• The XXL survey currently covers two 25 sq. deg. patches with XMM observations of ~10ks. We summarise the scientific results associated with the first release of the XXL data set, that occurred mid 2016. We review several arguments for increasing the survey depth to 40 ks during the next decade of XMM operations. X-ray (z<2) cluster, (z<4) AGN and cosmic background survey science will then benefit from an extraordinary data reservoir. This, combined with deep multi-$\lambda$ observations, will lead to solid standalone cosmological constraints and provide a wealth of information on the formation and evolution of AGN, clusters and the X-ray background. In particular, it will offer a unique opportunity to pinpoint the z>1 cluster density. It will eventually constitute a reference study and an ideal calibration field for the upcoming eROSITA and Euclid missions.
  • Studies of the properties of low-redshift cluster galaxies suffer, in general, from small spatial coverage of the cluster area. WINGS, the most homogeneous and complete study of galaxies in dense environments to date, obtained spectroscopic redshifts for 48 clusters at a median redshift of 0.05, out to an average distance of approximately 0.5 cluster virial radii. The WINGS photometric survey was recently extended by the VST survey OmegaWINGS to cover the outskirts of a subset of the original cluster sample. In this work, we present the spectroscopic follow-up of 33 of the 46 clusters of galaxies observed with VST over 1 square degree. The aim of this spectroscopic survey is to enlarge the number of cluster members and study the galaxy characteristics and the cluster dynamical properties out to large radii, reaching the virial radius and beyond. We used the AAOmega spectrograph at AAT to obtain fiber-integrated spectra covering the wavelength region between 3800 and 9000 A, with a spectral resolution of 3.5-6 A full width at half maximum (FWHM). Observations were performed using two different configurations and exposure times per cluster. We measured redshifts using both absorption and emission lines and used them to derive the cluster redshifts and velocity dispersions. We present here the redshift measurements for 17985 galaxies, 7497 of which turned out to be cluster members. The sample magnitude completeness is 80% at V=20. Thanks to the observing strategy, the radial completeness turned out to be relatively constant (90%) within the AAOmega field of view. The success rate in measuring redshifts is 95%, at all radii. We provide redshifts for the full sample of galaxies in OmegaWINGS clusters together with updated and robust cluster redshift and velocity dispersions. These data will be publicly accessible through the CDS and VO archives.
  • We study the evolution of spectral early-type galaxies in clusters, groups and the field up to redshift 0.9 using the EDisCS dataset. We measure Re, Ie, and sigma for 154 cluster and 68 field galaxies. We study the evolution of the zero point of the fundamental plane (FP) and confirm results in the literature, but now also for the low cluster velocity dispersion regime. The mass-to-light ratio varies as Delta log M/L_B=(-0.54+-0.01)z=(-1.61+-0.01)log(1+z) in clusters, independent of their velocity dispersion. The evolution is stronger (Delta log M/L_B=(-0.76+-0.01)z=(-2.27+-0.03)log(1+z)) for field galaxies. The FP residuals correlate with galaxy mass and become progressively negative at low masses. The effect is visible at z>=0.7 for cluster galaxies and at z>=0.5 for field galaxies. We investigate the size evolution of our galaxy sample. We find that the half-luminosity radius for a galaxy with a dynamical or stellar mass of 2x10^11 Msol varies as (1+z)^{-1.0+-0.3} for both cluster and field galaxies. At the same time, stellar velocity dispersions grow with redshift, as (1+z)^{0.59+-0.10} at constant dynamical mass, and as (1+z)^{0.34+- 0.14} at constant stellar mass. The measured size evolution reduces to Re (1+z)^{-0.5+- 0.2} and sigma (1+z)^{0.41+-0.08}, at fixed dynamical masses, and Re (1+z)^{-0.68+-0.4} and sigma (1+z)^{0.19+-0.10}, at fixed stellar masses, when the progenitor bias (galaxies that locally are of spectroscopic early-type, but not very old, disappear from the EDisCS high-redshift sample; these galaxies tend to be large in size) is taken into account. Taken together, the variations in size and velocity dispersion imply that the luminosity evolution with redshift derived from the zero point of the FP is somewhat milder than that derived without taking these variations into account.
