• Based on five years of observations with the 40-foot telescope at Green Bank Observatory (GBO), Reichart & Stephens (2000) found that the radio source Cassiopeia A had either faded more slowly between the mid-1970s and late 1990s than Baars et al. (1977) had found it to be fading between the late 1940s and mid-1970s, or that it had rebrightened and then resumed fading sometime between the mid-1970s and mid-1990s, in L band (1.4 GHz). Here, we present 15 additional years of observations of Cas A and Cyg A with the 40-foot in L band, and three and a half additional years of observations of Cas A, Cyg A, Tau A, and Vir A with GBO's recently refurbished 20-meter telescope in L and X (9 GHz) bands. We also present a more sophisticated analysis of the 40-foot data, and a reanalysis of the Baars et al. (1977) data, which reveals small, but non-negligible differences. We find that overall, between the late 1950s and late 2010s, Cas A faded at an average rate of $0.670 \pm 0.019$ %/yr in L band, consistent with Reichart & Stephens (2000). However, we also find, at the 6.3$\sigma$ credible level, that it did not fade at a constant rate. Rather, Cas A faded at a faster rate through at least the late 1960s, rebrightened (or at least faded at a much slower rate), and then resumed fading at a similarly fast rate by, at most, the late 1990s. Given these differences from the original Baars et al. (1977) analysis, and given the importance of their fitted spectral and temporal models for flux-density calibration in radio astronomy, we update and improve on these models for all four of these radio sources. In doing so, we additionally find that Tau A is fading at a rate of $0.102^{+0.042}_{-0.043}$ %/yr in L band.
  • Hot subdwarf stars (sdO/Bs) are evolved core helium-burning stars with very thin hydrogen envelopes, which can be formed by common envelope ejection. Close sdB binaries with massive white dwarf (WD) companions are potential progenitors of thermonuclear supernovae type Ia (SN~Ia). We discovered such a progenitor candidate as well as a candidate for a surviving companion star, which escapes from the Galaxy. More candidates for both types of objects have been found by crossmatching known sdB stars with proper motion and light curve catalogues. We found 72 sdO/B candidates with high Galactic restframe velocities, 12 of them might be unbound to our Galaxy. Furthermore, we discovered the second-most compact sdB+WD binary known. However, due to the low mass of the WD companion, it is unlikely to be a SN\,Ia progenitor.
  • In the course of the MUCHFUSS project we have recently discovered four radial velocity (RV) variable, hot (Teff $\approx$ 80,000 - 110,000 K) post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Among them, we found the first known RV variable O(He) star, the only second known RV variable PG 1159 close binary candidate, as well as the first two naked (i.e., without planetary nebula (PN)) H-rich post-AGB stars of spectral type O(H) that show significant RV variations. We present a non-LTE spectral analysis of these stars along with one further O(H)-type star whose RV variations were found to be not significant. We also report the discovery of an far-infrared excess in the case of the PG 1159 star. None of the stars in our sample displays nebular emission lines, which can be explained well in terms of a very late thermal pulse evolution in the case of the PG 1159 star. The "missing" PNe around the O(H)-type stars seem strange, since we find that several central stars of PNe have much longer post-AGB times. Besides the non-ejection of a PN, the occurrence of a late thermal pulse, or the re-accretion of the PN in the previous post-AGB evolution offer possible explanations for those stars not harbouring a PN (anymore). In case of the O(He) star J0757 we speculate that it might have been previously part of a compact He transferring binary system. In this scenario, the mass transfer must have stopped after a certain time, leaving behind a low mass close companion that could be responsible for the extreme RV shift of 107.0 $\pm$ 22.0 km/s measured within only 31 min.
