• Disks in binary systems can cause exotic eclipsing events. MWC 882 (BD-22 4376, EPIC 225300403) is such a disk-eclipsing system identified from observations during Campaign 11 of the K2 mission. We propose that MWC 882 is a post-Algol system with a B7 donor star of mass $0.542\pm0.053\,M_\odot$ in a 72 day period orbit around an A0 accreting star of mass $3.24\pm0.29\,M_\odot$. The $59.9\pm6.2\,R_\odot$ disk around the accreting star occults the donor star once every orbit, inducing 19 day long, 7% deep eclipses identified by K2, and subsequently found in pre-discovery ASAS and ASAS-SN observations. We coordinated a campaign of photometric and spectroscopic observations for MWC 882 to measure the dynamical masses of the components and to monitor the system during eclipse. We found the photometric eclipse to be gray to $\approx 1$%. We found the primary star exhibits spectroscopic signatures of active accretion, and observed gas absorption features from the disk during eclipse. We suggest MWC 882 initially consisted of a $\approx 3.6\,M_\odot$ donor star transferring mass via Roche lobe overflow to a $\approx 2.1\,M_\odot$ accretor in a $\approx 7$ day initial orbit. Through angular momentum conservation, the donor star is pushed outward during mass transfer to its current orbit of 72 days. The observed state of the system corresponds with the donor star having left the Red Giant Branch ~0.3 Myr ago, terminating active mass transfer. The present disk is expected to be short-lived ($10^2$ years) without an active feeding mechanism, presenting a challenge to this model.
  • We present six galaxies at z~2 that show evidence of Lyman continuum (LyC) emission based on the newly acquired UV imaging of the Hubble Deep UV legacy survey (HDUV) conducted with the WFC3/UVIS camera on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). At the redshift of these sources, the HDUV F275W images partially probe the ionizing continuum. By exploiting the HST multi-wavelength data available in the HDUV/GOODS fields, models of the UV spectral energy distributions, and detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the intergalactic medium absorption, we estimate the absolute ionizing photon escape fractions of these galaxies to be very high -- typically >60% (>13% for all sources at 90% likelihood). Our findings are in broad agreement with previous studies that found only a small fraction of galaxies to show high escape fraction. These six galaxies comprise the largest sample yet of LyC leaking candidates at z~2 whose inferred LyC flux has been cleanly observed at HST resolution. While three of our six candidates show evidence of hosting an active galactic nucleus (AGN), two of these are heavily obscured and their LyC emission appears to originate from star-forming regions rather than the central nucleus. This suggests an AGN-aided pathway for LyC escape from these sources. Extensive multi-wavelength data in the GOODS fields, especially the near-IR grism spectra from the 3D-HST survey, enable us to study the candidates in detail and tentatively test some recently proposed indirect methods to probe LyC leakage -- namely, the [OIII]/[OII] line ratio and the H$\beta-$UV slope diagram. High-resolution spectroscopic followup of our candidates will help constrain such indirect methods which are our only hope of studying $f_{esc}$ at z~5-9 in the fast-approaching era of the James Webb Space Telescope.
  • We identify 4 unusually bright (H < 25.5) galaxies from HST and Spitzer CANDELS data with probable redshifts z ~ 7-9. These identifications include the brightest-known galaxies to date at z > 7.5. As Y-band observations are not available over the full CANDELS program to perform a standard Lyman-break selection of z > 7 galaxies, we employ an alternate strategy using deep Spitzer/IRAC data. We identify z ~ 7.1 - 9.1 galaxies by selecting z >~ 6 galaxies from the HST CANDELS data that show quite red IRAC [3.6]-[4.5] colors, indicating strong [OIII]+Hbeta lines in the 4.5 micron band. This selection strategy was validated using a modest sample for which we have deep Y-band coverage, and subsequently used to select the brightest z > 7 sources. Applying the IRAC criteria to all HST-selected optical-dropout galaxies over the full ~900 arcmin**2 of the CANDELS survey revealed four unusually bright z ~ 7.1, 7.6, 7.9 and 8.6 candidates. The median [3.6]-[4.5] color of our selected z ~ 7.1-9.1 sample is consistent with rest-frame [OIII]+Hbeta EWs of ~1500A, in the [4.5] band. Keck/MOSFIRE spectroscopy has been independently reported for two of our selected sources, showing Ly-alpha at redshifts of 7.7302+/-0.0006 and 8.683^+0.001_-0.004, respectively. We present similar Keck/MOSFIRE spectroscopy for a third selected galaxy with a probable 4.7sigma Ly-alpha line at z_spec=7.4770+/-0.0008. All three have H-band magnitudes of ~25 mag and are ~0.5 mag more luminous (M(UV) ~ -22.0) than any previously discovered z ~ 8 galaxy, with important implications for the UV LF. Our 3 brightest, highest redshift z > 7 galaxies all lie within the CANDELS EGS field, providing a dramatic illustration of the potential impact of field-to-field variance.
