• We present an X-ray point-source catalog from the XMM-Large Scale Structure survey region (XMM-LSS), one of the XMM-Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (XMM-SERVS) fields. We target the XMM-LSS region with $1.3$ Ms of new XMM-Newton AO-15 observations, transforming the archival X-ray coverage in this region into a 5.3 deg$^2$ contiguous field with uniform X-ray coverage totaling $2.7$ Ms of flare-filtered exposure, with a $46$ ks median PN exposure time. We provide an X-ray catalog of 5242 sources detected in the soft (0.5-2 keV), hard (2-10 keV), and/or full (0.5-10 keV) bands with a 1% expected spurious fraction determined from simulations. A total of 2381 new X-ray sources are detected compared to previous source catalogs in the same area. Our survey has flux limits of $1.7\times10^{-15}$, $1.3\times10^{-14}$, and $6.5\times10^{-15}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ over 90% of its area in the soft, hard, and full bands, respectively, which is comparable to those of the XMM-COSMOS survey. We identify multiwavelength counterpart candidates for 99.9% of the X-ray sources, of which 93% are considered as reliable based on their matching likelihood ratios. The reliabilities of these high-likelihood-ratio counterparts are further confirmed to be $\approx 97$% reliable based on deep Chandra coverage over $\approx 5$% of the XMM-LSS region. Results of multiwavelength identifications are also included in the source catalog, along with basic optical-to-infrared photometry and spectroscopic redshifts from publicly available surveys. We compute photometric redshifts for X-ray sources in 4.5 deg$^2$ of our field where forced-aperture multi-band photometry is available; $>70$% of the X-ray sources in this subfield have either spectroscopic or high-quality photometric redshifts.
  • The dense environment of galaxy clusters strongly influences the nature of galaxies. Here, we study the cause of the size distribution of a sample of 560 spectroscopic members spanning a wide dynamical range down to 10^8.5 M_sol (log(M)-2) in the massive CLASH cluster MACSJ 1206.2-0847 at z~0.44. We use Subaru SuprimeCam imaging covering the highest-density core out to the infall regions (3 virial radii) to look for cluster-specific effects. We also compare our measurements to a compatible large field study in order to span extreme environmental densities. This paper presents the trends we identified for cluster galaxies divided by their colors into star-forming and quiescent galaxies and into distinct morphological types (using S\'ersic index and bulge/disk decompositions). We observed larger sizes for early type and smaller sizes for massive late type galaxies in clusters in comparison to the field. We attribute this to longer quenching timescales of more massive galaxies in the cluster. Our analysis further revealed an increasing importance of recently quenched transition objects ("red disks"). This is a virialized population found at higher cluster-centric radii with sizes similar to the quiescent, spheroid-dominated population of the cluster center, but with disks still in-tact. The mass-size relation of cluster galaxies may therefore be understood as the consequence of a mix of progenitors formed at different quenching epochs. We also find that galaxy sizes smoothly decreasing as a function of bulge fraction. At same bulge-to-total ratio and same stellar mass, quiescent galaxies are smaller than star-forming galaxies. This is likely because of a fading of the outskirts of the disk, which we saw in comparing sizes of their disk-components. Ram-pressure stripping of the cold gas and other forms of more gradual gas starvation are likely responsible for this observation.
  • The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey is one of the largest contemporary spectroscopic surveys of low-redshift galaxies. Covering an area of ~286 deg^2 (split among five survey regions) down to a limiting magnitude of r < 19.8 mag, we have collected spectra and reliable redshifts for 238,000 objects using the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. In addition, we have assembled imaging data from a number of independent surveys in order to generate photometry spanning the wavelength range 1 nm - 1 m. Here we report on the recently completed spectroscopic survey and present a series of diagnostics to assess its final state and the quality of the redshift data. We also describe a number of survey aspects and procedures, or updates thereof, including changes to the input catalogue, redshifting and re-redshifting, and the derivation of ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared photometry. Finally, we present the second public release of GAMA data. In this release we provide input catalogue and targeting information, spectra, redshifts, ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared photometry, single-component S\'ersic fits, stellar masses, H$\alpha$-derived star formation rates, environment information, and group properties for all galaxies with r < 19.0 mag in two of our survey regions, and for all galaxies with r < 19.4 mag in a third region (72,225 objects in total). The database serving these data is available at http://www.gama-survey.org/.