  • In the summer of 2012, during a Pulsar Search Collaboratory workshop, two high-school students discovered J1930$-$1852, a pulsar in a double neutron star (DNS) system. Most DNS systems are characterized by short orbital periods, rapid spin periods and eccentric orbits. However, J1930$-$1852 has the longest spin period ($P_{\rm spin}\sim$185 ms) and orbital period ($P_{\rm b}\sim$45 days) yet measured among known, recycled pulsars in DNS systems, implying a shorter than average and/or inefficient recycling period before its companion went supernova. We measure the relativistic advance of periastron for J1930$-$1852, $\dot{\omega}=0.00078$(4) deg/yr, which implies a total mass (M$_{\rm{tot}}=2.59$(4) M$_{\odot}$) consistent with other DNS systems. The $2\sigma$ constraints on M$_{\rm{tot}}$ place limits on the pulsar and companion masses ($m_{\rm p}<1.32$ M$_{\odot}$ and $m_{\rm c}>1.30$ M$_{\odot}$ respectively). J1930$-$1852's spin and orbital parameters challenge current DNS population models and make J1930$-$1852 an important system for further investigation.
  • The project Massive Unseen Companions to Hot Faint Underluminous Stars from SDSS (MUCHFUSS) aims to find sdBs with compact companions like massive white dwarfs, neutron stars or black holes. Here we provide classifications, atmospheric parameters and a complete radial velocity (RV) catalogue containing 1914 single measurements for an sample of 177 hot subluminous stars discovered based on SDSS DR7. 110 stars show significant RV variability, while 67 qualify as candidates. We constrain the fraction of close massive compact companions {of hydrogen-rich hot subdwarfs} in our sample to be smaller than $\sim1.3\%$, which is already close to the theoretical predictions. However, the sample might still contain such binaries with longer periods exceeding $\sim8\,{\rm d}$. We detect a mismatch between the $\Delta RV_{\rm max}$-distribution of the sdB and the more evolved sdOB and sdO stars, which challenges our understanding of their evolutionary connection. Furthermore, irregular RV variations of unknown origin with amplitudes of up to $\sim180\,{\rm km\,s^{-1}}$ on timescales of years, days and even hours have been detected in some He-sdO stars. They might be connected to irregular photometric variations in some cases.
  • Hot subdwarfs (sdBs) are core helium-burning stars, which lost almost their entire hydrogen envelope in the red-giant phase. Since a high fraction of those stars are in close binary systems, common envelope ejection is an important formation channel. We identified a total population of 51 close sdB+WD binaries based on time-resolved spectroscopy and multi-band photometry, derive the WD mass distribution and constrain the future evolution of these systems. Most WDs in those binaries have masses significantly below the average mass of single WDs and a high fraction of them might therefore have helium cores. We found 12 systems that will merge in less than a Hubble time and evolve to become either massive C/O WDs, AM\,CVn systems, RCrB stars or even explode as supernovae type Ia.
  • The project Massive Unseen Companions to Hot Faint Underluminous Stars from SDSS (MUCHFUSS) aims at finding hot subdwarf stars with massive compact companions like massive white dwarfs (M>1.0 M$_\odot$), neutron stars, or stellar-mass black holes. We present orbital and atmospheric parameters and put constraints on the nature of the companions of 12 close hot subdwarf B star (sdB) binaries found in the course of the MUCHFUSS project. The systems show periods between 0.14 and 7.4 days. Three systems most likely have white dwarf companions. SDSS J083006.17+475150.3 is likely to be a rare example of a low-mass helium-core white dwarf. SDSS J095101.28+034757.0 shows an excess in the infrared that probably originates from a third companion in a wide orbit. SDSS J113241.58-063652.8 is the first helium deficient sdO star with a confirmed close companion. This study brings to 142 the number of sdB binaries with orbital periods of less than 30 days and with measured mass functions. We present an analysis of the minimum companion mass distribution and show that it is bimodal. One peak around 0.1 M$_\odot$ corresponds to the low-mass main sequence and substellar companions. The other peak around 0.4 M$_\odot$ corresponds to the white dwarf companions. The derived masses for the white dwarf companions are significantly lower than the average mass for single carbon-oxygen white dwarfs. In a T$_{\rm eff}$-log(g) diagram of sdB+dM companions, we find signs that the sdB components are more massive than the rest of the sample. The full sample was compared to the known population of extremely low-mass white dwarf binaries as well as short-period white dwarfs with main sequence companions. Both samples show a significantly different companion mass distribution. We calculate merger timescales and timescales when the companion will fill its Roche Lobe and the system evolves into a cataclysmic variable.
