• The recent discoveries of many double neutron star systems and their detection as LIGO-Virgo merger events call for a detailed understanding of their origin. Explosions of ultra-stripped stars in binary systems have been shown to play a key role in this context and have also generated interest as a potential explanation for rapidly evolving hydrogen-free transients. Here we present the first attempt to model such explosions based on binary evolution calculations that follow the mass transfer to the companion to obtain a consistent core-envelope structure as needed for reliable predictions of the supernova transient. We simulate the explosion in 2D and 3D, and confirm the modest explosion energies ~10^50erg and small kick velocities reported earlier in 2D models based on bare carbon-oxygen cores. The spin-up of the neutron star by asymmetric accretion is small in 3D with no indication of spin-kick alignment. Simulations up to shock breakout show the mixing of sizeable amounts of iron group material into the helium envelope. In view of recent ideas for a mixing-length treatment (MLT) of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in supernovae, we perform a detailed analysis of the mixing, which reveals evidence for buoyancy-drag balance, but otherwise does not support the MLT approximation. The mixing may have implications for the spectroscopic signatures of ultra-stripped supernovae that need to be investigated in the future. Our stellar evolution calculation also predicts presupernova mass loss due to an off-centre silicon deflagration flash, which suggests that supernovae from extremely stripped cores may show signs of interactions with circumstellar material.
  • The evolutionary pathways of core-collapse supernova progenitors at the low-mass end of the spectrum are beset with major uncertainties. In recent years, a variety of evolutionary channels has been discovered in addition to the classical electron capture supernova channel of super-AGB stars. The few available progenitor models at the low-mass end have been studied with great success in supernova simulations as the peculiar density structure makes for robust neutrino-driven explosions in this mass range. Detailed nucleosynthesis calculations have been conducted both for models of electron capture supernovae and low-mass iron core supernovae and revealed an interesting production of the lighter trans-iron elements (such as Zn, Sr, Y, Zr) as well as rare isotopes like Ca-48 and Fe-60. We stress the need to explore the low-mass end of the supernova spectrum further and link various observables to understand the diversity of explosions in this regime.
  • The explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae is a long-standing problem in stellar astrophysics. We briefly outline the main contenders for a solution and review recent efforts to model core-collapse supernova explosions by means of multi-dimensional simulations. We discuss several suggestions for solving the problem of missing or delayed neutrino-driven explosions in three-dimensional supernova models, including -- among others -- variations in the microphysics and large seed perturbations in convective burning shells. Focusing on the neutrino-driven mechanism, we summarise currents efforts to predict supernova explosion and remnant properties based on first-principle models and on more phenomenological approaches.
  • We demonstrate the operation of low-noise nano superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) based on the high critical field and high critical temperature superconductor YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_7$ (YBCO) as ultra-sensitive magnetometers for single magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The nanoSQUIDs exploit the Josephson behavior of YBCO grain boundaries and have been patterned by focused ion beam milling. This allows to precisely define the lateral dimensions of the SQUIDs so as to achieve large magnetic coupling between the nanoloop and individual MNPs. By means of focused electron beam induced deposition, cobalt MNPs with typical size of several tens of nm have been grown directly on the surface of the sensors with nanometric spatial resolution. Remarkably, the nanoSQUIDs are operative over extremely broad ranges of applied magnetic field (-1 T $< \mu_0 H <$ 1 T) and temperature (0.3 K $< T<$ 80 K). All these features together have allowed us to perform magnetization measurements under different ambient conditions and to detect the magnetization reversal of individual Co MNPs with magnetic moments (1 - 30) $\times 10^6\,\mu_{\rm B}$. Depending on the dimensions and shape of the particles we have distinguished between two different magnetic states yielding different reversal mechanisms. The magnetization reversal is thermally activated over an energy barrier, which has been quantified for the (quasi) single-domain particles. Our measurements serve to show not only the high sensitivity achievable with YBCO nanoSQUIDs, but also demonstrate that these sensors are exceptional magnetometers for the investigation of the properties of individual nanomagnets.