  • We present Hubble WFC3/IR slitless grism spectra of a remarkably bright $z\gtrsim10$ galaxy candidate, GN-z11, identified initially from CANDELS/GOODS-N imaging data. A significant spectroscopic continuum break is detected at $\lambda=1.47\pm0.01~\mu$m. The new grism data, combined with the photometric data, rule out all plausible lower redshift solutions for this source. The only viable solution is that this continuum break is the Ly$\alpha$ break redshifted to ${z_\mathrm{grism}=11.09^{+0.08}_{-0.12}}$, just $\sim$400 Myr after the Big Bang. This observation extends the current spectroscopic frontier by 150 Myr to well before the Planck (instantaneous) cosmic reionization peak at z~8.8, demonstrating that galaxy build-up was well underway early in the reionization epoch at z>10. GN-z11 is remarkably and unexpectedly luminous for a galaxy at such an early time: its UV luminosity is 3x larger than L* measured at z~6-8. The Spitzer IRAC detections up to 4.5 $\mu$m of this galaxy are consistent with a stellar mass of ${\sim10^{9}~M_\odot}$. This spectroscopic redshift measurement suggests that the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to similarly and easily confirm such sources at z>10 and characterize their physical properties through detailed spectroscopy. Furthermore, WFIRST, with its wide-field near-IR imaging, would find large numbers of similar galaxies and contribute greatly to JWST's spectroscopy, if it is launched early enough to overlap with JWST.
  • The IRAC ultradeep field (IUDF) and IRAC Legacy over GOODS (IGOODS) programs are two ultradeep imaging surveys at 3.6{\mu}m and 4.5{\mu}m with the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). The primary aim is to directly detect the infrared light of reionization epoch galaxies at z > 7 and to constrain their stellar populations. The observations cover the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), including the two HUDF parallel fields, and the CANDELS/GOODS-South, and are combined with archival data from all previous deep programs into one ultradeep dataset. The resulting imaging reaches unprecedented coverage in IRAC 3.6{\mu}m and 4.5{\mu}m ranging from > 50 hour over 150 arcmin^2, > 100 hour over 60 sq arcmin2, to 200 hour over 5 - 10 arcmin$^2$. This paper presents the survey description, data reduction, and public release of reduced mosaics on the same astrometric system as the CANDELS/GOODS-South WFC3 data. To facilitate prior-based WFC3+IRAC photometry, we introduce a new method to create high signal-to-noise PSFs from the IRAC data and reconstruct the complex spatial variation due to survey geometry. The PSF maps are included in the release, as are registered maps of subsets of the data to enable reliability and variability studies. Simulations show that the noise in the ultradeep IRAC images decreases approximately as the square root of integration time over the range 20 - 200 hours, well below the classical confusion limit, reaching 1{\sigma} point source sensitivities as faint as of 15 nJy (28.5 AB) at 3.6{\mu}m and 18 nJy (28.3 AB) at 4.5{\mu}m. The value of such ultradeep IRAC data is illustrated by direct detections of z = 7 - 8 galaxies as faint as HAB = 28.
