• The dream of room temperature superconductors has inspired intense research effort to find routes for enhancing the superconducting transition temperature (Tc). Therefore, single-layer FeSe on a SrTiO3 substrate, with its extraordinarily high Tc amongst all interfacial superconductors and iron based superconductors, is particularly interesting, but the mechanism underlying its high Tc has remained mysterious. Here we show through isotope effects that electrons in FeSe couple with the oxygen phonons in the substrate, and the superconductivity is enhanced linearly with the coupling strength atop the intrinsic superconductivity of heavily-electron-doped FeSe. Our observations solve the enigma of FeSe/SrTiO3, and experimentally establish the critical role and unique behavior of electron-phonon forward scattering in a correlated high-Tc superconductor. The effective cooperation between interlayer electron-phonon interactions and correlations suggests a path forward in developing more high-Tc interfacial superconductors, and may shed light on understanding the high Tc of bulk high temperature superconductors with layered structures.
  • In the iron-based superconductors, understanding the relation between superconductivity and electronic structure upon doping is crucial for exploring the pairing mechanism. Recently it was found that in iron selenide (FeSe), enhanced superconductivity (Tc over 40K) can be achieved via electron doping, with the Fermi surface only comprising M-centered electron pockets. Here by utilizing surface potassium dosing, scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we studied the electronic structure and superconductivity of (Li0.8Fe0.2OH)FeSe in the deep electron-doped regime. We find that a {\Gamma}-centered electron band, which originally lies above the Fermi level (EF), can be continuously tuned to cross EF and contribute a new electron pocket at {\Gamma}. When this Lifshitz transition occurs, the superconductivity in the M-centered electron pocket is slightly suppressed; while a possible superconducting gap with small size (up to ~5 meV) and a dome-like doping dependence is observed on the new {\Gamma} electron pocket. Upon further K dosing, the system eventually evolves into an insulating state. Our findings provide new clues to understand superconductivity versus Fermi surface topology and the correlation effect in FeSe-based superconductors.
  • Hexagonal FeSe thin films were grown on SrTiO3 substrates and the temperature and thickness dependence of their electronic structures were studied. The hexagonal FeSe is found to be metallic and electron doped, whose Fermi surface consists of six elliptical electron pockets. With decreased temperature, parts of the bands shift downward to high binding energy while some bands shift upwards to EF. The shifts of these bands begin around 300 K and saturate at low temperature, indicating a magnetic phase transition temperature of about 300 K. With increased film thickness, the Fermi surface topology and band structure show no obvious change except some minor quantum size effect. Our paper reports the first electronic structure of hexagonal FeSe, and shows that the possible magnetic transition is driven by large scale electronic structure reconstruction.
  • Here we report the electronic structure of FeS, a recently identified iron-based superconductor. Our high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies show two hole-like ($\alpha$ and $\beta$) and two electron-like ($\eta$ and $\delta$) Fermi pockets around the Brillouin zone center and corner, respectively, all of which exhibit moderate dispersion along $k_z$. However, a third hole-like band ($\gamma$) is not observed, which is expected around the zone center from band calculations and is common in iron-based superconductors. Since this band has the highest renormalization factor and is known to be the most vulnerable to defects, its absence in our data is likely due to defect scattering --- and yet superconductivity can exist without coherent quasiparticles in the $\gamma$ band. This may help resolve the current controversy on the superconducting gap structure of FeS. Moreover, by comparing the $\beta$ bandwidths of various iron chalcogenides, including FeS, FeSe$_{1-x}$S$_x$, FeSe, and FeSe$_{1-x}$ Te$_x$, we find that the $\beta$ bandwidth of FeS is the broadest. However, the band renormalization factor of FeS is still quite large, when compared with the band calculations, which indicates sizable electron correlations. This explains why the unconventional superconductivity can persist over such a broad range of isovalent substitution in FeSe$_{1-x}$Te$_{x}$ and FeSe$_{1-x}$S$_{x}$.
  • Extremely high magnetoresistance (XMR) in the lanthanum monopnictides La$X$ ($X$ = Sb, Bi) has recently attracted interest in these compounds as candidate topological materials. However, their perfect electron-hole compensation provides an alternative explanation, so the possible role of topological surface states requires verification through direct observation. Our angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data reveal multiple Dirac-like surface states near the Fermi level in both materials. Intriguingly, we have observed circular dichroism in both surface and near-surface bulk bands. Thus the spin-orbit coupling-induced orbital and spin angular momentum textures may provide a mechanism to forbid backscattering in zero field, suggesting that surface and near-surface bulk bands may contribute strongly to XMR in La$X$. The extremely simple rock salt structure of these materials and the ease with which high-quality crystals can be prepared suggests that they may be an ideal platform for further investigation of topological matter.