  • Models of core-collapse supernova explosions powered by the neutrino-driven mechanism have matured considerable in recent years. Explosions at the low-mass end of the progenitor spectrum can routinely be simulated in 1D, 2D, and 3D and allow us to study supernova nucleosynthesis based on first-principle models. Results of nucleosynthesis calculations indicate that supernovae of the lowest masses could be important contributors of some lighter n-rich elements beyond iron. The explosion mechanism of more massive stars is still under investigation, although first 3D models of neutrino-driven explosions employing multi-group neutrino transport have recently become available. Together with earlier 2D models and more simplified 3D simulations, these have elucidated the interplay between neutrino heating and hydrodynamic instabilities in the post-shock region that is essential for shock revival. However, some physical ingredients may still need to be added or improved before simulations can robustly explain supernova explosions over a wide mass range. We explore possible issues that may affect the accuracy of supernova simulations, and review some of the ideas that have recently been explored as avenues to robust explosions, including uncertainties in the neutrino rates, rapid rotation, and an external forcing of non-radial fluid motions by strong seed perturbations from convective shell burning. The perturbation-aided neutrino-driven mechanism and the implications of recent 3D simulations of shell burning in supernova progenitors are discussed in detail. The efficacy of the perturbation-aided mechanism is illustrated by the first successful multi-group neutrino hydrodynamics simulation of an 18 solar mass progenitor with 3D initial conditions. We conclude with speculations about the potential impact of 3D effects on the structure of massive stars through convective boundary mixing. (abridged)
  • We present the design, realization and performance of a three-axis vector nano Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (nanoSQUID). It consists of three mutually orthogonal SQUID nanoloops that allow distinguishing the three components of the vector magnetic moment of individual nanoparticles placed at a specific position. The device is based on Nb/HfTi/Nb Josephson junctions and exhibits linewidths of $\sim 250$ nm and inner loop areas of $600 \times 90$ nm$^2$ and $500 \times 500$ nm$^2$. Operation at temperature $T=4.2$ K, under external magnetic fields up to $\sim 50$ mT is demonstrated. The experimental flux noise below $\sim 250$ ${\rm n}\Phi_0/\sqrt{\rm Hz}$ in the white noise limit and the reduced dimensions lead to a total calculated spin sensitivity of $\sim 630$ $\mu_{\rm B}/\sqrt{\rm Hz}$ and $\sim 70$ $\mu_{\rm B}/\sqrt{\rm Hz}$ for the in-plane and out-of-plane components of the vector magnetic moment, respectively. The potential of the device for studying tridimensional properties of individual nanomagnets is discussed.
  • We present a new approach to understand the landscape of supernova explosion energies, ejected nickel masses, and neutron star birth masses. In contrast to other recent parametric approaches, our model predicts the properties of neutrino-driven explosions based on the pre-collapse stellar structure without the need for hydrodynamic simulations. The model is based on physically motivated scaling laws and simple differential equations describing the shock propagation, the contraction of the neutron star, the neutrino emission, the heating conditions, and the explosion energetics. Using model parameters compatible with multi-D simulations and a fine grid of thousands of supernova progenitors, we obtain a variegated landscape of neutron star and black hole formation similar to other parameterised approaches and find good agreement with semi-empirical measures for the "explodability" of massive stars. Our predicted explosion properties largely conform to observed correlations between the nickel mass and explosion energy. Accounting for the coexistence of outflows and downflows during the explosion phase, we naturally obtain a positive correlation between explosion energy and ejecta mass. These correlations are relatively robust against parameter variations, but our results suggest that there is considerable leeway in parametric models to widen or narrow the mass ranges for black hole and neutron star formation and to scale explosion energies up or down. Our model is currently limited to an all-or-nothing treatment of fallback and there remain some minor discrepancies between model predictions and observational constraints.