  • The growth of brightest cluster galaxies is closely related to the properties of their host cluster. We present evidence for dry mergers as the dominant source of BCG mass growth at $z\lesssim1$ in the XXL 100 brightest cluster sample. We use the global red sequence, H$\alpha$ emission and mean star formation history to show that BCGs in the sample possess star formation levels comparable to field ellipticals of similar stellar mass and redshift. XXL 100 brightest clusters are less massive on average than those in other X-ray selected samples such as LoCuSS or HIFLUGCS. Few clusters in the sample display high central gas concentration, rendering inefficient the growth of BCGs via star formation resulting from the accretion of cool gas. Using measures of the relaxation state of their host clusters, we show that BCGs grow as relaxation proceeds. We find that the BCG stellar mass corresponds to a relatively constant fraction 1\%\ of the total cluster mass in relaxed systems. We also show that, following a cluster scale merger event, the BCG stellar mass lags behind the expected value from the M$_{cluster}$ - M$_{BCG}$ relation but subsequently accretes stellar mass via dry mergers as the BCG and cluster evolve towards a relaxed state.
  • X-ray extragalactic surveys are ideal laboratories for the study of the evolution and clustering of active galactic nuclei (AGN). The XXL Survey spans two fields of a combined 50 $deg^2$ observed for more than 6Ms with XMM-Newton, occupying the parameter space between deep surveys and very wide area surveys; at the same time it benefits from a wealth of ancillary data. This paper marks the first release of the XXL point source catalogue selected in the 2-10 keV energy band with limiting flux $F_{2-10keV}=4.8\cdot10^{-14}\rm{erg\,s^{-1}\,cm^{-2}}$. We use both public and proprietary data sets to identify the counterparts of the X-ray point-like sources and improved upon the photometric redshift determination for AGN by applying a Random Forest classification trained to identify for each object the optimal photometric redshift model library. We also assign a probability to each source to be a star or an outlier. We model with Bayesian analysis the X-ray spectra assuming a power-law model with the presence of an absorbing medium. We find an average unabsorbed photon index of $\Gamma=1.85$ and average hydrogen column density $\log{N_{H}}=21.07 cm^{-2}$. We find no trend of $\Gamma$ or $N_H$ with redshift and a fraction of 26% absorbed sources ($\log N_{H}>22$). We show that the XXL-1000-AGN number counts extended the number counts of the COSMOS survey to higher fluxes and are fully consistent with the Euclidean expectation. We constrain the intrinsic luminosity function of AGN in the 2-10 keV energy band where the unabsorbed X-ray flux is estimated from the X-ray spectral fit up to z=3. Finally, we demonstrate the presence of a supercluster size structure at redshift 0.14, identified by means of percolation analysis of the XXL-1000-AGN sample. The XXL survey, reaching a medium flux limit and covering a wide area is a stepping stone between current deep fields and planned wide area surveys.
  • This article belongs to the first series of XXL publications. It presents multifibre spectroscopic observations of three 0.55 sq.deg. fields in the XXL Survey, which were selected on the basis of their high density of X-ray-detected clusters. The observations were obtained with the AutoFib2+WYFFOS (AF2) wide-field fibre spectrograph mounted on the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope. The paper first describes the scientific rationale, the preparation, the data reduction, and the results of the observations, and then presents a study of active galactic nuclei (AGN) within three superclusters. We obtained redshifts for 455 galaxies in total, 56 of which are counterparts of X-ray point-like sources. We were able to determine the redshift of the merging supercluster XLSSC-e, which consists of six individual clusters at z~0.43, and we confirmed the redshift of supercluster XLSSC-d at z~0.3. More importantly, we discovered a new supercluster, XLSSC-f, that comprises three galaxy clusters also at z~0.3. We find a significant 2D overdensity of X-ray point-like sources only around the supercluster XLSSC-f. This result is also supported by the spatial (3D) analysis of XLSSC-f, where we find four AGN with compatible spectroscopic redshifts and possibly one more with compatible photometric redshift. In addition, we find two AGN (3D analysis) at the redshift of XLSSC-e, but no AGN in XLSSC-d. Comparing these findings with the optical galaxy overdensity we conclude that the total number of AGN in the area of the three superclusters significantly exceeds the field expectations. The difference in the AGN frequency between the three superclusters cannot be explained by the present study because of small number statistics. Further analysis of a larger number of superclusters within the 50 sq. deg. of the XXL is needed before any conclusions on the effect of the supercluster environment on AGN can be reached.
