ionization, if they exert any effect at all.
  • Low-mass young stellar objects are powerful emitters of X-rays that can ionize and heat the disks and the young planets they harbour. The X-rays produce molecular ions that affect the chemistry of the disk atmospheres and their spectroscopic signatures. Deeper down, X-rays are the main ionization source and influence the operation of the magnetorotational instability, believed to be the main driver for the angular momentum redistribution crucial for the accretion and formation of these pre main-sequence stars. X-ray ionization also affects the character of the dead zones around the disk midplane where terrestrial planets are likely to form. To obtain the physical and chemical effects of the stellar X-rays, their propagation through the disk has to be calculated taking into account both absorption and scattering. To date the only calculation of this type was done almost 15 years ago, and here we present new three-dimensional radiative transfer calculations of X-ray ionization rates in protoplanetary discs. Our study confirms the results from previous work for the same physical parameters. It also updates them by including a more detailed treatment of the radiative transfer and by using ionizing spectra and elemental abundance more appropriate for what is currently known about protoplanetary disks and their host stars. The new calculations for a typical ionizing spectrum yield respectively lower and higher ionisation rates at high and low column densities at a given radius in a disc. The differences can be up to an order of magnitude near 1 AU, depending on the abundances used
  • We present the fourth in a series of papers detailing our SPH study of the effects of ionizing feedback from O--type stars on turbulent star forming clouds. Here, we study the effects of photoionization on a series of initially partially unbound clouds with masses ranging from $10^{4}$--$10^{6}$M$_{\odot}$ and initial sizes from 2.5-45pc. We find that ionizing feedback profoundly affects the structure of the gas in most of our model clouds, creating large and often well-cleared bubble structures and pillars. However, changes in the structures of the embedded clusters produced are much weaker and not well correlated to the evolution of the gas. We find that in all cases, star formation efficiencies and rates are reduced by feedback and numbers of objects increased, relative to control simulations. We find that local triggered star formation does occur and that there is a good correlation between triggered objects and pillars or bubble walls, but that triggered objects are often spatially-mixed with those formed spontaneously. Some triggered objects acquire large enough masses to become ionizing sources themselves, lending support to the concept of propagating star formation. We find scant evidence for spatial age gradients in most simulations, and where we do see them, they are not a good indicator of triggering, as they apply equally to spontaneously-formed objects as triggered ones. Overall, we conclude that inferring the global or local effects of feedback on stellar populations from observing a system at a single epoch is very problematic.
  • We extend our previous SPH parameter study of the effects of photoionization from O-stars on star-forming clouds to include initially unbound clouds. We generate a set of model clouds in the mass range $10^{4}-10^{6}$M$_{\odot}$ with initial virial ratios $E_{\rm kin}/E_{\rm pot}$=2.3, allow them to form stars, and study the impact of the photoionizing radiation produced by the massive stars. We find that, on the 3Myr timescale before supernovae are expected to begin detonating, the fractions of mass expelled by ionizing feedback is a very strong function of the cloud escape velocities. High-mass clouds are largely unaffected dynamically, while lower-mass clouds have large fractions of their gas reserves expelled on this timescale. However, the fractions of stellar mass unbound are modest and significant portions of the unbound stars are so only because the clouds themselves are initially partially unbound. We find that ionization is much more able to create well-cleared bubbles in the unbound clouds, owing to their intrinsic expansion, but that the presence of such bubbles does not necessarily indicate that a given cloud has been strongly influenced by feedback. We also find, in common with the bound clouds from our earlier work, that many of the systems simulated here are highly porous to photons and supernova ejecta, and that most of them will likely survive their first supernova explosions.