  • (Li0.8Fe0.2)OHFeSe is a newly-discovered intercalated iron-selenide superconductor with a Tc above 40 K, which is much higher than the Tc of bulk FeSe (8 K). Here we report a systematic study of (Li0.8Fe0.2)OHFeSe by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). We observed two kinds of surface terminations, namely FeSe and (Li0.8Fe0.2)OH surfaces. On the FeSe surface, the superconducting state is fully gapped with double coherence peaks, and a vortex core state with split peaks near EF is observed. Through quasi-particle interference (QPI) measurements, we clearly observed intra- and inter-pocket scatterings in between the electron pockets at the M point, as well as some evidence of scattering that connects gamma and M points. Upon applying magnetic field, the QPI intensity of all the scattering channels are found to behave similarly. Furthermore, we studied impurity effects on the superconductivity by investigating intentionally introduced impurities and intrinsic defects. We observed that magnetic impurities such as Cr adatoms can induce in-gap states and suppress superconductivity. However, nonmagnetic impurities such as Zn adatoms do not induce visible in-gap states. Meanwhile, we show that Zn adatoms can induce in-gap states in thick FeSe films, which is believed to have an (s+-)wave pairing symmetry. Our experimental results suggest it is likely that (Li0.8Fe0.2)OHFeSe is a plain s-wave superconductor, whose order parameter has the same sign on all Fermi surface sections.
  • The 122$^{*}$ series of iron-chalcogenide superconductors, for example K$_x$Fe$_{2-y}$Se$_{2}$, only possesses electron Fermi pockets. Their distinctive electronic structure challenges the picture built upon iron pnictide superconductors, where both electron and hole Fermi pockets coexist. However, partly due to the intrinsic phase separation in this family of compounds, many aspects of their behavior remain elusive. In particular, the evolution of the 122$^{*}$ series of iron-chalcogenides with chemical substitution still lacks a microscopic and unified interpretation. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we studied a major fraction of 122$^{*}$ iron-chalcogenides, including the isovalently `doped' K$_x$Fe$_{2-y}$Se$_{2-z}$S$_z$, Rb$_x$Fe$_{2-y}$Se$_{2-z}$Te$_z$ and (Tl,K)$_x$Fe$_{2-y}$Se$_{2-z}$S$_z$. We found that the bandwidths of the low energy Fe \textit{3d} bands in these materials depend on doping; and more crucially, as the bandwidth decreases, the ground state evolves from a metal to a superconductor, and eventually to an insulator, yet the Fermi surface in the metallic phases is unaffected by the isovalent dopants. Moreover, the correlation-driven insulator found here with small band filling may be a novel insulating phase. Our study shows that almost all the known 122$^{*}$-series iron chalcogenides can be understood {\it via} one unifying phase diagram which implies that moderate correlation strength is beneficial for the superconductivity.
  • Various Fe-vacancy orders have been reported in tetragonal Fe1-xSe single crystals and nanowires/nanosheets, which are similar to those found in alkali metal intercalated A1-xFe2-ySe2 superconductors. Here we report the in-situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of Fe-vacancy disordered and ordered phases in FeSe multi-layer thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Low temperature annealed FeSe films are identified to be Fe-vacancy disordered phase and electron doped. Further long-time low temperature anneal can change the Fe-vacancy disordered phase to ordered phase, which is found to be semiconductor/insulator with (root 5) x (root 5) superstructure and can be reversely changed to disordered phase with high temperature anneal. Our results reveal that the disorder-order transition in FeSe thin films can be simply tuned by vacuum anneal and the (root 5) x (root 5) Fe-vacancy ordered phase is more likely the parent phase of FeSe.
  • The electronic structure of FeSe thin films grown on SrTiO3 substrate is studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). We reveal the existence of Dirac cone band dispersions in FeSe thin films thicker than 1 Unit Cell below the nematic transition temperature, whose apex are located -10 meV below Fermi energy. The evolution of Dirac cone electronic structure for FeSe thin films as function of temperature, thickness and cobalt doping is systematically studied. The Dirac cones are found to be coexisted with the nematicity in FeSe, disappear when nematicity is suppressed. Our results provide some indication that the spin degrees of freedom may play some kind of role in the nematicity of FeSe.