  • We study the environmental dependence of stellar population properties at z ~ 1.3. We derive galaxy properties (stellar masses, ages and star formation histories) for samples of massive, red, passive early-type galaxies in two high-redshift clusters, RXJ0849+4452 and RXJ0848+4453 (with redshifts of z = 1.26 and 1.27, respectively), and compare them with those measured for the RDCS1252.9-2927 cluster at z=1.24 and with those measured for a similarly mass-selected sample of field contemporaries drawn from the GOODS-South Field. Robust estimates of the aforementioned parameters have been obtained by comparing a large grid of composite stellar population models with extensive 8-10 band photometric coverage, from the rest-frame far-ultraviolet to the infrared. We find no variations of the overall stellar population properties among the different samples of cluster early-type galaxies. However, when comparing cluster versus field stellar population properties we find that, even if the (star formation weighted) ages are similar and depend only on galaxy mass, the ones in the field do employ longer timescales to assemble their final mass. We find that, approximately 1 Gyr after the onset of star formation, the majority (75%) of cluster galaxies have already assembled most (> 80%) of their final mass, while, by the same time, fewer (35%) field ETGs have. Thus we conclude that while galaxy mass regulates the timing of galaxy formation, the environment regulates the timescale of their star formation histories.
  • We present extensive early photometric (ultraviolet through near-infrared) and spectroscopic (optical and near-infrared) data on supernova (SN) 2008D as well as X-ray data analysis on the associated Swift/X-ray transient (XRT) 080109. Our data span a time range of 5 hours before the detection of the X-ray transient to 150 days after its detection, and detailed analysis allowed us to derive constraints on the nature of the SN and its progenitor; throughout we draw comparisons with results presented in the literature and find several key aspects that differ. We show that the X-ray spectrum of XRT 080109 can be fit equally well by an absorbed power law or a superposition of about equal parts of both power law and blackbody. Our data first established that SN 2008D is a spectroscopically normal SN Ib (i.e., showing conspicuous He lines), and show that SN 2008D had a relatively long rise time of 18 days and a modest optical peak luminosity. The early-time light curves of the SN are dominated by a cooling stellar envelope (for \Delta t~0.1- 4 day, most pronounced in the blue bands) followed by 56^Ni decay. We construct a reliable measurement of the bolometric output for this stripped-envelope SN, and, combined with estimates of E_K and M_ej from the literature, estimate the stellar radius R_star of its probable Wolf-Rayet progenitor. According to the model of Waxman et al. and of Chevalier & Fransson, we derive R_star^{W07}= 1.2+/-0.7 R_sun and R_star^{CF08}= 12+/-7 R_sun, respectively; the latter being more in line with typical WN stars. Spectra obtained at 3 and 4 months after maximum light show double-peaked oxygen lines that we associate with departures from spherical symmetry, as has been suggested for the inner ejecta of a number of SN Ib cores.
  • (Abridged) We report on the environmental dependence of properties of galaxies around the RDCSJ0910+54 cluster at z=1.1. We have obtained multi-band wide-field images of the cluster with Suprime-Cam and MOIRCS on Subaru and WFCAM on UKIRT. Also, an intensive spectroscopic campaign has been carried out using LRIS on Keck and FOCAS on Subaru. We discover a possible large-scale structure around the cluster in the form of three clumps of galaxies. This is potentially one of the largest structures found so far in the z>1 Universe. We then examine stellar populations of galaxies in the structure. Red galaxies have already become the dominant population in the cores of rich clusters at z~1, and the fraction of red galaxies has not strongly changed since then. The red fraction depends on richness of clusters in the sense that it is higher in rich clusters than in poor groups. The luminosity function of red galaxies in rich clusters is consistent with that in local clusters. On the other hand, luminosity function of red galaxies in poor groups shows a deficit of faint red galaxies. This confirms our earlier findings that galaxies follow an environment-dependent down-sizing evolution. There seems to be a large variation in the evolutionary phases of galaxies in groups with similar masses. Further studies of high-z clusters will be a promising way of addressing the role of nature and nurture effects on galaxy evolution.
  • We derive the rest-frame $K$-band luminosity function for galaxies in 32 clusters at $0.6 < z < 1.3$ using deep $3.6\mu$m and $4.5\mu$m imaging from the Spitzer Space Telescope InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC). The luminosity functions approximate the stellar mass function of the cluster galaxies. Their dependence on redshift indicates that massive cluster galaxies (to the characteristic luminosity $M^*_K$) are fully assembled at least at $z \sim 1.3$ and that little significant accretion takes place at later times. The existence of massive, highly evolved galaxies at these epochs is likely to represent a significant challenge to theories of hierarchical structure formation where such objects are formed by the late accretion of spheroidal systems at $z < 1$.