  • Within a cluster, gravitational effects can lead to the removal of stars from their parent galaxies. Gas hydrodynamical effects can additionally strip gas and dust from galaxies. The properties of the ICL can therefore help constrain the physical processes at work in clusters by serving as a fossil record of the interaction history. The present study is designed to characterise this ICL in a ~10^14 M_odot and z~0.53 cluster of galaxies from imaging and spectroscopic points of view. By applying a wavelet-based method to CFHT Megacam and WIRCAM images, we detect significant quantities of diffuse light. These sources were then spectroscopically characterised with MUSE. MUSE data were also used to compute redshifts of 24 cluster galaxies and search for cluster substructures. An atypically large amount of ICL has been detected in this cluster. Part of the detected diffuse light has a very weak optical stellar component and apparently consists mainly of gas emission, while other diffuse light sources are clearly dominated by old stars. Furthermore, emission lines were detected in several places of diffuse light. Our spectral analysis shows that this emission likely originates from low-excitation parameter gas. The stellar contribution to the ICL is about 2.3x10^9 yrs old even though the ICL is not currently forming a large number of stars. On the other hand, the contribution of the gas emission to the ICL in the optical is much greater than the stellar contribution in some regions, but the gas density is likely too low to form stars. These observations favour ram pressure stripping, turbulent viscous stripping, or supernovae winds as the origin of the large amount of intracluster light. Since the cluster appears not to be in a major merging phase, we conclude that ram pressure stripping is the most plausible process that generates the observed ICL sources.
  • Context. The XXL Survey is the largest survey carried out by the XMM-Newton satellite and covers a total area of 50 square degrees distributed over two fields. It primarily aims at investigating the large-scale structures of the Universe using the distribution of galaxy clusters and active galactic nuclei as tracers of the matter distribution. Aims. This article presents the XXL bright cluster sample, a subsample of 100 galaxy clusters selected from the full XXL catalogue by setting a lower limit of $3\times 10^{-14}\,\mathrm{erg \,s^{-1}cm^{-2}}$ on the source flux within a 1$^{\prime}$ aperture. Methods. The selection function was estimated using a mixture of Monte Carlo simulations and analytical recipes that closely reproduce the source selection process. An extensive spectroscopic follow-up provided redshifts for 97 of the 100 clusters. We derived accurate X-ray parameters for all the sources. Scaling relations were self-consistently derived from the same sample in other publications of the series. On this basis, we study the number density, luminosity function, and spatial distribution of the sample. Results. The bright cluster sample consists of systems with masses between $M_{500}=7\times 10^{13}$ and $3\times 10^{14} M_\odot$, mostly located between $z=0.1$ and 0.5. The observed sky density of clusters is slightly below the predictions from the WMAP9 model, and significantly below the predictions from the Planck 2015 cosmology. In general, within the current uncertainties of the cluster mass calibration, models with higher values of $\sigma_8$ and/or $\Omega_m$ appear more difficult to accommodate. We provide tight constraints on the cluster differential luminosity function and find no hint of evolution out to $z\sim1$. We also find strong evidence for the presence of large-scale structures in the XXL bright cluster sample and identify five new superclusters.
  • The XXL Survey is the largest homogeneous and contiguous survey carried out with XMM-Newton. Covering an area of 50 square degrees distributed over two fields, it primarily investigates the large-scale structures of the Universe using the distribution of galaxy clusters and active galactic nuclei as tracers of the matter distribution. Given its depth and sky coverage, XXL is particularly suited to systematically unveiling the clustering of X-ray clusters and to identifying superstructures in a homogeneous X-ray sample down to the typical mass scale of a local massive cluster. A friends-of-friends algorithm in three-dimensional physical space was run to identify large-scale structures. In this paper we report the discovery of the highest redshift supercluster of galaxies found in the XXL Survey. We describe the X-ray properties of the clusters members of the structure and the optical follow-up. The newly discovered supercluster is composed of six clusters of galaxies at a median redshift z around 0.43 and distributed across approximately 30 by 15 arc minutes (10 by 5 Mpc on sky) on the sky. This structure is very compact with all the clusters residing in one XMM pointing; for this reason this is the first supercluster discovered with the XXL Survey. Spectroscopic follow-up with WHT (William Herschel Telescope) and NTT (New Technology Telescope) confirmed a median redshift of z = 0.43. An estimate of the X-ray mass and luminosity of this supercluster and of its total gas mass put XLSSC-e at the average mass range of superclusters; its appearance, with two members of equal size, is quite unusual with respect to other superclusters and provides a unique view of the formation process of a massive structure.
  • We give an overview of the Grism Lens Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS), a large Hubble Space Telescope program aimed at obtaining grism spectroscopy of the fields of ten massive clusters of galaxies at redshift z=0.308-0.686, including the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF). The Wide Field Camera 3 yields near infrared spectra of the cluster cores, covering the wavelength range 0.81-1.69mum through grisms G102 and G141, while the Advanced Camera for Surveys in parallel mode provides G800L spectra of the infall regions of the clusters. The WFC3 spectra are taken at two almost orthogonal position angles in order to minimize the effects of confusion. After summarizing the scientific drivers of GLASS, we describe the sample selection as well as the observing strategy and data processing pipeline. We then utilize MACSJ0717.5+3745, a HFF cluster and the first one observed by GLASS, to illustrate the data quality and the high-level data products. Each spectrum brighter than H_AB=23 is visually inspected by at least two co-authors and a redshift is measured when sufficient information is present in the spectra. Furthermore, we conducted a thorough search for emission lines through all the GLASS WFC3 spectra with the aim of measuring redshifts for sources with continuum fainter than H_AB=23. We provide a catalog of 139 emission-line based spectroscopic redshifts for extragalactic sources, including three new redshifts of multiple image systems (one probable, two tentative). In addition to the data itself we also release software tools that are helpful to navigate the data.