  • In FeSe-derived superconductors, the lack of a systematic and clean control on the carrier concentration prevents the comprehensive understanding on the phase diagram and the interplay between different phases. Here by K dosing and angle resolved photoemission study on thick FeSe films and FeSe$_{0.93}$S$_{0.07}$ bulk crystals, the phase diagram of FeSe as a function of electron doping is established, which is extraordinarily different from other Fe-based superconductors. The correlation strength remarkably increases with increasing doping, while an insulting phase emerges in the heavily overdoped regime. Between the nematic phase and the insulating phase, a dome of enhanced superconductivity is observed, with the maximum superconducting transition temperature of 44$\pm$2~K. The enhanced superconductivity is independent of the thickness of FeSe, indicating that it is intrinsic to FeSe. Our findings provide an ideal system with variable doping for understanding the different phases and rich physics in the FeSe family.
  • Sr2IrO4 was predicted to be a high temperature superconductor upon electron doping since it highly resembles the cuprates in crystal structure, electronic structure and magnetic coupling constants. Here we report a scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) study of Sr2IrO4 with surface electron doping by depositing potassium (K) atoms. At the 0.5-0.7 monolayer (ML) K coverage, we observed a sharp, V-shaped gap with about 95% loss of density of state (DOS) at EFand visible coherence peaks. The gap magnitude is 25-30 meV for 0.5-0.6 ML K coverage and it closes around 50 K. These behaviors exhibit clear signature of superconductivity. Furthermore, we found that with increased electron doping, the system gradually evolves from an insulating state to a normal metallic state, via a pseudogap-like state and possible superconducting state. Our data suggest possible high temperature superconductivity in electron doped Sr2IrO4, and its remarkable analogy to the cuprates.
  • Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we revealed the surface electronic structure and superconducting gap of (Li$_{0.8}$Fe$_{0.2}$)OHFeSe, an intercalated FeSe-derived superconductor without antiferromagnetic phase or Fe-vacancy order in the FeSe layers, and with a superconducting transition temperature ($T_c$) $\sim$ 40 K. We found that (Li$_{0.8}$Fe$_{0.2}$)OH layers dope electrons into FeSe layers. The electronic structure of surface FeSe layers in (Li$_{0.8}$Fe$_{0.2}$)OHFeSe resembles that of Rb$_x$Fe$_{2-y}$Se$_2$ except that it only contains half of the carriers due to the polar surface, suggesting similar quasiparticle dynamics between bulk (Li$_{0.8}$Fe$_{0.2}$)OHFeSe and Rb$_x$Fe$_{2-y}$Se$_2$. Superconducting gap is clearly observed below $T_c$, with an isotropic distribution around the electron Fermi surface. Compared with $A_x$Fe$_{2-y}$Se$_2$ (\textit{A}=K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K), the higher $T_c$ in (Li$_{0.8}$Fe$_{0.2}$)OHFeSe might be attributed to higher homogeneity of FeSe layers or to some unknown roles played by the (Li$_{0.8}$Fe$_{0.2}$)OH layers.
  • The electronic structure of Na2Ti2Sb2O, a parent compound of the newly discovered titanium-based oxypnictide superconductors, is studied by photon energy and polarization dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). The obtained band structure and Fermi surface agree well with the band structure calculation of Na2Ti2Sb2O in the non-magnetic state, which indicating that there is no magnetic order in Na2Ti2Sb2O and the electronic correlation is weak. Polarization dependent ARPES results suggest the multi-band and multi-orbital nature of Na2Ti2Sb2O. Photon energy dependent ARPES results suggest that the electronic structure of Na2Ti2Sb2O is rather two-dimensional. Moreover, we find a density wave energy gap forms below the transition temperature and reaches 65 meV at 7 K, indicating that Na2Ti2Sb2O is likely a weakly correlated CDW material in the strong electron-phonon interaction regime.
  • Single-layer FeSe film on SrTiO3(001) was recently found to be the champion of interfacial superconducting systems, with a much enhanced superconductivity than the bulk iron-based superconductors. Its superconducting mechanism is of great interest. Although the film has a simple Fermi surface topology, its pairing symmetry is unsettled. Here by using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we systematically investigated the superconductivity of single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3(001) films. We observed fully gapped tunneling spectrum and magnetic vortex lattice in the film. Quasi-particle interference (QPI) patterns reveal scatterings between and within the electron pockets, and put constraints on possible pairing symmetries. By introducing impurity atoms onto the sample, we show that the magnetic impurities (Cr, Mn) can locally suppress the superconductivity but the non-magnetic impurities (Zn, Ag and K) cannot. Our results indicate that single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 has a plain s-wave paring symmetry whose order parameter has the same phase on all Fermi surface sections.
