• Recently, low frequency, broadband radio emission has been observed accompanying bright meteors by the Long Wavelength Array (LWA). The broadband spectra between 20 and 60 MHz were captured for several events, while the spectral index (dependence of flux density on frequency, with $S_\nu \propto \nu^\alpha$) was estimated to be $-4\pm1$ during the peak of meteor afterglows. Here we present a survey of meteor emission and other transient events using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) at 72-103 MHz. In our 322-hour survey, down to a $5\sigma$ detection threshold of 3.5 Jy/beam, no transient candidates were identified as intrinsic emission from meteors. We derived an upper limit of -3.7 (95% confidence limit) on the spectral index in our frequency range. We also report detections of other transient events, like reflected FM broadcast signals from small satellites, conclusively demonstrating the ability of the MWA to detect and track space debris on scales as small as 0.1 m in low Earth orbits.
  • Recent studies of fast radio bursts (FRBs) have led to many theories associating them with young neutron stars. If this is the case, then the presence of supernova ejecta and stellar winds provide a changing dispersion measure (DM) and rotation measure (RM) that can potentially be useful probes of the environments of FRB progenitors. Here we summarize the expected scalings for the DM and RM in the cases of a constant density ambient medium and of a progenitor stellar wind. A magnetized stellar wind is especially interesting since it could naturally provide a structured field to contribute to the RM as the wind is swept up by the supernova. Since the amount of ionized material is controlled by the dynamics of the reverse shock, we find the DM changes more slowly than in previous simpler work, which simply assumed a constant ionization fraction. Furthermore, the DM can be constant or even increasing as the supernova remnant sweeps up material, arguing that a young neutron star hypothesis for FRBs is not ruled out if the DM is not decreasing over repeated bursts. The combined DM and RM measurements for the repeating FRB 121102 are consistent with supernova ejecta with an age of $\sim10^2-10^3\,{\rm yrs}$ expanding into a high density ($\sim100\,{\rm cm^{-3}}$) interstellar medium. This naturally explains its relatively constant DM over many years as well. Other FRBs with much lower RMs may indicate that they are especially young supernovae in wind environments or that their DMs are largely from the intergalactic medium. In light of this, we caution about inferring magnetic fields from simply dividing an RM by DM, because these quantities could originate from distinct regions along the path an FRB propagates.
  • The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) is a novel transit radio telescope operating across the 400-800-MHz band. CHIME is comprised of four 20-m x 100-m semi-cylindrical paraboloid reflectors, each of which has 256 dual-polarization feeds suspended along its axis, giving it a >200 square degree field-of-view. This, combined with wide bandwidth, high sensitivity, and a powerful correlator makes CHIME an excellent instrument for the detection of Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs). The CHIME Fast Radio Burst Project (CHIME/FRB) will search beam-formed, high time-and frequency-resolution data in real time for FRBs in the CHIME field-of-view. Here we describe the CHIME/FRB backend, including the real-time FRB search and detection software pipeline as well as the planned offline analyses. We estimate a CHIME/FRB detection rate of 2-42 FRBs/sky/day normalizing to the rate estimated at 1.4-GHz by Vander Wiel et al. (2016). Likely science outcomes of CHIME/FRB are also discussed. CHIME/FRB is currently operational in a commissioning phase, with science operations expected to commence in the latter half of 2018.
  • We report the discovery of an unusual stellar system, SMSS J130522.47-293113.0. The optical spectrum is dominated by a blue continuum together with emission lines of hydrogen, neutral and ionized helium, and the N III, C III blend at around 4640-4650 Angstrom. The emission line profiles vary in strength and position on timescales as short as 1 day, while optical photometry reveals fluctuations of as much as ~0.2 mag in g on timescales as short as 10-15 min. The system is a weak X-ray source (f_{0.3-10} = (1.2 +/- 0.1) x 10^{-13} ergs cm^{-2} s^{-1} in the 0.3-10 keV band) but is not detected at radio wavelengths (3-sigma upper limit of 50 microJy at 5.5 GHz). The most intriguing property of the system, however, is the existence of two "blobs", a few arcsec in size, that are symmetrically located 3.8 arcmin (2.2 pc for our preferred system distance of ~2 kpc) each side of the central object. The blobs are detected in optical and near-IR broadband images but do not show any excess emission in Halpha images. We discuss the interpretation of the system, suggesting that the central object is most likely a nova-like CV, and that the blobs are relics of a pc-scale accretion-powered collimated outflow.