  • The time-scale over which and the modality by which young stellar objects (YSOs) disperse their circumstellar discs dramatically influences the eventual formation and evolution of planetary systems. By means of extensive radiative transfer (RT) modelling, we have developed a new set of diagnostic diagrams in the infrared colour-colour plane (K-[24] vs. K-[8]), to aid with the classification of the evolutionary stage of YSOs from photometric observations. Our diagrams allow the differentiation of sources with unevolved (primordial) discs from those evolving according to different clearing scenarios (e.g. homologous depletion vs. inside-out dispersal), as well as from sources that have already lost their disc. Classification of over 1500 sources in 15 nearby star-forming regions reveals that approximately 39 % of the sources lie in the primordial disc region, whereas between 31 % and 32 % disperse from the inside-out and up to 22 % of the sources have already lost their disc. Less than 2 % of the objects in our sample lie in the homogeneous draining regime. Time-scales for the transition phase are estimated to be typically a few 10^5 years independent of stellar mass. Therefore, regardless of spectral type, we conclude that currently available infrared photometric surveys point to fast (of order 10 % of the global disc lifetime) inside-out clearing as the preferred mode of disc dispersal.
  • We present a detailed study of star formation occurring in bound star--forming clouds under the influence of internal ionizing feedback from massive stars across a spectrum of cloud properties. We infer which objects are triggered by comparing our feedback simulations with control simulations in which no feedback was present. We find feedback always results in a lower star--formation efficiency and usually but not always results in a larger number of stars or clusters. Cluster mass functions are not strongly affected by feedback, but stellar mass functions are biased towards lower masses. Ionization also affects the geometrical distribution of stars in ways that are robust against projection effects, but may make the stellar associations more or less subclustered depending on the background cloud environment. We observe a prominent pillar in one simulation which is the remains of an accretion flow feeding the central ionizing cluster of its host cloud and suggest that this may be a general formation mechanism for pillars such as those observed in M16. We find that the association of stars with structures in the gas such as shells or pillars is a good but by no means foolproof indication that those stars have been triggered and we conclude overall that it is very difficult to deduce which objects have been induced to form and which formed spontaneously simply from observing the system at a single time.
  • Aims: Grain growth has been suggested as one possible explanation for the diminished dust optical depths in the inner regions of protoplanetary "transition" disks. In this work, we directly test this hypothesis in the context of current models of grain growth and transport. Methods: A set of dust evolution models with different disk shapes, masses, turbulence parameters, and drift efficiencies is combined with radiative transfer calculations in order to derive theoretical spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and images. Results: We find that grain growth and transport effects can indeed produce dips in the infrared SED, as typically found in observations of transition disks. Our models achieve the necessary reduction of mass in small dust by producing larger grains, yet not large enough to be fragmenting efficiently. However, this population of large grains is still detectable at millimeter wavelengths. Even if perfect sticking is assumed and radial drift is neglected, a large population of dust grains is left behind because the time scales on which they are swept up by the larger grains are too long. This mechanism thus fails to reproduce the large emission cavities observed in recent millimeter-wave interferometric images of accreting transition disks.
  • We present nebular phase optical imaging and spectroscopy and near/mid-IR imaging of the Type II SN 2006bc. Observations reveal the central wavelength of the symmetric H$\alpha$ line profile to be red-shifted with respect to the host galaxy H$\alpha$ emission by day 325. Such an phenomenon has been argued to result from an asymmetric explosion in the iron-peak elements resulting in a larger mass of $^{56}$Ni and higher excitation of hydrogen on the far side of the SN explosion. We also observe a gradual blue-shifting of this H$\alpha$ peak which is indicative of dust formation in the ejecta. Although showing a normal peak brightness, V $\sim$ -17.2, for a core-collapse SN, 2006bc fades by $\sim$6 mag during the first 400 days suggesting either a relatively low $^{56}$Ni yield, an increase in extinction due to new dust, or both. A short duration flattening of the light curve is observed from day 416 to day 541 suggesting an optical light echo. Based on the narrow time window of this echo, we discuss implications on the location and geometry of the reflecting ISM. With our radiative transfer models, we find an upper limit of 2 x 10$^{-3}$ M$_{\odot}$ of dust around SN 2006bc. In the event that all of this dust were formed during the SN explosion, this quantity of dust is still several orders of magnitude lower than that needed to explain the large quantities of dust observed in the early universe.