  • (Abridged) We present a HST/ACS weak-lensing study of RX J0849+4452 and RX J0848+4453, the two most distant (at z=1.26 and z=1.27, respectively) clusters yet measured with weak-lensing. The two clusters are separated by ~4' from each other and appear to form a supercluster in the Lynx field. Using our deep ACS F775W and F850LP imaging, we detected weak-lensing signals around both clusters at ~4 sigma levels. The mass distribution indicated by the reconstruction map is in good spatial agreement with the cluster galaxies. From the SIS fitting, we determined that RX J0849+4452 and RX J0848+4453 have similar projected masses of ~2.0x10^14 solar mass and ~2.1x10^14 solar mass, respectively, within a 0.5 Mpc (~60") aperture radius.
  • A five square arcminute region around the luminous radio-loud quasar SDSS J0836+0054 (z=5.8) hosts a wealth of associated galaxies, characterized by very red (1.3 < i_775 - z_{850} < 2.0) color. The surface density of these z~5.8 candidates is approximately six times higher than the number expected from deep ACS fields. This is one of the highest galaxy overdensities at high redshifts, which may develop into a group or cluster. We also find evidence for a substructure associated with one of the candidates. It has two very faint companion objects within two arcseconds, which are likely to merge. The finding supports the results of a recent simulation that luminous quasars at high redshifts lie on the most prominent dark-matter filaments and are surrounded by many fainter galaxies. The quasar activity from these regions may signal the buildup of a massive system.
  • This is a report of Chandra, XMM-Newton, HST and ARC observations of an extended X-ray source at z = 0.59. The apparent member galaxies range from spiral to elliptical and are all relatively red (i'-Ks about 3). We interpret this object to be a fossil group based on the difference between the brightness of the first and second brightest cluster members in the i'-band, and because the rest-frame bolometric X-ray luminosity is about 9.2x10^43 h70^-2 erg s^-1. This makes Cl 1205+44 the highest redshift fossil group yet reported. The system also contains a central double-lobed radio galaxy which appears to be growing via the accretion of smaller galaxies. We discuss the formation and evolution of fossil groups in light of the high redshift of Cl 1205+44.
  • We study the dynamical origin of the structures observed in the scattered-light images of the resolved debris disk around HD 141569A. We explore the roles of radiation pressure from the central star, gas drag from the gas disk, and the tidal forces from two nearby stars in creating and maintaining these structures. We use a simple one-dimensional axisymmetric model to show that the presence of the gas helps confine the dust and that a broad ring of dust is produced if a central hole exists in the disk. This model also suggests that the disk is in a transient, excited dynamical state, as the observed dust creation rate applied over the age of the star is inconsistent with submillimeter mass measurements. We model in two dimensions the effects of a fly-by encounter between the disk and a binary star in a prograde, parabolic, coplanar orbit. We track the spatial distribution of the disk's gas, planetesimals, and dust. We conclude that the surface density distribution reflects the planetesimal distribution for a wide range of parameters. Our most viable model features a disk of initial radius 400 AU, a gas mass of 50 M_earth, and beta = 4 and suggests that the system is being observed within 4000 yr of the fly-by periastron. The model reproduces some features of HD 141569A's disk, such as a broad single ring and large spiral arms, but it does not reproduce the observed multiple spiral rings or disk asymmetries nor the observed clearing in the inner disk. For the latter, we consider the effect of a 5 M_Jup planet in an eccentric orbit on the planetesimal distribution of HD 141569A.