  • We consider the possible observation of Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) with planned future radio telescopes, and investigate how well the dispersions and redshifts of these signals might constrain cosmological parameters. We construct mock catalogues of FRB dispersion measure (DM) data and employ Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis, with which we forecast and compare with existing constraints in the flat $\Lambda$CDM model, as well as some popular extensions that include dark energy equation of state and curvature parameters. We find that the scatter in DM observations caused by inhomogeneities in the intergalactic medium (IGM) poses a big challenge to the utility of FRBs as a cosmic probe. Only in the most optimistic case, with a high number of events and low IGM variance, do FRBs aid in improving current constraints. In particular, when FRBs are combined with CMB+BAO+SNe+$H_0$ data, we find the biggest improvement comes in the $\Omega_{\mathrm b}h^2$ constraint. Also, we find that the dark energy equation of state is poorly constrained, while the constraint on the curvature parameter $\Omega_k$, shows some improvement when combined with current constraints. When FRBs are combined with future BAO data from 21cm Intensity Mapping (IM), we find little improvement over the constraints from BAOs alone. However, the inclusion of FRBs introduces an additional parameter constraint, $\Omega_{\mathrm b}h^2$, which turns out to be comparable to existing constraints. This suggest that FRBs provide valuable information about the cosmological baryon density in the intermediate redshift Universe, independent of high redshift CMB data.
  • Diagnostics of polarized emission provide us with valuable information on the Galactic magnetic field and the state of turbulence in the interstellar medium, which cannot be obtained from synchrotron intensity alone. In Paper I (Herron et al. 2017b), we derived polarization diagnostics that are rotationally and translationally invariant in the $Q$-$U$ plane, similar to the polarization gradient. In this paper, we apply these diagnostics to simulations of ideal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that have a range of sonic and Alfv\'enic Mach numbers. We generate synthetic images of Stokes $Q$ and $U$ for these simulations, for the cases where the turbulence is illuminated from behind by uniform polarized emission, and where the polarized emission originates from within the turbulent volume. From these simulated images we calculate the polarization diagnostics derived in Paper I, for different lines of sight relative to the mean magnetic field, and for a range of frequencies. For all of our simulations, we find that the polarization gradient is very similar to the generalized polarization gradient, and that both trace spatial variations in the magnetoionic medium for the case where emission originates within the turbulent volume, provided that the medium is not supersonic. We propose a method for distinguishing the cases of emission coming from behind or within a turbulent, Faraday rotating medium, and a method to partly map the rotation measure of the observed region. We also speculate on statistics of these diagnostics that may allow us to constrain the physical properties of an observed turbulent region.
  • We present observations and analysis of the polarized radio emission from the nearby radio galaxy Fornax A over 1.28--3.1 GHz, using data from the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). In this, the first of two associated papers, we use modern broadband polarimetric techniques to examine the nature and origin of conspicuous low-polarization (low-$p$) patches in the lobes. We resolve the low-$p$ patches, and find that their low fractional polarization is associated with complicated frequency-dependent interference in the polarized signal generated by Faraday effects along the line of sight. The low-$p$ patches are spatially correlated with interfaces in the magnetic structure of the lobe, across which the line-of-sight-projected magnetic field changes direction. Spatial correlations with the sky-projected magnetic field orientation and structure in total intensity are also identified and discussed. We argue that the low-$p$ patches, along with associated reversals in the line-of-sight magnetic field and other related phenomena, are best explained by the presence of $\mathcal{O}(10^9)$ $M_\odot$ of magnetized thermal plasma in the lobes, structured in shells or filaments, and likely advected from the ISM of NCG 1316 or its surrounding ICM. Our study underscores the power and utility of spatially-resolved, broadband, full-polarization radio observations to reveal new facets of flow behaviors and magneto-ionic structure in radio lobes and their interplay with the surrounding environment.