  • The project Massive Unseen Companions to Hot Faint Underluminous Stars from SDSS (MUCHFUSS) aims at finding hot subdwarf stars (sdBs) with massive compact companions such as white dwarfs, neutron stars, or stellar-mass black holes. In a supplementary programme we obtained time-resolved spectroscopy of known hot subdwarf binary candidates. Here we present orbital solutions of eight close sdB binaries with orbital periods ranging from 0.1 to 10 days, which allow us to derive lower limits on the masses of their companions. Additionally, a dedicated photometric follow-up campaign was conducted to obtain light curves of the reflection-effect binary HS 2043+0615. We are able to constrain the most likely nature of the companions in all cases but one, making use of information derived from photometry and spectroscopy. Four sdBs have white dwarf companions, while another three are orbited by low-mass main sequence stars of spectral type M.
  • Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) are the most important standard candles for measuring the expansion history of the universe. The thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf can explain their observed properties, but neither the progenitor systems nor any stellar remnants have been conclusively identified. Underluminous SN Ia have been proposed to originate from a so-called double-detonation of a white dwarf. After a critical amount of helium is deposited on the surface through accretion from a close companion, the helium is ignited causing a detonation wave that triggers the explosion of the white dwarf itself. We have discovered both shallow transits and eclipses in the tight binary system CD-30 11223 composed of a carbon/oxygen white dwarf and a hot helium star, allowing us to determine its component masses and fundamental parameters. In the future the system will transfer mass from the helium star to the white dwarf. Modelling this process we find that the detonation in the accreted helium layer is sufficiently strong to trigger the explosion of the core. The helium star will then be ejected at so large a velocity that it will escape the Galaxy. The predicted properties of this remnant are an excellent match to the so-called hypervelocity star US 708, a hot, helium-rich star moving at more than 750 km/s, sufficient to leave the Galaxy. The identification of both progenitor and remnant provides a consistent picture of the formation and evolution of underluminous type Ia supernovae.
  • We announce the discovery of a new eclipsing hot subdwarf B + M dwarf binary, EC 10246-2707, and present multi-colour photometric and spectroscopic observations of this system. Similar to other HW Vir-type binaries, the light curve shows both primary and secondary eclipses, along with a strong reflection effect from the M dwarf; no intrinsic light contribution is detected from the cool companion. The orbital period is 0.1185079936 +/- 0.0000000009 days, or about three hours. Analysis of our time-series spectroscopy reveals a velocity semi-amplitude of K_1 = 71.6 +/- 1.7 km/s for the sdB and best-fitting atmospheric parameters of Teff = 28900 +/- 500 K, log g = 5.64 +/- 0.06, and log[N(He)/N(H)] = -2.5 +/- 0.2. Although we cannot claim a unique solution from modeling the light curve, the best-fitting model has an sdB mass of 0.45 Msun and a cool companion mass of 0.12 Msun. These results are roughly consistent with a canonical-mass sdB and M dwarf separated by a ~ 0.84 Rsun. We find no evidence of pulsations in the light curve and limit the amplitude of rapid photometric oscillations to < 0.08%. Using 15 years of eclipse timings, we construct an O-C diagram but find no statistically significant period changes; we rule out |P-dot| > 7.2 x 10^(-12). If EC 10246-2707 evolves into a cataclysmic variable, its period should fall below the famous CV period gap.