  • We measure the morphology--density relation (MDR) and morphology-radius relation (MRR) for galaxies in seven z ~ 1 clusters that have been observed with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope. Simulations and independent comparisons of ourvisually derived morphologies indicate that ACS allows one to distinguish between E, S0, and spiral morphologies down to zmag = 24, corresponding to L/L* = 0.21 and 0.30 at z = 0.83 and z = 1.24, respectively. We adopt density and radius estimation methods that match those used at lower redshift in order to study the evolution of the MDR and MRR. We detect a change in the MDR between 0.8 < z < 1.2 and that observed at z ~ 0, consistent with recent work -- specifically, the growth in the bulge-dominated galaxy fraction, f_E+SO, with increasing density proceeds less rapidly at z ~ 1 than it does at z ~ 0. At z ~ 1 and density <= 500 galaxies/Mpc^2, we find <f_E+S0> = 0.72 +/- 0.10. At z ~ 0, an E+S0 population fraction of this magnitude occurs at densities about 5 times smaller. The evolution in the MDR is confined to densities >= 40 galaxies/Mpc^2 and appears to be primarily due to a deficit of S0 galaxies and an excess of Spiral+Irr galaxies relative to the local galaxy population. The Elliptical fraction - density relation exhibits no significant evolution between z = 1 and z = 0. We find mild evidence to suggest that the MDR is dependent on the bolometric X-ray luminosity of the intracluster medium. Implications for the evolution of the disk galaxy population in dense regions are discussed in the context of these observations.
  • We present new measurements of the galaxy luminosity function (LF) and its dependence on local galaxy density, color, morphology, and clustocentric radius for the massive z=0.83 cluster MS1054-0321. Our analyses are based on imaging performed with the ACS onboard the HST in the F606W, F775W and F850LP passbands and extensive spectroscopic data obtained with the Keck LRIS. Our main results are based on a spectroscopically selected sample of 143 cluster members with morphological classifications derived from the ACS observations. Our three primary findings are (1) the faint-end slope of the LF is steepest in the bluest filter, (2) the LF in the inner part of the cluster (or highest density regions) has a flatter faint-end slope, and (3) the fraction of early-type galaxies is higher at the bright end of the LF, and gradually decreases toward fainter magnitudes. These characteristics are consistent with those in local galaxy clusters, indicating that, at least in massive clusters, the common characteristics of cluster LFs are established at z=0.83. We also find a 2sigma deficit of intrinsically faint, red galaxies (i-z>0.5, Mi>-19) in this cluster. This trend may suggest that faint, red galaxies (which are common in z<0.1 rich clusters) have not yet been created in this cluster at z=0.83. The giant-to-dwarf ratio in MS1054-0321 starts to increase inwards of the virial radius or when Sigma>30 Mpc^-2, coinciding with the environment where the galaxy star formation rate and the morphology-density relation start to appear. (abridged)
  • We combine imaging data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) with VLT/FORS optical spectroscopy to study the properties of star-forming galaxies in the z=0.837 cluster CL0152-1357. We have morphological information for 24 star-forming cluster galaxies, which range in morphology from late-type and irregular to compact early-type galaxies. We find that while most star-forming galaxies have $r_{625}-i_{775}$ colors bluer than 1.0, eight are in the red cluster sequence. Among the star-forming cluster population we find five compact early-type galaxies which have properties consistent with their identification as progenitors of dwarf elliptical galaxies. The spatial distribution of the star-forming cluster members is nonuniform. We find none within $R\sim 500$ Mpc of the cluster center, which is highly suggestive of an intracluster medium interaction. We derive star formation rates from [OII] $\lambda\lambda 3727$ line fluxes, and use these to compare the global star formation rate of CL0152-1357 to other clusters at low and intermediate redshifts. We find a tentative correlation between integrated star formation rates and $T_{X}$, in the sense that hotter clusters have lower integrated star formation rates. Additional data from clusters with low X-ray temperatures is needed to confirm this trend. We do not find a significant correlation with redshift, suggesting that evolution is either weak or absent between z=0.2-0.8.