  • We present full-polarisation, broadband observations of the radio galaxy NGC 612 (PKS B0131-637) from 1.3 to 3.1 GHz using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The relatively large angular scale of the radio galaxy makes it a good candidate with which to investigate the polarisation mechanisms responsible for the observed Faraday depth structure. By fitting complex polarisation models to the polarised spectrum of each pixel, we find that a single polarisation component can adequately describe the observed signal for the majority of the radio galaxy. While we cannot definitively rule out internal Faraday rotation, we argue that the bulk of the Faraday rotation is taking place in a thin skin that girts the polarised emission. Using minimum energy estimates, we find an implied total magnetic field strength of 4.2 microG.
  • Linearly polarized emission is described, in general, in terms of the Stokes parameters $Q$ and $U$, from which the polarization intensity and polarization angle can be determined. Although the polarization intensity and polarization angle provide an intuitive description of the polarization, they are affected by the limitations of interferometric data, such as missing single-dish data in the u-v plane, from which radio frequency interferometric data is visualized. To negate the effects of these artefacts, it is desirable for polarization diagnostics to be rotationally and translationally invariant in the $Q$-$U$ plane. One rotationally and translationally invariant quantity, the polarization gradient, has been shown to provide a unique view of spatial variations in the turbulent interstellar medium when applied to diffuse radio frequency synchrotron emission. In this paper we develop a formalism to derive additional rotationally and translationally invariant quantities. We present new diagnostics that can be applied to diffuse or point-like polarized emission in any waveband, including a generalization of the polarization gradient, the polarization directional curvature, polarization wavelength derivative, and polarization wavelength curvature. In Paper II we will apply these diagnostics to observed and simulated images of diffuse radio frequency synchrotron emission.
  • The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), located in Western Australia, is one of the low-frequency precursors of the international Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project. In addition to pursuing its own ambitious science program, it is also a testbed for wide range of future SKA activities ranging from hardware, software to data analysis. The key science programs for the MWA and SKA require very high dynamic ranges, which challenges calibration and imaging systems. Correct calibration of the instrument and accurate measurements of source flux densities and polarisations require precise characterisation of the telescope's primary beam. Recent results from the MWA GaLactic Extragalactic All-sky MWA (GLEAM) survey show that the previously implemented Average Embedded Element (AEE) model still leaves residual polarisations errors of up to 10-20 % in Stokes Q. We present a new simulation-based Full Embedded Element (FEE) model which is the most rigorous realisation yet of the MWA's primary beam model. It enables efficient calculation of the MWA beam response in arbitrary directions without necessity of spatial interpolation. In the new model, every dipole in the MWA tile (4 x 4 bow-tie dipoles) is simulated separately, taking into account all mutual coupling, ground screen and soil effects, and therefore accounts for the different properties of the individual dipoles within a tile. We have applied the FEE beam model to GLEAM observations at 200 - 231 MHz and used false Stokes parameter leakage as a metric to compare the models. We have determined that the FEE model reduced the magnitude and declination-dependent behaviour of false polarisation in Stokes Q and V while retaining low levels of false polarisation in Stokes U.
  • I. Andreoni, K. Ackley, J. Cooke, A. Acharyya, J. R. Allison, G. E. Anderson, M. C. B. Ashley, D. Baade, M. Bailes, K. Bannister, A. Beardsley, M. S. Bessell, F. Bian, P. A. Bland, M. Boer, T. Booler, A. Brandeker, I. S. Brown, D. Buckley, S.-W. Chang, D. M. Coward, S. Crawford, H.Crisp, B. Crosse, A. Cucchiara, M. Cupák, J. S. de Gois, A. Deller, H. A. R. Devillepoix, D. Dobie, E. Elmer, D. Emrich, W. Farah, T. J. Farrell, T. Franzen, B. M. Gaensler, D. K. Galloway, B. Gendre, T. Giblin, A. Goobar, J. Green, P. J. Hancock, B. A. D. Hartig, E. J. Howell, L. Horsley, A. Hotan, R. M. Howie, L. Hu, Y. Hu, C. W. James, S. Johnston, M. Johnston-Hollitt, D. L. Kaplan, M. Kasliwal, E. F. Keane, D. Kenney, A. Klotz, R. Lau, R. Laugier, E. Lenc, X. Li, E. Liang, C. Lidman, L. C. Luvaul, C. Lynch, B. Ma, D. Macpherson, J. Mao, D. E. McClelland, C. McCully, A. Möller, M. F. Morales, D. Morris, T. Murphy, K. Noysena, C. A. Onken, N. B. Orange, S. Oslowski, D. Pallot, J. Paxman, S. B. Potter, T. Pritchard, W. Raja, R. Ridden-Harper, E. Romero-Colmenero, E. M. Sadler, E. K. Sansom, R. A. Scalzo, B. P. Schmidt, S. M. Scott, N. Seghouani, Z. Shang, R. M. Shannon, L. Shao, M. M. Shara, R. Sharp, M. Sokolowski, J. Sollerman, J. Staff, K. Steele, T. Sun, N. B. Suntzeff, C. Tao, S. Tingay, M. C. Towner, P. Thierry, C. Trott, B. E. Tucker, P. Väisänen, V. Venkatraman Krishnan, M. Walker, L. Wang, X. Wang, R. Wayth, M. Whiting, A. Williams, T. Williams, C. Wolf, C. Wu, X. Wu, J. Yang, X. Yuan, H. Zhang, J. Zhou, H. Zovaro