  • We report the detailed electronic structure of WTe$_2$ by high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Unlike the simple one electron plus one hole pocket type of Fermi surface topology reported before, we resolved a rather complicated Fermi surface of WTe$_2$. Specifically, there are totally nine Fermi pockets, including one hole pocket at the Brillouin zone center $\Gamma$, and two hole pockets and two electron pockets on each side of $\Gamma$ along the $\Gamma$-$X$ direction. Remarkably, we have observed circular dichroism in our photoemission spectra, which suggests that the orbital angular momentum exhibits a rich texture at various sections of the Fermi surface. As reported previously for topological insulators and Rashiba systems, such a circular dichroism is a signature for spin-orbital coupling (SOC). This is further confirmed by our density functional theory calculations, where the spin texture is qualitatively reproduced as the conjugate consequence of SOC. Since the backscattering processes are directly involved with the resistivity, our data suggest that the SOC and the related spin and orbital angular momentum textures may be considered in the understanding of the anomalous magnetoresistance of WTe$_2$.
  • Recently, the non-centrosymmetric bismuth tellurohalides such as BiTeCl are being studied as possible candidates of topological insulators. While some photoemission studies showed that BiTeCl is an inversion asymmetric topological insulator, others showed that it is a normal semiconductor with Rashba splitting. Meanwhile, first-principle calculationsfailed to confirm the existence of topological surface states in BiTeCl so far. Therefore, the topological nature of BiTeCl requires further investigation. Here we report low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy study on the surface states of BiTeCl single crystals. On the tellurium-terminated surfaces with low defect density, strong evidences for topological surface states are found in the quasi-particle interference patterns generated by the scattering of these states, both in the anisotropy of the scattering vectors and the fast decay of the interference near step edges. Meanwhile, on samples with much higher defect densities, we observed surface states that behave differently. Our results help to resolve the current controversy on the topological nature of BiTeCl.
  • We have studied the low-lying electronic structure of a new ThCr$_2$Si$_2$-type superconductor KNi$_2$Se$_2$ with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Three bands intersect the Fermi level, forming complicated Fermi surface topology, which is sharply different from its isostructural superconductor K$_x$Fe$_{2-y}$Se$_2$. The Fermi surface shows weak variation along the $k_z$ direction, indicating its quasi-two-dimensional nature. Further comparison with the density functional theory calculations demonstrates that there exist relatively weak correlations and substantial hybridization of the Ni 3$d$ and the Se 4$p$ orbitals in the low-lying electronic structure. Our results indicate that the large density of states at the Fermi energy leads to the reported mass enhancement based on the specific heat measurements. Moreover, no anomaly is observed in the spectra when entering the fluctuating charge density wave state reported earlier.
  • We report the electronic structure reconstruction of Ca$_{1-x}$Pr$_x$Fe$_2$As$_2$ ($x$ = 0.1 and 0.15) in the low temperature collapsed tetragonal (CT) phase observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Different from Ca(Fe$_{1-x}$Rh$_x$)$_2$As$_2$ and the annealed CaFe$_2$As$_2$ where all hole Fermi surfaces are absent in their CT phases, the cylindrical hole Fermi surface can still be observed in the CT phase of Ca$_{1-x}$Pr$_x$Fe$_2$As$_2$. Furthermore, we found at least three well separated electron-like bands around the zone corner in the CT phase of Ca$_{1-x}$Pr$_x$Fe$_2$As$_2$, which are more dispersive than the electron-like bands in the high temperature tetragonal phase. Based on these observations, we propose that the weakening of correlations (as indicated by the reduced effective mass), rather than the lack of Fermi surface nesting, might be responsible for the absence of magnetic ordering and superconductivity in the CT phase.
  • The correlations between the superconductivity in iron pnictides and their electronic structures are elusive and controversial so far. Here through angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements, we show that such correlations are rather distinct in AFe$_{1-x}$Co$_x$As (A=Li, Na), but only after one realizes that they are orbital selective. We found that the superconductivity is enhanced by the Fermi surface nesting, but only when it is between $d_{xz}/d_{yz}$ Fermi surfaces, while for the $d_{xy}$ orbital, even nearly perfect Fermi surface nesting could not induce superconductivity. Moreover, the superconductivity is completely suppressed just when the $d_{xz}/d_{yz}$ hole pockets sink below Fermi energy and evolve into an electron pocket. Our results thus establish the orbital selective relation between the Fermiology and the superconductivity in iron-based superconductors, and substantiate the critical role of the $d_{xz}/d_{yz}$ orbitals. Furthermore, around the zone center, we found that the $d_{xz}/d_{yz}$-based bands are much less sensitive to impurity scattering than the $d_{xy}$-based band, which explains the robust superconductivity against heavy doping in iron-based superconductors.