  • We present the results of a search for bright (-22.7 < M_UV < -20.5) Lyman-break galaxies at z ~ 6 within a total of 1.65 square degrees of imaging in the UltraVISTA/COSMOS and UKIDSS UDS/SXDS fields. The deep near-infrared imaging available in the two independent fields, in addition to deep optical (including z'-band) data, enables the sample of z ~ 6 star-forming galaxies to be securely detected long-ward of the break (in contrast to several previous studies). We show that the expected contamination rate of our initial sample by cool galactic brown dwarfs is < 3 per cent and demonstrate that they can be effectively removed by fitting brown dwarf spectral templates to the photometry. At z ~ 6 the galaxy surface density in the UltraVISTA field exceeds that in the UDS by a factor of ~ 1.8, indicating strong cosmic variance even between degree-scale fields at z > 5. We calculate the bright end of the rest-frame Ultra-Violet (UV) luminosity function (LF) at z ~ 6. The galaxy number counts are a factor of ~1.7 lower than predicted by the recent LF determination by Bouwens et al.. In comparison to other smaller area studies, we find an evolution in the characteristic magnitude between z ~ 5 and z ~ 7 of dM* ~ 0.4 mag, and show that a double power-law or a Schechter function can equally well describe the LF at z = 6. Furthermore, the bright-end of the LF appears to steepen from z ~ 7 to z ~ 5, which could indicate the onset of mass quenching or the rise of dust obscuration, a conclusion supported by comparing the observed LFs to a range of theoretical model predictions.
  • Aims. This work investigates the potential of using the wavelength-dependence of galaxy structural parameters (S\'ersic index, n, and effective radius, Re) to separate galaxies into distinct types. Methods. A sample of nearby galaxies with reliable visual morphologies is considered, for which we measure structural parameters by fitting multi-wavelength single-S\'ersic models. Additionally, we use a set of artificially redshifted galaxies to test how these classifiers behave when the signal-to-noise decreases. Results. We show that the wavelength-dependence of n may be employed to separate visually-classified early- and late-type galaxies, in a manner similar to the use of colour and n. Furthermore, we find that the wavelength variation of n can recover galaxies that are misclassified by these other morphological proxies. Roughly half of the spiral galaxies that contaminate an early-type sample selected using (u-r) versus n can be correctly identified as late-types by N, the ratio of n measured in two different bands. Using a set of artificially-redshifted images, we show that this technique remains effective up to z ~ 0.1. N can therefore be used to achieve purer samples of early-types and more complete samples of late-types than using a colour-n cut alone. We also study the suitability of R, the ratio of Re in two different bands, as a morphological classifier, but find that the average sizes of both early- and late-type galaxies do not change substantially over optical wavelengths.
  • Aims. In this work, we present an extended study of the dust environment of a sample of short period comets and their dynamical history. With this aim, we characterized the dust tails when the comets are active, and we made a statistical study to determine their dynamical evolution. The targets selected were 22P/Kopff, 30P/Reinmuth 1, 78P/Gehrels 2, 115P/Maury, 118P/Shoemaker-Levy 4, 123P/West-Hartley, 157P/Tritton, 185/Petriew, and P/2011 W2 (Rinner). Methods. We use two different observational data: a set of images taken at the Observatorio de Sierra Nevada and the Afrho curves provided by the amateur astronomical association Cometas-Obs. To model these observations, we use our Monte Carlo dust tail code. From this analysis, we derive the dust parameters, which best describe the dust environment: dust loss rates, ejection velocities, and size distribution of particles. On the other hand, we use a numerical integrator to study the dynamical history of the comets, which allows us to determine with a 90% of confidence level the time spent by these objects in the region of Jupiter Family Comets. Results. From the Monte Carlo dust tail code, we derived three categories attending to the amount of dust emitted: Weakly active (115P, 157P, and Rinner), moderately active (30P, 123P, and 185P), and highly active (22P, 78P, and 118P). The dynamical studies showed that the comets of this sample are young in the Jupiter Family region, where the youngest ones are 22P (100 yr), 78P (500 yr), and 118P (600 yr). The study points to a certain correlation between comet activity and time spent in the Jupiter Family region, although this trend is not always fulfilled. The largest particle sizes are not tightly constrained, so that the total dust mass derived should be regarded as lower limits.}