    Oct. 16, 2017 astro-ph.SR, astro-ph.HE
    The discovery of the first electromagnetic counterpart to a gravitational wave signal has generated follow-up observations by over 50 facilities world-wide, ushering in the new era of multi-messenger astronomy. In this paper, we present follow-up observations of the gravitational wave event GW170817 and its electromagnetic counterpart SSS17a/DLT17ck (IAU label AT2017gfo) by 14 Australian telescopes and partner observatories as part of Australian-based and Australian-led research programs. We report early- to late-time multi-wavelength observations, including optical imaging and spectroscopy, mid-infrared imaging, radio imaging, and searches for fast radio bursts. Our optical spectra reveal that the transient source afterglow cooled from approximately 6400K to 2100K over a 7-day period and produced no significant optical emission lines. The spectral profiles, cooling rate, and photometric light curves are consistent with the expected outburst and subsequent processes of a binary neutron star merger. Star formation in the host galaxy probably ceased at least a Gyr ago, although there is evidence for a galaxy merger. Binary pulsars with short (100 Myr) decay times are therefore unlikely progenitors, but pulsars like PSR B1534+12 with its 2.7 Gyr coalescence time could produce such a merger. The displacement (about 2.2 kpc) of the binary star system from the centre of the main galaxy is not unusual for stars in the host galaxy or stars originating in the merging galaxy, and therefore any constraints on the kick velocity imparted to the progenitor are poor.
  • Synchrotron emission pervades the Galactic plane at low radio frequencies, originating from cosmic ray electrons interacting with the Galactic magnetic field. Using a low-frequency radio telescope, the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), we measure the free-free absorption of this Galactic synchrotron emission by intervening HII regions along the line of sight. These absorption measurements allow us to calculate the Galactic cosmic-ray electron emissivity behind and in front of 47 detected HII regions in the region $250^\circ < l < 355^\circ$, $|b| < 2^\circ$. We find that all average emissivities between the HII regions and the Galactic edge along the line of sight ($\epsilon_b$) are in the range of 0.24$\,\,\sim\,\,$0.70$\,\,$K$\,\,$pc$^{-1}$ with a mean of 0.40$\,\,$K$\,\,$pc$^{-1}$ and a variance of 0.10$\,\,$K$\,\,$pc$^{-1}$ at 88$\,\,$MHz. Our best model, the Two-circle model, divides the Galactic disk into three regions using two circles centring on the Galactic centre. It shows a high emissivity region near the Galactic centre, a low emissivity region near the Galactic edge, and a medium emissivity region between these two regions, contrary to the trend found by previous studies.
  • Magnetic fields play a pivotal role in the physics of interstellar medium in galaxies, but there are few observational constraints on how they evolve across cosmic time. Spatially resolved synchrotron polarization maps at radio wavelengths reveal well-ordered large-scale magnetic fields in nearby galaxies that are believed to grow from a seed field via a dynamo effect. To directly test and characterize this theory requires magnetic field strength and geometry measurements in cosmologically distant galaxies, which are challenging to obtain due to the limited sensitivity and angular resolution of current radio telescopes. Here, we report the cleanest measurements yet of magnetic fields in a galaxy beyond the local volume, free of the systematics traditional techniques would encounter. By exploiting the scenario where the polarized radio emission from a background source is gravitationally lensed by a foreground galaxy at z = 0.439 using broadband radio polarization data, we detected coherent $\mu$G magnetic fields in the lensing disk galaxy as seen 4.6 Gyrs ago, with similar strength and geometry to local volume galaxies. This is the highest redshift galaxy whose observed coherent magnetic field property is compatible with a mean-field dynamo origin.