  • Measurements of explosive nucleosynthesis yields in core-collapse supernovae provide tests for explosion models. We investigate constraints on explosive conditions derivable from measured amounts of nickel and iron after radioactive decays using nucleosynthesis networks with parameterized thermodynamic trajectories. The Ni/Fe ratio is for most regimes dominated by the production ratio of 58Ni/(54Fe + 56Ni), which tends to grow with higher neutron excess and with higher entropy. For SN 2012ec, a supernova that produced a Ni/Fe ratio of $3.4\pm1.2$ times solar, we find that burning of a fuel with neutron excess $\eta \approx 6\times 10^{-3}$ is required. Unless the progenitor metallicity is over 5 times solar, the only layer in the progenitor with such a neutron excess is the silicon shell. Supernovae producing large amounts of stable nickel thus suggest that this deep-lying layer can be, at least partially, ejected in the explosion. We find that common spherically symmetric models of $M_{\rm ZAMS} \lesssim 13$ Msun stars exploding with a delay time of less than one second ($M_{\rm cut} < 1.5$ Msun) are able to achieve such silicon-shell ejection. Supernovae that produce solar or sub-solar Ni/Fe ratios, such as SN 1987A, must instead have burnt and ejected only oxygen-shell material, which allows a lower limit to the mass cut to be set. Finally, we find that the extreme Ni/Fe value of 60-75 times solar derived for the Crab cannot be reproduced by any realistic-entropy burning outside the iron core, and neutrino-neutronization obtained in electron-capture models remains the only viable explanation.
  • Since core-collapse supernova simulations still struggle to produce robust neutrino-driven explosions in 3D, it has been proposed that asphericities caused by convection in the progenitor might facilitate shock revival by boosting the activity of non-radial hydrodynamic instabilities in the post-shock region. We investigate this scenario in depth using 42 relativistic 2D simulations with multi-group neutrino transport to examine the effects of velocity and density perturbations in the progenitor for different perturbation geometries that obey fundamental physical constraints (like the anelastic condition). As a framework for analysing our results, we introduce semi-empirical scaling laws relating neutrino heating, average turbulent velocities in the gain region, and the shock deformation in the saturation limit of non-radial instabilities. The squared turbulent Mach number, <Ma^2>, reflects the violence of aspherical motions in the gain layer, and explosive runaway occurs for <Ma^2>~0.3, corresponding to a reduction of the critical neutrino luminosity by ~25% compared to 1D. In the light of this theory, progenitor asphericities aid shock revival mainly by creating anisotropic mass flux onto the shock: Differential infall efficiently converts velocity perturbations in the progenitor into density perturbations (Delta rho/rho) at the shock of the order of the initial convective Mach number Ma. The anisotropic mass flux and ram pressure deform the shock and thereby amplify post-shock turbulence. Large-scale (l=2,l=1) modes prove most conducive to shock revival, whereas small-scale perturbations require unrealistically high convective Mach numbers. Initial density perturbations in the progenitor are only of order Ma^2 and therefore play a subdominant role.
  • This White Paper presents the science case of an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), focused on the structure and interactions of gluon-dominated matter, with the intent to articulate it to the broader nuclear science community. It was commissioned by the managements of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) with the objective of presenting a summary of scientific opportunities and goals of the EIC as a follow-up to the 2007 NSAC Long Range plan. This document is a culmination of a community-wide effort in nuclear science following a series of workshops on EIC physics and, in particular, the focused ten-week program on "Gluons and quark sea at high energies" at the Institute for Nuclear Theory in Fall 2010. It contains a brief description of a few golden physics measurements along with accelerator and detector concepts required to achieve them, and it benefited from inputs from the users' communities of BNL and JLab. This White Paper offers the promise to propel the QCD science program in the U.S., established with the CEBAF accelerator at JLab and the RHIC collider at BNL, to the next QCD frontier.
  • To describe theoretically the creation and evolution of the quark-gluon plasma, one typically employs three ingredients: a model for the initial state, non-hydrodynamic early time evolution, and hydrodynamics. In this paper we study the non-hydrodynamic early time evolution using the AdS/CFT correspondence in the presence of inhomogeneities. We find that the AdS description of the early time evolution is well-matched by free streaming. Near the end of the early time interval where our analytic computations are reliable, the stress tensor agrees with the second order hydrodynamic stress tensor computed from the local energy density and fluid velocity. Our techniques may also be useful for the study of far-from-equilibrium strongly coupled systems in other areas of physics.