  • The Wide-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) is a wide-field multi-wavelength survey of X-ray selected clusters at z =0.04-0.07. The original 34'x34' WINGS field-of- view has now been extended to cover a 1 sq.deg field with both photometry and spectroscopy. In this paper we present the Johnson B and V-band OmegaCAM/VST observations of 46 WINGS clusters, together with the data reduction, data quality and Sextractor photometric catalogs. With a median seeing of 1arcs in both bands, our 25-minutes exposures in each band typically reach the 50% completeness level at V=23.1 mag. The quality of the astrometric and photometric accuracy has been verified by comparison with the 2MASS as well as with SDSS astrometry, and SDSS and previous WINGS imaging. Star/galaxy separation and sky-subtraction procedure have been tested comparing with previous WINGS data. The Sextractor photometric catalogues are publicly available at the CDS, and will be included in the next release of the WINGS database on the VO together with the OmegaCAM reduced images. These data form the basis for a large ongoing spectroscopic campaign with AAOmega/AAT and is being employed for a variety of studies. [abridged]
  • N. Benitez, R. Dupke, M. Moles, L. Sodre, J. Cenarro, A. Marin-Franch, K. Taylor, D. Cristobal, A. Fernandez-Soto, C. Mendes de Oliveira, J. Cepa-Nogue, L.R. Abramo, J.S. Alcaniz, R. Overzier, C. Hernandez-Monteagudo, E. J. Alfaro, A. Kanaan, J. M. Carvano, R.R.R. Reis, E. Martinez Gonzalez, B. Ascaso, F. Ballesteros, H.S. Xavier, J. Varela, A. Ederoclite, H. Vazquez Ramio, T. Broadhurst, E. Cypriano, R. Angulo, J. M. Diego, A. Zandivarez, E. Diaz, P. Melchior, K. Umetsu, P. F. Spinelli, A. Zitrin, D. Coe, G. Yepes, P. Vielva, V. Sahni, A. Marcos-Caballero, F. Shu Kitaura, A. L. Maroto, M. Masip, S. Tsujikawa, S. Carneiro, J. Gonzalez Nuevo, G. C. Carvalho, M. J. Reboucas, J. C. Carvalho, E. Abdalla, A. Bernui, C. Pigozzo, E.G.M. Ferreira, N. Chandrachani Devi, C.A.P. Bengaly Jr., M. Campista, A. Amorim, N. V. Asari, A. Bongiovanni, S. Bonoli, G. Bruzual, N. Cardiel, A. Cava, R. Cid Fernandes, P. Coelho, A. Cortesi, R. G. Delgado, L. Diaz Garcia, J. M. R. Espinosa, E. Galliano, J. I. Gonzalez-Serrano, J. Falcon-Barroso, J. Fritz, C. Fernandes, J. Gorgas, C. Hoyos, Y. Jimenez-Teja, J. A. Lopez-Aguerri, C. Lopez-San Juan, A. Mateus, A. Molino, P. Novais, A. OMill, I. Oteo, P.G. Perez-Gonzalez, B. Poggianti, R. Proctor, E. Ricciardelli, P. Sanchez-Blazquez, T. Storchi-Bergmann, E. Telles, W. Schoennell, N. Trujillo, A. Vazdekis, K. Viironen, S. Daflon, T. Aparicio-Villegas, D. Rocha, T. Ribeiro, M. Borges, S. L. Martins, W. Marcolino, D. Martinez-Delgado, M.A. Perez-Torres, B.B.Siffert, M.O.Calvao, M.Sako, R.Kessler, A. Alvarez-Candal, M. De Pra, F.Roig, D.Lazzaro, J.Gorosabel, R.Lopes de Oliveira, G.B.Lima-Neto, J.Irwin, J.F.Liu, E. Alvarez, I.Balmes, S.Chueca, M.V. Costa-Duarte, A.A.da Costa, M.L.L. Dantas, A.Y.Diaz, J. Fabregat, F. Ferrari, B.Gavela, S. G. Gracia, N. Gruel, J. L. L. Gutierrez, R. Guzman, J. D. Hernandez-Fernandez, D. Herranz, L. Hurtado-Gil, F. Jablonsky, R. Laporte, L.L. Le Tiran, J Licandro, M. Lima, E. Martin, V. Martinez, J. J. C. Montero, P. Penteado, C.B. Pereira, V. Peris, V. Quilis, M. Sanchez-Portal, A. C. Soja, E. Solano, J. Torra, L. Valdivielso
    March 20, 2014 astro-ph.CO