  • The diversities in crystal structures and ways of doping result in extremely diversified phase diagrams for iron-based superconductors. With angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we have systematically studied the effects of chemical substitution on the electronic structure of various series of iron-based superconductors. In addition to the control of Fermi surface topology by heterovalent doping, we found two more extraordinary effects of doping: 1. the site and band dependencies of quasiparticle scattering; and more importantly 2. the ubiquitous and significant bandwidth-control by both isovalent and heterovalent dopants in the iron-anion layer. Moreover, we found that the bandwidth-control could be achieved by either applying the chemical pressure or doping electrons, but not by doping holes. Together with other findings provided here, these results complete the microscopic picture of the electronic effects of dopants, which facilitates a unified understanding of the diversified phase diagrams and resolutions to many open issues of various iron-based superconductors.
  • We report the electronic structure of YbB6, a recently predicted moderately correlated topological insulator, measured by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We directly observed linearly dispersive bands around the time-reversal invariant momenta {\Gamma} and X with negligible kz dependence, consistent with odd number of surface states crossing the Fermi level in a Z2 topological insulator. Circular dichroism photoemission spectra suggest that these in-gap states possess chirality of orbital angular momentum, which is related to the chiral spin texture, further indicative of their topological nature. The observed insulating gap of YbB6 is about 100 meV, larger than that reported by theoretical calculations. Our results present strong evidence that YbB6 is a correlated topological insulator and provide a foundation for further studies of this promising material.
  • In the quest for high temperature superconductors, the interface between a metal and a dielectric was proposed to possibly achieve very high superconducting transition temperature ($T_c$) through interface-assisted pairing. Recently, in single layer FeSe (SLF) films grown on SrTiO$_3$ substrates, signs for $T_c$ up to 65~K have been reported. However, besides doping electrons and imposing strain, whether and how the substrate facilitates the superconductivity are still unclear. Here we report the growth of various SLF films on thick BaTiO$_3$ films atop KTaO$_3$ substrates, with signs for $T_c$ up to $75$~K, close to the liquid nitrogen boiling temperature. SLF of similar doping and lattice is found to exhibit high $T_c$ only if it is on the substrate, and its band structure strongly depends on the substrate. Our results highlight the profound role of substrate on the high-$T_c$ in SLF, and provide new clues for understanding its mechanism.
  • The electronic structure of BaTi2As2O, a parent compound of the newly discovered titanium-based oxypnictide superconductors, is studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The electronic structure shows multi-orbital nature and possible three-dimensional character. An anomalous temperature-dependent spectral weight redistribution and broad lineshape indicate the incoherent nature of the spectral function. At the density-wave-like transition temperature around 200 K, a partial gap opens at the Fermi patches. These findings suggest that BaTi2As2O is likely a charge density wave material in the strong interaction regime.
  • With angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we studied the electronic structure of TaFe$_{1.23}$Te$_3$, which is a two-leg spin ladder compound with a novel antiferromagnetic ground state. Quasi-two-dimensional Fermi surface is observed, indicating sizable inter-ladder hopping, which would facilitate the in-plane ferromagnetic ordering through double exchange interactions. Moreover, an energy gap is not observed at the Fermi surface in the antiferromagnetic state. Instead, the shifts of various bands have been observed. Combining these observations with density-functional-theory calculations, we propose that the large scale reconstruction of the electronic structure, caused by the interactions between the coexisting itinerant electrons and local moments, is most likely the driving force behind the magnetic transition. TaFe$_{1.23}$Te$_3$ thus provides a simpler system that contains similar ingredients as the parent compounds of iron-based superconductors, which yet could be readily modeled and understood.
  • Single-layer FeSe films with extremely expanded in-plane lattice constant of 3.99A are fabricated by epitaxially growing FeSe/Nb:SrTiO3/KTaO3 heterostructures, and studied by in situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Two elliptical electron pockets at the Brillion zone corner are resolved with negligible hybridization between them, indicating the symmetry of the low energy electronic structure remains intact as a free-standing single-layer FeSe, although it is on a substrate. The superconducting gap closes at a record high temperature of 70K for the iron based superconductors. Intriguingly, the superconducting gap distribution is anisotropic but nodeless around the electron pockets, with minima at the crossings of the two pockets. Our results put strong constraints on the current theories, and support the coexistence of both even and odd parity spin-singlet pairing channels as classified by the lattice symmetry.