  • We measure the luminosity function of morphologically selected E/S0 galaxies from $z=0.5$ to $z=1.0$ using deep high resolution Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging data. Our analysis covers an area of $48\Box\arcmin$ (8$\times$ the area of the HDF-N) and extends 2 magnitudes deeper ($I\sim24$ mag) than was possible in the Deep Groth Strip Survey (DGSS). At $0.5<z<0.75$, we find $M_B^*-5\log h_{0.7}=-21.1\pm0.3$ and $\alpha=-0.53\pm0.2$, and at $0.75<z<1.0$, we find $M_B^*-5\log h_{0.7}=-21.4\pm0.2$. These luminosity functions are similar in both shape and number density to the luminosity function using morphological selection (e.g., DGSS), but are much steeper than the luminosity functions of samples selected using morphological proxies like the color or spectral energy distribution (e.g., CFRS, CADIS, or COMBO-17). The difference is due to the `blue', $(U-V)_0<1.7$, E/S0 galaxies, which make up to $\sim30%$ of the sample at all magnitudes and an increasing proportion of faint galaxies. We thereby demonstrate the need for {\it both morphological and structural information} to constrain the evolution of galaxies. We find that the `blue' E/S0 galaxies have the same average sizes and Sersic parameters as the `red', $(U-V)_0>1.7$, E/S0 galaxies at brighter luminosities ($M_B<-20.1$), but are increasingly different at fainter magnitudes where `blue' galaxies are both smaller and have lower Sersic parameters. Fits of the colors to stellar population models suggest that most E/S0 galaxies have short star-formation time scales ($\tau<1$ Gyr), and that galaxies have formed at an increasing rate from $z\sim8$ until $z\sim2$ after which there has been a gradual decline.
  • The properties of Ultra Compact Dwarf (UCD) galaxy candidates in Abell 1689 (z=0.183) are investigated, based on deep high resolution ACS images. A UCD candidate has to be unresolved, have i<28 (M_V<-11.5) mag and satisfy color limits derived from Bayesian photometric redshifts. We find 160 UCD candidates with 22<i<28 mag. It is estimated that about 100 of these are cluster members, based on their spatial distribution and photometric redshifts. For i>26.8 mag, the radial and luminosity distribution of the UCD candidates can be explained well by Abell 1689's globular cluster (GC) system. For i<26.8 mag, there is an overpopulation of 15 +/- 5 UCD candidates with respect to the GC luminosity function. For i<26 mag, the radial distribution of UCD candidates is more consistent with the dwarf galaxy population than with the GC system of Abell 1689. The UCD candidates follow a color-magnitude trend with a slope similar to that of Abell 1689's genuine dwarf galaxy population, but shifted fainter by about 2-3 mag. Two of the three brightest UCD candidates (M_V ~ -17 mag) are slightly resolved. At the distance of Abell 1689, these two objects would have King-profile core radii of ~35 pc and r_eff ~300 pc, implying luminosities and sizes 2-3 times those of M32's bulge. Additional photometric redshifts obtained with late type stellar and elliptical galaxy templates support the assignment of these two resolved sources to Abell 1689. Our findings imply that in Abell 1689 there are at least 10 UCDs with M_V<-12.7 mag. Compared to the UCDs in the Fornax cluster they are brighter, larger and have colors closer to normal dwarf galaxies. This suggests that they may be in an intermediate stage of the stripping process. Spectroscopy is needed to definitely confirm the existence of UCDs in Abell 1689.
  • We discuss our current progress in studying a sample of z>0.8 clusters of galaxies from the ROSAT Distant Cluster Survey. To date, we have Chandra observations for four of the ten clusters. We find that the morphology of two of these four are quite regular, with deviations from circular of less than 5%, while two are strikingly elliptical. When the temperatures and luminosities of our sample are grouped with six other high-redshift measurements, there is no measured evolution in the luminosity-temperature relation. We identify a number of X-ray emitting point sources that are potential cluster members. These could be sources of intracluster medium heating, adding the entropy necessary to explain the cluster luminosity-temperature relation.
  • We analyze the ROSAT Deep Cluster Survey (RDCS) to derive cosmological constraints from the evolution of the cluster X-ray luminosity distribution. The sample contains 103 galaxy clusters out to z=0.85 and flux-limit Flim=3 10^{-14} cgs (RDCS-3) in the [0.5-2.0] keV energy band, with a high-z extension containing four clusters at 0.90<z<1.26 and F>1 10^{-14} cgs (RDCS-1). Model predictions for the cluster mass function are converted into the X-ray luminosity function in two steps. First we convert mass into intra-cluster gas temperature by assuming hydrostatic equilibrium. Then temperature is converted into X-ray luminosity by using the most recent data on the Lx-T relation for nearby and distant clusters. These include the Chandra data for seven distant clusters at 0.57<z<1.27. From RDCS-3 we find \Omega_m=0.35+/-0.12 and \sigma_8=0.66+/-0.06 for a spatially flat Universe with cosmological constant, with no significant constraint on \Gamma . Even accounting for theoretical and observational uncertainties in the mass/X-ray luminosity conversion, an Einstein-de-Sitter model is always excluded at far more than the 3sigma level.