    The Javalambre-Physics of the Accelerated Universe Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS) is a narrow band, very wide field Cosmological Survey to be carried out from the Javalambre Observatory in Spain with a purpose-built, dedicated 2.5m telescope and a 4.7 sq.deg. camera with 1.2Gpix. Starting in late 2015, J-PAS will observe 8500sq.deg. of Northern Sky and measure $0.003(1+z)$ photo-z for $9\times10^7$ LRG and ELG galaxies plus several million QSOs, sampling an effective volume of $\sim 14$ Gpc$^3$ up to $z=1.3$ and becoming the first radial BAO experiment to reach Stage IV. J-PAS will detect $7\times 10^5$ galaxy clusters and groups, setting constrains on Dark Energy which rival those obtained from its BAO measurements. Thanks to the superb characteristics of the site (seeing ~0.7 arcsec), J-PAS is expected to obtain a deep, sub-arcsec image of the Northern sky, which combined with its unique photo-z precision will produce one of the most powerful cosmological lensing surveys before the arrival of Euclid. J-PAS unprecedented spectral time domain information will enable a self-contained SN survey that, without the need for external spectroscopic follow-up, will detect, classify and measure $\sigma_z\sim 0.5\%$ redshifts for $\sim 4000$ SNeIa and $\sim 900$ core-collapse SNe. The key to the J-PAS potential is its innovative approach: a contiguous system of 54 filters with $145\AA$ width, placed $100\AA$ apart over a multi-degree FoV is a powerful "redshift machine", with the survey speed of a 4000 multiplexing low resolution spectrograph, but many times cheaper and much faster to build. The J-PAS camera is equivalent to a 4.7 sq.deg. "IFU" and it will produce a time-resolved, 3D image of the Northern Sky with a very wide range of Astrophysical applications in Galaxy Evolution, the nearby Universe and the study of resolved stellar populations.
  • The Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) is a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Large Program, which will obtain 140 orbits of grism spectroscopy of the core and infall regions of 10 galaxy clusters, selected to be among the very best cosmic telescopes. Extensive HST imaging is available from many sources including the CLASH and Frontier Fields programs. We introduce the survey by analyzing spectra of faint multiply-imaged galaxies and $z\gtrsim6$ galaxy candidates obtained from the first seven orbits out of fourteen targeting the core of the Frontier Fields cluster MACS0717.5+3745. Using the G102 and G141 grisms to cover the wavelength range 0.8-1.7$\mu$m, we confirm 4 strongly lensed systems by detecting emission lines in each of the images. For the 9 $z\gtrsim6$ galaxy candidates clear from contamination, we do not detect any emission lines down to a seven-orbit 1$\sigma$ noise level of $\sim$5$\times$10$^{-18}$erg s$^{-1}$cm$^{-2}$. Taking lensing magnification into account, our flux sensitivity reaches $\sim$0.2-5$\times$10$^{-18}$erg s$^{-1}$cm$^{-2}$. These limits over an uninterrupted wavelength range rule out the possibility that the high-$z$ galaxy candidates are instead strong line emitters at lower redshift. These results show that by means of careful modeling of the background - and with the assistance of lensing magnification - interesting flux limits can be reached for large numbers of objects, avoiding pre-selection and the wavelength restrictions inherent to ground-based multi-slit spectroscopy. These observations confirm the power of slitless HST spectroscopy even in fields as crowded as a cluster core.
