• Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe) constitute an ideal astrophysical environment to test our current understanding of relativistic plasma processes. It is well known that magnetic fields play a crucial role in their dynamics and emission properties. At present, one of the main issues concerns the level of magnetic turbulence present in these systems, which in the absence of space resolved X-ray polarization measures cannot be directly constrained. In this work we investigate, for the first time using simulated synchrotron maps, the effect of a small scale fluctuating component of the magnetic field on the emission properties in X-ray. We illustrate how to include the effects of a turbulent component in standard emission models for PWNe, and which consequences are expected in terms of net emissivity and depolarization, showing that the X-ray surface brightness maps can provide already some rough constraints. We then apply our analysis to the Crab and Vela nebulae and, by comparing our model with Chandra and Vela data, we found that the typical energies in the turbulent component of the magnetic field are about 1.5 to 3 times the one in the ordered field.
  • In the last decade, the relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modelling of pulsar wind nebulae, and of the Crab nebula in particular, has been highly successful, with many of the observed dynamical and emission properties reproduced down to the finest detail. Here, we critically discuss the results of some of the most recent studies: namely the investigation of the origin of the radio emitting particles and the quest for the acceleration sites of particles of different energies along the termination shock, by using wisps motion as a diagnostic tool; the study of the magnetic dissipation process in high magnetization nebulae by means of new long-term three-dimensional simulations of the pulsar wind nebula evolution; the investigation of the relativistic tearing instability in thinning current sheets, leading to fast reconnection events that might be at the origin of the Crab nebula gamma-ray flares.
  • The dynamics, energetics and evolution of pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) and supernova remnants (SNRs), are strongly affected by their magnetic field strength and distribution. They are usually strong, extended, sources of non-thermal X-ray radiation, producing intrinsically polarised radiation. The energetic wind around pulsars produces a highly-magnetised, structured flow, often displaying a jet and a torus and different features (i.e. wisps, knots). This magnetic-dominant wind evolves as it moves away from the pulsar magnetosphere to the surrounding large-scale nebula, becoming kinetic-dominant. Basic aspects such how this conversion is produced, or how the jets and torus are formed, as well as the level of turbulence in the nebula are still unknown. Likewise, the processes ruling the acceleration of particles in shell-like SNRs up to 1e15 eV, including the amplification of the magnetic field, are not clear yet. Imaging polarimetry in this regard is crucial to localise the regions of shock acceleration and to measure the strength and the orientation of the magnetic field at these emission sites. X-ray polarimetry with the X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer (XIPE) will allow the understanding of the magnetic field structure and intensity on different regions in SNRs and PWNe, helping to unveil long-standing questions such as i.e. acceleration of cosmic rays in SNRs or magnetic-to-kinetic energy transfer. SNRs and PWNe also represent the largest population of Galactic very-high energy gamma-ray sources, therefore the study of their magnetic distribution with XIPE will provide fundamental ingredients on the investigation of those sources at very high energies. We will discuss the physics case related to SNRs and PWNe and the expectations of the XIPE observations of some of the most prominent SNRs and PWNe.