  • We report the discovery of an extremely close, eclipsing binary system. A white dwarf is orbited by a core He-burning compact hot subdwarf star with a period as short as $\simeq0.04987 {\rm d}$ making this system the most compact hot subdwarf binary discovered so far. The subdwarf will start to transfer helium-rich material on short timescales of less than $50 {\rm Myr}$. The ignition of He-burning at the surface may trigger carbon-burning in the core although the WD is less massive than the Chandrasekhar limit ($>0.74\,M_{\rm \odot}$) making this binary a possible progenitor candidate for a supernova type Ia event.
  • The project Massive Unseen Companions to Hot Faint Underluminous Stars from SDSS (MUCHFUSS) aims at finding hot subdwarf stars with massive compact companions (white dwarfs with masses $M>1.0 {\rm M_{\odot}}$, neutron stars or black holes). The existence of such systems is predicted by binary evolution calculations and some candidate systems have been found. We identified $\simeq1100$ hot subdwarf stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Stars with high velocities have been reobserved and individual SDSS spectra have been analysed. About 70 radial velocity variable subdwarfs have been selected as good candidates for follow-up time resolved spectroscopy to derive orbital parameters and photometric follow-up to search for features like eclipses in the light curves. Up to now we found nine close binary sdBs with short orbital periods ranging from $\simeq0.07 {\rm d}$ to $1.5 {\rm d}$. Two of them are eclipsing binaries with companions that are most likely of substellar nature.
  • The project Massive Unseen Companions to Hot Faint Underluminous Stars from SDSS (MUCHFUSS) aims at finding hot subdwarf stars with massive compact companions (massive white dwarfs M>1.0 Msun, neutron stars or stellar mass black holes). The existence of such systems is predicted by binary evolution theory and some candidate systems have been found. We classified about 1400 hot subdwarf stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) by colour selection and visual inspection of their spectra. Stars with high velocities have been reobserved and individual SDSS spectra have been analysed. In total 201 radial velocity variable subdwarfs have been discovered and about 140 of them have been selected as good candidates for follow-up time resolved spectroscopy to derive their orbital parameters and photometric follow-up to search for features like eclipses in the light curves. Up to now we found seven close binary sdBs with short orbital periods ranging from 0.21 d to 1.5 d and two eclipsing binaries with companions that are most likely of substellar nature. A new pulsating sdB in a close binary system has been discovered as well.
  • The project Massive Unseen Companions to Hot Faint Underluminous Stars from SDSS (MUCHFUSS) aims at finding sdBs with compact companions like supermassive white dwarfs (M>1.0 Msun), neutron stars or black holes. The existence of such systems is predicted by binary evolution theory and recent discoveries indicate that they are likely to exist in our Galaxy. A determination of the orbital parameters is sufficient to put a lower limit on the companion mass by calculating the binary mass function. If this lower limit exceeds the Chandrasekhar mass and no sign of a companion is visible in the spectra, the existence of a massive compact companion is proven without the need for any additional assumptions. We identified about 1100 hot subdwarf stars from the SDSS by colour selection and visual inspection of their spectra. Stars with high velocities have been reobserved and individual SDSS spectra have been analysed. In total 127 radial velocity variable subdwarfs have been discovered. Binaries with high RV shifts and binaries with moderate shifts within short timespans have the highest probability of hosting massive compact companions. Atmospheric parameters of 69 hot subdwarfs in these binary systems have been determined by means of a quantitative spectral analysis. The atmospheric parameter distribution of the selected sample does not differ from previously studied samples of hot subdwarfs. The systems are considered the best candidates to search for massive compact companions by follow-up time resolved spectroscopy.