  • This paper belongs to a series presenting the WIde Field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS). The WINGS project has collected wide-field, optical (B,V) and near-infrared (J,K) imaging, as well as medium resolution spectroscopy of galaxies in a sample of 76 X-ray selected nearby clusters (0.04 < z < 0.07), with the aim of establishing a reference sample for evolutionary studies of galaxies and galaxy clusters. In this paper we present the U-band photometry of galaxies and stars in the fields of 17 clusters of the WINGS sample. We also extend to a larger field of view the original B- and V-band photometry (WINGS-OPT) for 9 and 6 WINGS clusters, respectively. We use both the new and the already existing B-band photometry to get reliable (U-B) colors of galaxies within three fixed apertures in kpc. To this aim, in the reduction procedure we put particular care in the astrometric precision. Since not all the observations have been taken in good transparency conditions, the photometric calibration was partly obtained relying on the SDSS and WINGS-OPT photometry for the U- and optical bands, respectively. We provide U-band (also B- and V-band, where possible) total magnitudes of stars and galaxies in the fields of clusters. Just for galaxies, the catalogs also provide geometrical parameters and carefully centered aperture magnitudes. The internal consistency of magnitudes has been checked for clusters imaged with different cameras, while the external photometric consistency has been obtained comparing with the WINGS-OPT and SDSS surveys. The photometric catalogs presented here add the U-band information to the WINGS database for extending the SED of the galaxies, in particular in the UV wavelengths which are fundamental for deriving the SFR properties.
  • Aimed at understanding the evolution of galaxies in clusters, the GLACE survey is mapping a set of optical lines ([OII]3727, [OIII]5007, Hbeta and Halpha/[NII] when possible) in several galaxy clusters at redshift around 0.40, 0.63 and 0.86, using the Tuneable Filters (TF) of the OSIRIS instrument (Cepa et al. 2005) at the 10.4m GTC telescope. This study will address key questions about the physical processes acting upon the infalling galaxies during the course of hierarchical growth of clusters. GLACE is already ongoing: we present some preliminary results on our observations of the galaxy cluster Cl0024+1654 at z = 0.395; on the other hand, GLACE@0.86 has been approved as ESO/GTC large project to be started in 2011.
  • This paper reports the results obtained on the photometric redshifts measurement and accuracy, and cluster tomography in the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS) fields. Photometric redshifts were computed using two independent codes (Hyperz and G. Rudnick's code). The accuracy of photometric redshifts was assessed by comparing our estimates with the spectroscopic redshifts of ~1400 galaxies in the 0.3<z<1.0 domain. The accuracy for galaxies fainter than the spectroscopic control sample was estimated using a degraded version of the photometric catalog for the spectroscopic sample. The accuracy of photometric redshifts is typically sigma(Delta z/(1+z)) ~ 0.05+/-0.01, depending on the field, the filter set, and the spectral type of the galaxies. The quality of the photometric redshifts degrades by a factor of two in sigma(Delta z/(1+z)) between the brightest (I~22) and the faintest (I~24-24.5) galaxies in the EDisCS sample. The photometric determination of cluster redshifts in the EDisCS fields using a simple algorithm based on photoz is in excellent agreement with the spectroscopic values (delta(z) ~0.03-0.04 in the high-z sample and ~0.05 in the low-z sample). We also developed a method that uses both photz codes jointly to reject interlopers at magnitudes fainter than the spectroscopic limit. When applied to the spectroscopic sample, this method rejects ~50-90% of all spectroscopically confirmed non-members, while retaining at least 90% of all confirmed members. Photometric redshifts are found to be particularly useful for the identification and study of clusters of galaxies in large surveys. They enable efficient and complete pre-selection of cluster members for spectroscopy, allow accurate determinations of the cluster redshifts, and provide a means of determining cluster membership. (Abridged)
  • Spitzer-MIPS 24 micron and ground-based observations of the rich galaxy cluster Abell 851 at z=0.41 are used to derive star formation rates from the mid-IR 24 micron and from [O II] 3727 emission. Many cluster galaxies have SFR(24 um)/SFR([O II]) >> 1, indicative of star formation highly obscured by dust. We focus on the substantial minority of A851 cluster members where strong Balmer absorption points to a starburst on a 10^{8-9} year timescale. As is typical, A851 galaxies with strong Balmer absorption occur in two types: with optical emission (starforming), and without (post-starburst). Our principal result is the former, so-called e(a) galaxies, are mostly detected (9 out of 12) at 24 um -- for these we find typically SFR(24 um)/SFR([O II]) ~ 4. Strong Balmer absorption and high values of SFR(24 um)/SFR([O II]) both indicate moderately active starbursts and support the picture that e(a) galaxies are the active starbursts that feed the post-starburst population. While 24 um detections are frequent with Balmer-strong objects (even 6 out of 18 of the supposedly "post-starburst'' galaxies are detected) only 2 out of 7 of the continuously starforming `e(c)' galaxies (with weak Balmer absorption) are detected -- for them, SFR(24 um)/SFR([O II]) ~ 1. Their optical spectra resemble present-epoch spirals that dominate today's universe; we strengthen this association by that SFR(24 um)/SFR([O II]) ~ 1 is the norm today. That is, not just the amount of star formation, but its mode, has evolved strongly from z ~ 0.4 to the present. By fitting spectrophotometric models we measure the strength and duration of the bursts to quantify the evolutionary sequence from active- to post-starburst, and to harden the evidence that moderately active starbursts are the defining feature of starforming cluster galaxies at z ~ 0.4.