  • The sudden injection of energy in a strongly coupled conformal field theory and its subsequent thermalization can be holographically modeled by a shell falling into anti-de Sitter space and forming a black brane. For a homogeneous shell, Bhattacharyya and Minwalla were able to study this process analytically using a weak field approximation. Motivated by event-by-event fluctuations in heavy ion collisions, we include inhomogeneities in this model, obtaining analytic results in a long wavelength expansion. In the early-time window in which our approximations can be trusted, the resulting evolution matches well with that of a simple free streaming model. Near the end of this time window, we find that the stress tensor approaches that of second-order viscous hydrodynamics. We comment on possible lessons for heavy ion phenomenology.
  • Using Wigner transforms of Green functions, we discuss non-equilibrium generalizations of spectral functions and occupation numbers. We develop methods for computing time-dependent spectral functions in conformal field theories holographically dual to thin-shell AdS-Vaidya spacetimes.
  • We present an analysis of the dynamics of the equifacial pentahedron on the Kapovich-Millson phase space under a volume preserving Hamiltonian. The classical dynamics of polyhedra under such a Hamiltonian may arise from the classical limit of the node volume operators in loop quantum gravity. The pentahedron is the simplest nontrivial polyhedron for which the dynamics may be chaotic. We consider the distribution of polyhedral configurations throughout the space and find indications that the borders between certain configurations act as separatrices. We examine the local stability of trajectories within this phase space and find that locally unstable regions dominate although extended stable regions are present. Canonical and microcanonical estimates of the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy suggest that the pentahedron is a strongly chaotic system. The presence of chaos is further suggested by calculations of intermediate time Lyapunov exponents which saturate to non zero values.
  • Using the Bjorken expansion model we study the effect of intrinsic hydrodynamic noise on the correlations observed in heavy-ion collisions.
  • We present a systematic study of dijet suppression at RHIC using the VNI/BMS parton cascade code. We examine the medium modification of the dijet asymmetry $A_j$ and the energy distribution within the dijets. Understanding the sensitivity of these observables to properties of the deconfined medium and to experimental factors is vital if dijets are to be useful for QCD tomography. VNI/BMS provides a controllable test-bed with sufficient complexity to model jet modification without confounding results with fluctuations from hydrodynamics and hadronization. Dijets are examined under the modification of: the jet transport coefficient $\hat{q}$; the path length of leading and sub-leading jets; jet cone angle and the jet-medium interaction mechanism. We find that $A_j$ is very sensitive to the distance traveled by the secondary jet, the jet shape is dominated by $\hat{q}$ and the nature of the interaction mechanism.
  • We develop the relativistic theory of hydrodynamic fluctuations for application to high energy heavy ion collisions. In particular, we investigate their effect on the expanding boost-invariant (Bjorken) solution of the hydrodynamic equations. We discover that correlations over a long rapidity range are induced by the propagation of the sound modes. Due to the expansion, the dispersion law for these modes is non-linear and attenuated even in the limit of zero viscosity. As a result, there is a non-dissipative wake behind the sound front which is generated by any instantaneous point-like fluctuation. We evaluate the two-particle correlators using the initial conditions and hydrodynamic parameters relevant for heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. In principle these correlators can be used to obtain information about the viscosities because the magnitudes of the fluctuations are directly proportional to them.
  • Using the AdS/CFT correspondence, we probe the scale-dependence of thermalization in strongly coupled field theories following a quench via saddlepoint calculations of 2-point functions, Wilson loops and entanglement entropy in $d=2,3,4$. For homogeneous initial conditions, the entanglement entropy thermalizes slowest, and sets a timescale for equilibration that saturates a causality bound. The growth rate of entanglement entropy density is nearly volume-independent for small volumes, but slows for larger volumes. In this strongly coupled setting, the UV thermalizes first.