  • Hot subdwarf B stars (sdBs) are extreme horizontal branch stars believed to originate from close binary evolution. Indeed about half of the known sdB stars are found in close binaries with periods ranging from a few hours to a few days. The enormous mass loss required to remove the hydrogen envelope of the red-giant progenitor almost entirely can be explained by common envelope ejection. A rare subclass of these binaries are the eclipsing HW Vir binaries where the sdB is orbited by a dwarf M star. Here we report the discovery of an HW Vir system in the course of the MUCHFUSS project. A most likely substellar object ($\simeq0.068\,M_{\rm \odot}$) was found to orbit the hot subdwarf J08205+0008 with a period of 0.096 days. Since the eclipses are total, the system parameters are very well constrained. J08205+0008 has the lowest unambiguously measured companion mass yet found in a subdwarf B binary. This implies that the most likely substellar companion has not only survived the engulfment by the red-giant envelope, but also triggered its ejection and enabled the sdB star to form. The system provides evidence that brown dwarfs may indeed be able to significantly affect late stellar evolution.
  • We give a brief review over the observational evidence for close substellar companions to hot subdwarf stars. The formation of these core helium-burning objects requires huge mass loss of their red giant progenitors. It has been suggested that besides stellar companions substellar objects in close orbits may be able to trigger this mass loss. Such objects can be easily detected around hot subdwarf stars by medium or high resolution spectroscopy with an RV accuracy at the km/s-level. Eclipsing systems of HW Vir type stick out of transit surveys because of their characteristic light curves. The best evidence that substellar objects in close orbits around sdBs exist and that they are able to trigger the required mass loss is provided by the eclipsing system SDSS J0820+0008, which was found in the course of the MUCHFUSS project. Furthermore, several candidate systems have been discovered.
  • The project Massive Unseen Companions to Hot Faint Underluminous Stars from SDSS (MUCHFUSS) aims at finding hot subdwarf stars with massive compact companions like massive white dwarfs (M > 1.0 Msun), neutron stars or stellar mass black holes. The existence of such systems is predicted by binary evolution theory and recent discoveries indicate that they exist in our Galaxy. First results are presented for seven close binary sdBs with short orbital periods ranging from 0.21 d to 1.5 d. The atmospheric parameters of all objects are compatible with core helium-burning stars. The companions are most likely white dwarfs. In one case the companion could be shown to be a white dwarf by the absence of light-curve variations. However, in most cases late type main sequence stars cannot be firmly excluded. Comparing our small sample with the known population of close sdB binaries we show that our target selection method aiming at massive companions is efficient. The minimum companion masses of all binaries in our sample are high compared to the reference sample of known sdB binaries.
  • We present the discovery of photometric variations in the carbon-dominated atmosphere (hot DQ) white dwarf star SDSS J133710.19-002643.6. We find evidence for two low-amplitude, harmonically-related periodicities at 169 s and 339 s, making it the fastest and smallest amplitude of the four known hot DQ variables and the only variable whose spectrum suggests the presence of hydrogen. The star's fundamental and harmonic amplitudes are roughly equal, and its pulse shape is similar to the other two members of the class with detected harmonics. Like the other variables, it appears relatively stable in frequency and amplitude.
  • We constrain the distribution of calcium across the surface of the white dwarf star G29-38 by combining time series spectroscopy from Gemini-North with global time series photometry from the Whole Earth Telescope. G29-38 is actively accreting metals from a known debris disk. Since the metals sink significantly faster than they mix across the surface, any inhomogeneity in the accretion process will appear as an inhomogeneity of the metals on the surface of the star. We measure the flux amplitudes and the calcium equivalent width amplitudes for two large pulsations excited on G29-38 in 2008. The ratio of these amplitudes best fits a model for polar accretion of calcium and rules out equatorial accretion.
  • We have discovered periodic variations in the light curves of two hot DQ stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, SDSS J220029.08-074121.5 and SDSS J234843.30-094245.3. These are the second and third variables detected among the hot DQs and confirm the existence of a new class of variable white dwarf stars. The amplitudes of the variations are one half as large as those detected in the first discovered variable, SDSS J142625.71+575218.3, and required high signal-to-noise photometry to detect. The pulse shapes of the stars are not like those of known white dwarf pulsators but are similar to the first hot DQ variable, SDSS J142625.71+575218.3.