  • By exploting the data of three large surveys (WINGS, NFPS and SDSS), we present here a comparative analysis of the Fundamental Plane (FP hereafter) of the early-type galaxies (ETGs) belonging to 59 galaxy clusters in the redshift range $0.04<z<0.07$. We show that the variances of the distributions of the FP coefficients derived for the clusters in our sample are not consistent with the hypothesis of universality of the FP relation. By investigating the origin of such remarkable variances we find that, besides a couple of obvious factors, such as the adopted fitting technique and the method used to measure the photometric and kinematic variables, the coefficients of the FP are strongly influenced by a number of things, mainly related to the distribution of photometric/kinematic properties of galaxies in the particular sample under analysis. For instance, the $a$ coefficient derived for the whole sample of ETGs, turns out to decrease when faint galaxies are progressively removed from the sample, suggesting that bright and faint ETGs have systematically different FPs, likely because of different mechanisms of galaxy formation. In general, by comparing mock cluster samples with the real one, we conclude that the observed variances of the FP coefficients cannot be attributed just to statistical uncertainties. We speculate that the FP is actually a bent surface, which is approximated by different planes when different selection criteria, either chosen or induced by observations, are acting to define galaxies samples. We also find ...
  • We describe Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of 10 of the 20 ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS) fields. Each ~40 square arcminute field was imaged in the F814W filter with the Advanced Camera for Surveys Wide Field Camera. Based on these data, we present visual morphological classifications for the ~920 sources per field that are brighter than I_auto=23 mag. We use these classifications to quantify the morphological content of 10 intermediate-redshift (0.5 < z < 0.8) galaxy clusters within the HST survey region. The EDisCS results, combined with previously published data from seven higher redshift clusters, show no statistically significant evidence for evolution in the mean fractions of elliptical, S0, and late-type (Sp+Irr) galaxies in clusters over the redshift range 0.5 < z < 1.2. In contrast, existing studies of lower redshift clusters have revealed a factor of ~2 increase in the typical S0 fraction between z=0.4 and z=0, accompanied by a commensurate decrease in the Sp+Irr fraction and no evolution in the elliptical fraction. The EDisCS clusters demonstrate that cluster morphological fractions plateau beyond z ~ 0.4. They also exhibit a mild correlation between morphological content and cluster velocity dispersion, highlighting the importance of careful sample selection in evaluating evolution. We discuss these findings in the context of a recently proposed scenario in which the fractions of passive (E,S0) and star-forming (Sp,Irr) galaxies are determined primarily by the growth history of clusters.
  • We present weak lensing mass reconstructions for the 20 high-redshift clusters i n the ESO Distant Cluster Survey. The weak lensing analysis was performed on deep, 3-color optical images taken with VLT/FORS2, using a composite galaxy catalog with separate shape estimators measured in each passband. We find that the EDisCS sample is composed primarily of clusters that are less massive than t hose in current X-ray selected samples at similar redshifts, but that all of the fields are likely to contain massive clusters rather than superpositions of low mass groups. We find that 7 of the 20 fields have additional massive structures which are not associated with the clusters and which can affect the weak lensing mass determination. We compare the mass measurements of the remaining 13 clusters with luminosity measurements from cluster galaxies selected using photometric redshifts and find evidence of a dependence of the cluster mass-to-light ratio with redshift. Finally we determine the noise level in the shear measurements for the fields as a function of exposure time and seeing and demonstrate that future ground-based surveys which plan to perform deep optical imaging for use in weak lensing measurements must achieve point-spread functions smaller than a median of 0.6" FWHM.
  • We present the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS) a survey of 20 fields containing distant galaxy clusters with redshifts ranging from 0.4 to almost 1.0. Candidate clusters were chosen from among the brightest objects identified in the Las Campanas Distant Cluster Survey, half with estimated redshift z_est~0.5 and half with z_est~0.8. They were confirmed by identifying red sequences in moderately deep two colour data from VLT/FORS2. For confirmed candidates we have assembled deep three-band optical photometry using VLT/FORS2, deep near-infrared photometry in one or two bands using NTT/SOFI, deep optical spectroscopy using VLT/FORS2, wide field imaging in two or three bands using the ESO Wide Field Imager, and HST/ACS mosaic images for 10 of the most distant clusters. This first paper presents our sample and the VLT photometry we have obtained. We present images, colour-magnitude diagrams and richness estimates for our clusters, as well as giving redshifts and positions for the brightest cluster members. Subsequent papers will present our infrared photometry, spectroscopy, HST and wide-field imaging, as well as a wealth of further analysis and science results. Our reduced data become publicly available as these papers are accepted.