  • We present an SPH parameter study of the dynamical effect of photoionization from O--type stars on star--forming clouds of a range of masses and sizes during the time window before supernovae explode. Our model clouds all have the same degree of turbulent support initially, the ratio of turbulent kinetic energy to gravitational potential energy being set to $E_{\rm kin}/|E_{\rm pot}|$=0.7. We allow the clouds to form stars and study the dynamical effects of the ionizing radiation from the massive stars or clusters born within them. We find that dense filamentary structures and accretion flows limit the quantities of gas that can be ionized, particularly in the higher density clusters. More importantly, the higher escape velocities in our more massive (10$^{6}$M$_{\odot}$) clouds prevent the HII regions from sweeping up and expelling significant quantities of gas, so that the most massive clouds are largely dynamically unaffected by ionizing feedback. However, feedback has a profound effect on the lower--density 10$^{4}$ and 10$^{5}$M$_{\odot}$ clouds in our study, creating vast evacuated bubbles and expelling tens of percent of the neutral gas in the 3Myr timescale before the first supernovae are expected to detonate, resulting in clouds highly porous to both photons and supernova ejecta.
  • Context: The global size and spatial distribution of dust is an important ingredient in the structure and evolution of protoplanetary disks and in the formation of larger bodies, such as planetesimals. Aims: We aim to derive simple equations that explain the global evolution of the dust surface density profile and the upper limit of the grain size distribution and which can readily be used for further modeling or for interpreting of observational data. Methods: We have developed a simple model that follows the upper end of the dust size distribution and the evolution of the dust surface density profile. This model is calibrated with state-of-the-art simulations of dust evolution, which treat dust growth, fragmentation, and transport in viscously evolving gas disks. Results: We find very good agreement between the full dust-evolution code and the toy model presented in this paper. We derive analytical profiles that describe the dust-to-gas ratios and the dust surface density profiles well in protoplanetary disks, as well as the radial flux by solid material "rain out", which is crucial for triggering any gravity assisted formation of planetesimals. We show that fragmentation is the dominating effect in the inner regions of the disk leading to a dust surface density exponent of -1.5, while the outer regions at later times can become drift-dominated, yielding a dust surface density exponent of -0.75. Our results show that radial drift is not efficient in fragmenting dust grains. This supports the theory that small dust grains are resupplied by fragmentation due to the turbulent state of the disk.
  • Constraining the spatial and thermal structure of the gaseous component of circumstellar disks is crucial to understand star and planet formation. Models predict that the [Ne II] line at 12.81 {\mu}m detected in young stellar objects with Spitzer traces disk gas and its response to high energy radiation, but such [Ne II] emission may also originate in shocks within powerful outflows. To distinguish between these potential origins for mid-infrared [Ne II] emission and to constrain disk models, we observed 32 young stellar objects using the high resolution (R~30000) mid-infrared spectrograph VISIR at the VLT. We detected the 12.81 {\mu}m [Ne II] line in 12 objects, tripling the number of detections of this line in young stellar objects with high spatial and spectral resolution spectrographs. We obtain the following main results: a) In Class I objects the [Ne II] emission observed from Spitzer is mainly due to gas at a distance of more than 20-40 AU from the star, where neon is, most likely, ionized by shocks due to protostellar outflows. b) In transition and pre-transition disks, most of the emission is confined to the inner disk, within 20-40 AU from the central star. c) Detailed analysis of line profiles indicates that, in transition and pre-transition disks, the line is slightly blue-shifted (2-12 km s{^-1}) with respect to the stellar velocity, and the line width is directly correlated with the disk inclination, as expected if the emission is due to a disk wind. d) Models of EUV/X-ray irradiated disks reproduce well the observed relation between the line width and the disk inclination, but underestimate the blue-shift of the line.