  • We present two large, nearby (0.013$\le$z$\le$0.06) samples of Early-Type Galaxies (ETGs): a visually classified sample of 220 ETGs, created using source-matched data from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) database with FIR/sub-mm detections from $Herschel$-ATLAS; and a visually classified sample of 551 ETGs which are undetected with $Herschel$-ATLAS. Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are removed from our samples using optical emission line diagnostics. These samples are scrutinised to determine characteristics of sub-mm detected versus undetected ETGs. We find similarities in the stellar mass distributions of the two ETG samples but testing other properties uncovers significant differences. The sub-mm detected sample is shown to have lower concentration and S\'ersic indices than those in the undetected sample - a result which may be linked to the presence of dust in the former. Optical and UV-optical colours are also shown to be much bluer, indicating that the dust is linked with recent star formation. The intrinsic effective radii are on average 1.5 times larger for the sub-mm detected ETGs. Surface densities and groups data from the GAMA database are examined for the two samples, leading to the conclusion that dusty ETGs inhabit sparser environments than non-dusty ETGs in the nearby universe, although environments of the brightest ETGs are shown to differ the least. Modified Planck functions are fit to the H-ATLAS detected PACS and SPIRE fluxes for ETGs with sub-mm flux densities of at least 3$\sigma$ in the 350$\mu$m SPIRE band, giving a resultant mean cold dust temperature of T$_{d}$=22.1K, with a range of 9-30K. The corresponding mean dust mass is 1.8$\times10^{7}$M$_{\odot}$, with a range of (0.08-35.0)$\times10^{7}$M$_{\odot}$. The dust masses calculated from these fits, normalised by stellar mass, are shown to increase with decreasing stellar mass and bluer colours.
  • We discuss the structural and morphological properties of galaxies in a z=1.62 proto-cluster using near-IR imaging data from Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 data of the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS). The cluster galaxies exhibit a clear color-morphology relation: galaxies with colors of quiescent stellar populations generally have morphologies consistent with spheroids, and galaxies with colors consistent with ongoing star formation have disk-like and irregular morphologies. The size distribution of the quiescent cluster galaxies shows a deficit of compact (< 1kpc), massive galaxies compared to CANDELS field galaxies at z=1.6. As a result the cluster quiescent galaxies have larger average effective sizes compared to field galaxies at fixed mass at greater than 90% significance. Combined with data from the literature, the size evolution of quiescent cluster galaxies is relatively slow from z~1.6 to the present, growing as (1+z)^(-0.6+/-0.1). If this result is generalizable, then it implies that physical processes associated with the denser cluster region seems to have caused accelerated size growth in quiescent galaxies prior to z=1.6 and slower subsequent growth at z<1.6 compared to galaxies in the lower density field. The quiescent cluster galaxies at z=1.6 have higher ellipticities compared to lower redshift samples at fixed mass, and their surface-brightness profiles suggest that they contain extended stellar disks. We argue the cluster galaxies require dissipationless (i.e., gas-poor or "dry") mergers to reorganize the disk material and to match the relations for ellipticity, stellar mass, size, and color of early-type galaxies in z<1 clusters.
  • We present weak lensing data from the HST/STAGES survey to study the three-dimensional spatial distribution of matter and galaxies in the Abell 901/902 supercluster complex. Our method improves over the existing 3D lensing mapping techniques by calibrating and removing redshift bias and accounting for the effects of the radial elongation of 3D structures. We also include the first detailed noise analysis of a 3D lensing map, showing that even with deep HST quality data, only the most massive structures, for example M200>~10^15 Msun/h at z~0.8, can be resolved in 3D with any reasonable redshift accuracy (\Delta z~0.15). We compare the lensing map to the stellar mass distribution and find luminous counterparts for all mass peaks detected with a peak significance >3\sigma. We see structures in and behind the z=0.165 foreground supercluster, finding structure directly behind the A901b cluster at z~0.6 and also behind the SW group at z~0.7. This 3D structure viewed in projection has no significant impact on recent mass estimates of A901b or the SW group components SWa and SWb.