  • We report characterization results by energy dispersive x-ray analysis and AC-susceptibility for a statistically relevant number of single layer Bi-cuprate single crystals. We show that the two structurally quite different modifications of the single-layered Bi-cuprate, namely (La,Pb=0.4)-Bi2201 and La-Bi2201, exhibit anomalies in the superconducting transition temperature at certain hole doping, e.g. at 1/8 holes per Cu. These doping values agree well with the 'magic doping fractions' found in the temperature dependent resistance of LSCO by Komiya et al. This new set of findings suggests that all these anomalies are generic for the hole-doped high-temperature superconductors.
  • Understanding the underlying mechanisms causing rapid thermalization deduced for high-energy heavy ion collisions is still a challenge. To estimate the thermalization time, entropy growth for classical Yang-Mills theories is studied, based on the determination of Lyapunov exponents. Distinct regimes for short, medium and long sampling times are characterized by different properties of their spectrum of Lyapunov exponents. Clarifying the existence of these regimes and their implications for gauge-field dynamics is one of the results of this contribution. As a phenomenological application we conclude that for pure gauge theories with random initial conditions thermalization occurs within few fm/c, an estimate which can be reduced by the inclusion of fermions, specific initial conditions, etc.
  • The average transverse momentum transfer per unit path length to a fast parton scattering elastically in a perturbative quark-gluon plasma is related to the radiative energy loss of the parton. We first calculate the momentum transfer coefficient $\hat q$ in terms of a classical Langevin problem and then define it quantum-mechanically through scattering matrix element. After treating the well known case of a quark-gluon plasma in equilibrium we consider an off-equilibrium unstable plasma. As a specific example, we treat the two-stream plasma with unstable modes of longitudinal chromoelectric field. In the presence of the instabilities, $\hat q$ is shown to exponentially grow in time.
  • The presence of a critical point in the QCD phase diagram can deform the trajectories describing the evolution of the expanding fireball in the QCD phase diagram. The deformation of the hydrodynamic trajectories will change the transverse velocity dependence of the proton-antiproton ratio when the fireball passes in the vicinity of the critical point. An unusual transverse velocity dependence of the anti-proton/proton ratio in a narrow beam energy window would thus signal the presence of the critical point.
  • The total energy deposited into the medium per unit length by a fast parton traversing a quark-gluon plasma is calculated. We take the medium excitation due to collisions to be given by the well known expression for the collisional drag force. The parton's radiative energy loss contributes to the energy deposition because each radiated gluon acts as an additional source of collisional energy loss in the medium. In our model, this leads to a length dependence on the differential energy loss due to the interactions of radiated gluons with the medium. The final result, which is a sum of the primary and the secondary contributions, is then treated as the coefficient of a local hydrodynamic source term. Results are presented for energy density wave induced by two fast, back-to-back partons created in an initial hard interaction.
  • We review what is known about the contributions to the final entropy from the different stages of a relativistic nuclear collision, including recent results on the decoherence entropy and the entropy produced during the hydrodynamic phase by viscous effects. We then present a general framework, based on the Husimi distribution function, for the calculation of entropy growth in quantum field theories, which is applicable to the earliest ("glasma") phase of the collision during which most of the entropy is generated. The entropy calculated from the Husimi distribution exhibits linear growth when the quantum field contains unstable modes and is asymptotically equal to the Kolmogorov-Sina\"i (KS) entropy. We outline how the approach can be used to investigate the problem of entropy production in a relativistic heavy-ion reaction from first principles.
  • We calculate the total energy deposited into the medium per unit length by fast partons traversing a quark-gluon plasma. The medium excitation due to collisions is taken to be given by the well known expression for the collisional drag force. The radiative energy loss of the parton contributes to the energy deposition because each radiated gluon acts as an additional source of collisional energy loss in the medium. We derive a differential equation which governs how the spectrum of radiated gluons is modified when this energy loss is taken into account. This modified spectrum is then used to calculate the additional energy deposition due to the interactions of radiated gluons with the medium. Numerical results are presented for the medium response for the case of two energetic back-to-back partons created in a hard interaction.