  • A two-band (B and V) wide-field imaging survey of a complete, all-sky X-ray selected sample of 78 clusters in the redshift range z=0.04-0.07 is presented. The aim of this survey is to provide the astronomical community with a complete set of homogeneous, CCD-based surface photometry and morphological data of nearby cluster galaxies located within 1.5 Mpc from the cluster center. The data collection has been completed in seven observing runs at the INT and ESO-2.2m telescopes. For each cluster, photometric data of about 2500 galaxies (down to V~23) and detailed morphological information of about 600 galaxies (down to V~21) are obtained by using specially designed automatic tools. As a natural follow up of the photometric survey, we also illustrate a long term spectroscopic program we are carrying out with the WHT-WYFFOS and AAT-2dF multifiber spectrographs. Star formation rates and histories, as well as metallicity estimates will be derived for about 350 galaxies per cluster from the line indices and equivalent widths measurements, allowing us to explore the link between the spectral properties and the morphological evolution in high- to low-density environments, and across a wide range in cluster X-ray luminosities and optical properties.
  • At a redshift of 0.18, Abell 1689 is so far the most distant cluster of galaxies for which substantial mid-infrared (MIR) data have been published. We present here the follow-up optical photometric and spectroscopic observations which were used to study the individual properties of the galaxies members of A1689. Sources with a low [15 micron] / [6.75 micron] flux ratio typically consist of luminous passive early-type galaxies while those with a high MIR color index are mainly luminous, blue, emission-line, morphologically disturbed spirals, i.e. the star-forming galaxies usually associated with the 'Butcher-Oemler' effect. On the other hand, at least 30% of the 15 micron sources have optical counterparts showing no evidence of current star-formation activity, while their 15 micron emission is most likely due to obscured star formation. We argue that the LW3 luminosity measured in the cluster members is a reliable tracer of the total infrared luminosity, L(IR). We derive from L(IR) a star-formation rate free of dust extinction, SFR(IR), which we compare with that determined in the optical from the flux of the [OII] emission line, SFR(opt). The highest total star formation rates (11 Msun/yr) and dust extinction are measured in those galaxies exhibiting in their optical spectrum a signature of a dusty starburst. In contrast, none of the galaxies with post-starburst optical spectra has been detected by ISOCAM. We find a median SFR(IR) of the LW3-detected galaxies of 2 Msun/yr, that is ten times higher than the median SFR(opt) of the [OII] detected galaxies. The ratio SFR(IR)/SFR(opt) is in fact very high, ranging between 10 and 100 for LW3-detected galaxies with [OII] emission. We conclude that a major part, at least 90%, of the star formation activity taking place in Abell 1689 is hidden.
  • This is the second paper in a series studying the photometric and spectroscopic properties of galaxies of different luminosities in the Coma cluster. The sample selection, spectroscopic observations and completeness functions are presented here. To study the spectral properties of galaxies as a function of their local environment, two fields were selected for spectroscopic observations to cover both the core (Coma1) and outskirts (ie. south-west of the core and centered on NGC4839)- (Coma3) of the cluster. Medium resolution spectroscopy (6-9 \AA) was carried out for a total of 490 galaxies in both fields (302 in Coma1 and 188 in Coma3), using the WYFFOS multi-fiber spectrograph on the William Herschel Telescope. The galaxies cover a range of $12 < R < 20$, corresponding to -23 < M_R < -15 (H0=65 km/sec/Mpc). The redshifts are measured with an accuracy of 100 km/sec. The spectral line strengths and equivalent widths are also measured for the same galaxies and analysed in Poggianti et al (2001- paper III). A total of 189 (Coma1) and 90 (Coma3) galaxies are identified as members of the Coma cluster. An analysis of the colors show that only two members of the Coma cluster in our sample have B-R > 2. The completeness functions for the spectroscopic sample is presented.
  • Among star forming galaxies, a spectral combination of a strong Hdelta line in absorption and a moderate [OII] emission has been suggested to be a useful method to identify dusty starburst galaxies at any redshift, on the basis of optical data alone. On one side it has been shown that such a spectral particularity is indeed suggestive of obscured starburst galaxies but, on the other, the degeneracy of the optical spectrum has hindered any quantitative estimate of the star formation and extinction during the burst. The optical spectrum by itself, even complemented with the information on the far-IR flux, is not enough to identify univocal evolutionary patterns. We discuss in the following whether it is possible to reduce these uncertainties by extending the spectral analyses to the near infrared spectral region.