  • We present techniques developed to calibrate and correct Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) low frequency (72-300 MHz) radio observations for polarimetry. The extremely wide field-of-view, excellent instantaneous (u, v)-coverage and sensitivity to degree-scale structure that the MWA provides enable instrumental calibration, removal of instrumental artefacts, and correction for ionospheric Faraday rotation through imaging techniques. With the demonstrated polarimetric capabilities of the MWA, we discuss future directions for polarimetric science at low frequencies to answer outstanding questions relating to polarised source counts, source depolarisation, pulsar science, low-mass stars, exoplanets, the nature of the interstellar and intergalactic media, and the solar environment.
  • We report high spatial resolution observations of the HI 21cm line in the Carina Nebula and the Gum 31 region obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The observations covered $\sim$ 12 deg$^2$ centred on $l= 287.5\deg,b = -1\deg$, achieving an angular resolution of $\sim $ 35 arcseconds. The HI map revealed complex filamentary structures across a wide range of velocities. Several "bubbles" are clearly identified in the Carina Nebula Complex, produced by the impact of the massive star clusters located in this region. An HI absorption profile obtained towards the strong extragalactic radio source PMN J1032--5917 showed the distribution of the cold component of the atomic gas along the Galactic disk, with the Sagittarius-Carina and Perseus spiral arms clearly distinguishable. Preliminary calculations of the optical depth and spin temperatures of the cold atomic gas show that the HI line is opaque ($\tau \gtrsim$ 2) at several velocities in the Sagittarius-Carina spiral arm. The spin temperature is $\sim100$ K in the regions with the highest optical depth, although this value might be lower for the saturated components. The atomic mass budget of Gum 31 is $\sim35 \%$ of the total gas mass. HI self absorption features have molecular counterparts and good spatial correlation with the regions of cold dust as traced by the infrared maps. We suggest that in Gum 31 regions of cold temperature and high density are where the atomic to molecular gas phase transition is likely to be occurring.
  • Supernova remnants (SNRs) are powerful particle accelerators. As a supernova (SN) blast wave propagates through the circumstellar medium (CSM), electrons and protons scatter across the shock and gain energy by entrapment in the magnetic field. The accelerated particles generate further magnetic field fluctuations and local amplification, leading to cosmic ray production. The wealth of data from Supernova 1987A is providing a template of the SN-CSM interaction, and an important guide to the radio detection and identification of core-collapse SNe based on their spectral properties. Thirty years after the explosion, radio observations of SNR 1987A span from 70 MHz to 700 GHz. We review extensive observing campaigns with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), and follow-ups with other radio telescopes. Observations across the radio spectrum indicate rapid changes in the remnant morphology, while current ATCA and ALMA observations show that the SNR has entered a new evolutionary phase.
  • The current generation of experiments aiming to detect the neutral hydrogen signal from the Epoch of Reionisation (EoR) is likely to be limited by systematic effects associated with removing foreground sources from target fields. In this paper we develop a model for the compact foreground sources in one of the target fields of the MWA's EoR key science experiment: the `EoR1' field. The model is based on both the MWA's GLEAM survey and GMRT 150 MHz data from the TGSS survey, the latter providing higher angular resolution and better astrometric accuracy for compact sources than is available from the MWA alone. The model contains 5049 sources, some of which have complicated morphology in MWA data, Fornax A being the most complex. The higher resolution data show that 13% of sources that appear point-like to the MWA have complicated morphology such as double and quad structure, with a typical separation of 33~arcsec. We derive an analytic expression for the error introduced into the EoR two-dimensional power spectrum due to peeling close double sources as single point sources and show that for the measured source properties, the error in the power spectrum is confined to high $k_\bot$ modes that do not affect the overall result for the large-scale cosmological signal of interest. The brightest ten mis-modelled sources in the field contribute 90% of the power bias in the data, suggesting that it is most critical to improve the models of the brightest sources. With this hybrid model we reprocess data from the EoR1 field and show a maximum of 8% improved calibration accuracy and a factor of two reduction in residual power in $k$-space from peeling these sources. Implications for future EoR experiments including the SKA are discussed in relation to the improvements obtained.