  • We present a multi-wavelength study of three star forming regions, spanning the age range 1-14 Myr, located between the 30 Doradus complex and supernova SN1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We reliably identify about 1000 pre-main sequence (PMS) star candidates actively undergoing mass accretion and estimate their stellar properties and mass accretion rate (Macc). Our measurements represent the largest Macc dataset of low-metallicity stars presented so far. As such, they offer a unique opportunity to study on a statistical basis the mass accretion process in the LMC and, more in general, the evolution of the mass accretion process around low-metallicity stars. We find that the typical \dot{M} of PMS stars in the LMC is higher than for galactic PMS stars of the same mass, independently of their age. Taking into account the caveats of isochronal age and \dot{M} estimates, the difference in Macc between the LMC and our Galaxy appears to be about an order of magnitude. We review the main mechanisms of disk dispersal and find indications that typically higher Macc are to be expected in low-metallicity environments. However, many issues of this scenario need to be clarified by future observations and modeling. We also find that, in the mass range 1-2 M_sun, the Macc of PMS stars in the LMC increases with stellar mass as \dot{M}acc\proptoM^b, with b \approx1, i.e. slower than the second power low found for galactic PMS stars in the same mass regime.
  • We present an analysis of multi-epoch observations of the Type II-P supernova SN 2004et. New and archival optical spectra of SN 2004et are used to study the evolution of the Halpha and [O I] 6300A line profiles between days 259 and 646. Mid-infrared imaging was carried out between 2004 to 2010. We include Spitzer `warm' mission photometry at 3.6 and 4.5um obtained on days 1779, 1931 and 2151, along with ground-based and HST optical and near-infrared observations obtained between days 79 and 1803. Multi-wavelength light curves are presented, as well as optical-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for multiple epochs. Starting from about day 300, the optical light curves provide evidence for an increasing amount of circumstellar extinction attributable to newly formed dust, with the additional extinction reaching 0.8-1.5 magnitudes in the V-band by day 690. The overall SEDs were fitted with multiple blackbody components, in order to investigate the luminosity evolution of the supernova, and then with Monte Carlo radiative transfer models using smooth or clumpy dust distributions, in order to estimate how much new dust condensed in the ejecta. The luminosity evolution was consistent with the decay of 56Co in the ejecta up until about day 690, after which an additional emission source is required, in agreement with the findings of Kotak et al. (2009). Clumped dust density distributions consisting of 20% amorphous carbons and 80% silicates by mass were able to match the observed optical and infrared SEDs, with dust masses that increased from 8x10^{-5} Msun on day 300 to 1.5x10^{-3} Msun on day 690, still significantly lower than the values needed for core collapse supernovae to make a significant contribution to the dust enrichment of galaxies.
  • The extraction of chemical abundances of ionised nebulae from a limited spectral range is usually hampered by the lack of emission lines corresponding to certain ionic stages. So far, the missing emission lines have been accounted for by the ionisation correction factors (ICFs), constructed under simplistic assumptions like spherical geometry by using 1-D photoionisation modelling. In this contribution we discuss the results (Goncalves et al. 2011, in prep.) of our ongoing project to find a new set of ICFs to determine total abundances of N, O, Ne, Ar, and S, with optical spectra, in the case of non-spherical PNe. These results are based on a grid of 3-D photoionisation modelling of round, elliptical and bipolar shaped PNe, spanning the typical PN luminosities, effective temperatures and densities. We show that the additional corrections --to the widely used Kingsburgh and Barlow (1994) ICFs-- are always higher for bipolars than for ellipticals. Moreover, these additional corrections are, for bipolars, up to: 17% for oxygen, 33% for nitrogen, 40% for neon, 28% for argon and 50% for sulphur. Finally, on top of the fact that corrections change greatly with shape, they vary also greatly with the central star temperature, while the luminosity is a less important parameter.