  • The Chandra X-ray Observatory was used to obtain a 190 ks image of three high redshift galaxy clusters in one observation. The results of our analysis of these data are reported for the two z > 1 clusters in this Lynx field, including the most distant known X-ray selected cluster. Spatially-extended X-ray emission was detected from both these clusters, indicating the presence of hot gas in their intracluster media. A fit to the X-ray spectrum of RX J0849+4452, at z=1.26, yields a temperature of kT = 5.8^{+2.8}_{-1.7} keV. Using this temperature and the assumption of an isothermal sphere, the total mass of RX J0849+4452 is found to be 4.0^{+2.4}_{-1.9} X 10^{14} h_{65}^{-1} M_{\sun} within r = 1 h_{65}^{-1} Mpc. The T_x for RX J0849+4452 approximately agrees with the expectation based on its L_{bol} = 3.3^{+0.9}_{-0.5} X 10^{44}$ erg s$^{-1} according to the low redshift L_x - T_x relation. The very different distributions of X-ray emitting gas and of the red member galaxies in the two z > 1 clusters, in contrast to the similarity of the optical/IR colors of those galaxies, suggests that the early-type galaxies mostly formed before their host clusters.
  • This paper presents and gives the COP (COP: CFHT Optical PDCS; CFHT: Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope; PDCS: Palomar Distant Cluster Survey) survey data. We describe our photometric and spectroscopic observations with the MOS multi-slit spectrograph at the CFH telescope. A comparison of the photometry from the PDCS (Postman et al. 1996) catalogs and from the new images we have obtained at the CFH telescope shows that the different magnitude systems can be cross-calibrated. After identification between the PDCS catalogues and our new images, we built catalogues with redshift, coordinates and V, I and Rmagnitudes. We have classified the galaxies along the lines of sight into field and structure galaxies using a gap technique (Katgert et al. 1996). In total we have observed 18 significant structures along the 10 lines of sight.
  • As a continuation of our study of the faint galaxy luminosity function in the Coma cluster of galaxies, we report here on the first spectroscopic observations of very faint galaxies (R $\le$ 21.5) in the direction of the core of this cluster. Out of these 34 galaxies, only one may have a redshift consistent with Coma, all others are background objects. The predicted number of Coma galaxies is 6.7 $\pm$ 6.0, according to Bernstein et al. (1995, B95). If we add the 17 galaxies observed by Secker (1997), we end up with 5 galaxies belonging to Coma, while the expected number is 16.0 $\pm$ 11.0 according to B95. Notice that these two independent surveys lead to the same results. Although the observations and predicted values agree within the error, such results raise into question the validity of statistical subtraction of background objects commonly used to derive cluster luminosity functions (e.g. B95). More spectroscopic observations in this cluster and others are therefore urgently needed. As a by-product, we report on the discovery of a physical structure at a redshift z$\simeq$0.5.
  • We present here results from a deep spectroscopic survey of the Coma cluster of galaxies (29 galaxies between 18.98<m_R<21.5). Only 1 of these galaxies is within Coma compared to an expected 6.7 galaxies computed from nearby control fields. This discrepancy potentially indicates that Coma's faint end luminosity function has been grossly overestimated and raises concerns about the validity of using 2D statistical subtraction to correct for the background galaxy population when constructing cluster luminosity functions.
  • We present new and exciting results on our search for large-scale structure at high redshift. Specifically, we have just completed a detailed analysis of the area surrounding the cluster CL0016+16 (z=0.546) and have the most compelling evidence yet that this cluster resides in the middle of a supercluster. From the distribution of galaxies and clusters we find that the supercluster appears to be a sheet of galaxies, viewed almost edge-on, with a radial extent of 31 Mpc, transverse dimension of 12 Mpc, and a thickness of ~4 Mpc. The surface density and velocity dispersion of this coherent structure are consistent with the properties of the ``Great Wall'' in the CfA redshift survey.