  • Most massive stars end their lives in core-collapse supernova explosions and enrich the interstellar medium with explosively nucleosynthesized elements. Following core collapse, the explosion is subject to instabilities as the shock propagates outwards through the progenitor star. Observations of the composition and structure of the innermost regions of a core-collapse supernova provide a direct probe of the instabilities and nucleosynthetic products. SN 1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is one of very few supernovae for which the inner ejecta can be spatially resolved but are not yet strongly affected by interaction with the surroundings. Our observations of SN 1987A with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) are of the highest resolution to date and reveal the detailed morphology of cold molecular gas in the innermost regions of the remnant. The 3D distributions of carbon and silicon monoxide (CO and SiO) emission differ, but both have a central deficit, or torus-like distribution, possibly a result of radioactive heating during the first weeks ("nickel heating"). The size scales of the clumpy distribution are compared quantitatively to models, demonstrating how progenitor and explosion physics can be constrained.
  • We present the results from a broadband (1 to 3 GHz), spectro-polarimetry study of the integrated emission from 100 extragalactic radio sources with the ATCA, selected to be highly linearly polarized at 1.4 GHz. We use a general purpose, polarization model-fitting procedure that describes the Faraday rotation measure (RM) and intrinsic polarization structure of up to three distinct polarized emission regions or 'RM components' of a source. Overall, 37%/52%/11% of sources are best fit by one/two/three RM components. However, these fractions are dependent on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) in polarization (more RM components more likely at higher S/N). In general, our analysis shows that sources with high integrated degrees of polarization at 1.4 GHz have low Faraday depolarization, are typically dominated by a single RM component, have a steep spectral index, and a high intrinsic degree of polarization. After classifying our sample into radiative-mode and jet-mode AGN, we find no significant difference between the Faraday rotation or Faraday depolarization properties of jet-mode and radiative-mode AGN. However, there is a statistically significant difference in the intrinsic degree of polarization between the two types, with the jet-mode sources having more intrinsically ordered magnetic field structures than the radiative-mode sources. We also find a preferred perpendicular orientation of the intrinsic magnetic field structure of jet-mode AGN with respect to the jet direction, while no clear preference is found for the radiative-mode sources.
  • We present low-frequency spectral energy distributions of 60 known radio pulsars observed with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) telescope. We searched the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky MWA (GLEAM) survey images for 200-MHz continuum radio emission at the position of all pulsars in the ATNF pulsar catalogue. For the 60 confirmed detections we have measured flux densities in 20 x 8 MHz bands between 72 and 231 MHz. We compare our results to existing measurements and show that the MWA flux densities are in good agreement.
  • We compare two rotationally invariant decomposition techniques on linear polarisation data: the spin-2 spherical harmonic decomposition in two opposite parities, the $E$- and $B$-mode, and the multiscale analysis of the gradient of linear polarisation, $|\nabla \mathbf{P}|$. We demonstrate that both decompositions have similar properties in the image domain and the spatial frequency domain. They can be used as complementary tools for turbulence analysis of interstellar magnetic fields in order to develop a better understanding of the origin of energy sources for the turbulence, the origin of peculiar magnetic field structures and their underlying physics. We also introduce a new quantity $|\nabla EB|$ based on the $E$- and $B$-modes and we show that in the intermediate and small scales limit $|\nabla EB| \simeq |\nabla \mathbf{P}|$. Analysis of the 2.3 GHz S-band Polarization All Sky Survey (S -PASS) shows many extended coherent filament-like features appearing as 'double-jumps' in the $|\nabla \mathbf{P}|$ map that are correlated with negative and positive filaments of $B$-type polarisation. These local asymmetries between the two polarisation types, $E$ and $B$, of the non-thermal Galactic synchrotron emission have an influence on the $E$- and $B$-mode power spectra analyses. The wavelet-based formalism of the polarisation gradient analysis allows us to locate the position of $E$- or $B$-mode features responsible for the local asymmetries between the two polarisation types. In analysed subregions, the perturbations of the magnetic field are trigged by star clusters associated with HII regions, the Orion-Eridanus superbubble and the North Polar Spur at low Galactic latitude.
  • The S-band Polarisation All-Sky Survey (S-PASS) has observed the entire southern sky using the 64-metre Parkes radio telescope at 2.3GHz with an effective bandwidth of 184MHz. The surveyed sky area covers all declinations $\delta\leq 0^\circ$. To analyse compact sources the survey data have been re-processed to produce a set of 107 Stokes $I$ maps with 10.75arcmin resolution and the large scale emission contribution filtered out. In this paper we use these Stokes $I$ images to create a total intensity southern-sky extragalactic source catalogue at 2.3GHz. The source catalogue contains 23,389 sources and covers a sky area of 16,600deg$^2$, excluding the Galactic plane for latitudes $|b|<10^\circ$. Approximately 8% of catalogued sources are resolved. S-PASS source positions are typically accurate to within 35arcsec. At a flux density of 225mJy the S-PASS source catalogue is more than 95% complete, and $\sim$94% of S-PASS sources brighter than 500mJy beam$^{-1}$ have a counterpart at lower frequencies.
  • We present new radio continuum observations of NGC253 from the Murchison Widefield Array at frequencies between 76 and 227 MHz. We model the broadband radio spectral energy distribution for the total flux density of NGC253 between 76 MHz and 11 GHz. The spectrum is best described as a sum of central starburst and extended emission. The central component, corresponding to the inner 500pc of the starburst region of the galaxy, is best modelled as an internally free-free absorbed synchrotron plasma, with a turnover frequency around 230 MHz. The extended emission component of the NGC253 spectrum is best described as a synchrotron emission flattening at low radio frequencies. We find that 34% of the extended emission (outside the central starburst region) at 1 GHz becomes partially absorbed at low radio frequencies. Most of this flattening occurs in the western region of the SE halo, and may be indicative of synchrotron self-absorption of shock re-accelerated electrons or an intrinsic low-energy cut off of the electron distribution. Furthermore, we detect the large-scale synchrotron radio halo of NGC253 in our radio images. At 154 - 231 MHz the halo displays the well known X-shaped/horn-like structure, and extends out to ~8kpc in z-direction (from major axis).
  • The Fan Region is one of the dominant features in the polarized radio sky, long thought to be a local (distance < 500 pc) synchrotron feature. We present 1.3-1.8 GHz polarized radio continuum observations of the region from the Global Magneto-Ionic Medium Survey (GMIMS) and compare them to maps of Halpha and polarized radio continuum intensity from 0.408-353 GHz. The high-frequency (> 1 GHz) and low-frequency (< 600 MHz) emission have different morphologies, suggesting a different physical origin. Portions of the 1.5 GHz Fan Region emission are depolarized by about 30% by ionized gas structures in the Perseus Arm, indicating that this fraction of the emission originates >2 kpc away. We argue for the same conclusion based on the high polarization fraction at 1.5 GHz (about 40%). The Fan Region is offset with respect to the Galactic plane, covering -5{\deg} < b < +10{\deg}; we attribute this offset to the warp in the outer Galaxy. We discuss origins of the polarized emission, including the spiral Galactic magnetic field. This idea is a plausible contributing factor although no model to date readily reproduces all of the observations. We conclude that models of the Galactic magnetic field should account for the > 1 GHz emission from the Fan Region as a Galactic-scale, not purely local, feature.
  • We present an investigation into the magnetism of the Magellanic Bridge, carried out through the observation of Faraday rotation towards 167 polarized extragalactic radio sources spanning the continuous frequency range of 1.3 - 3.1 GHz with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. Comparing measured Faraday depth values of sources 'on' and 'off' the Bridge, we find that the two populations are implicitly different. Assuming that this difference in populations is due to a coherent field in the Magellanic Bridge, the observed Faraday depths indicate a median line-of-sight coherent magnetic-field strength of $B_{\parallel}\,\simeq\,0.3\,\mu$G directed uniformly away from us. Motivated by the varying magnitude of Faraday depths of sources on the Bridge, we speculate that the coherent field observed in the Bridge is a consequence of the coherent magnetic fields from the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds being pulled into the tidal feature. This is the first observation of a coherent magnetic field spanning the entirety of the Magellanic Bridge and we argue that this is a direct probe of a 'pan-Magellanic' field.