• By performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations, we address the topological phase of CaAgP and investigate the topological phase transition in CaAg(P1-xAsx). We reveal that in CaAgP, the bulk band gap and surface states with a large bandwidth are topologically trivial, in agreement with hybrid density functional theory calculations. The calculations also indicate that application of "negative" hydrostatic pressure can transform trivial semiconducting CaAgP into an ideal topological nodal-line semimetal phase. The topological transition can be realized by partial isovalent P/As substitution at x = 0.38.
  • We have performed an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of BaCr$_2$As$_2$, which has the same crystal structure as BaFe$_2$As$_2$, a parent compound of Fe-based superconductors. We determine the Fermi surface of this material and its band dispersion over 5 eV of binding energy. Very moderate band renormalization (1.35) is observed for only two bands. We attribute this small renormalization to enhanced direct exchange as compared to Fe in BaFe$_2$As$_2$, and to a larger contribution of the $e_g$ orbitals in the composition of the bands forming the Fermi surface, leading to an effective valence count that is reduced by Fe $d$ - As $p$ hybridization.
  • The Weyl semimetal phase is a recently discovered topological quantum state of matter characterized by the presence of topologically protected degeneracies near the Fermi level. These degeneracies are the source of exotic phenomena, including the realization of chiral Weyl fermions as quasiparticles in the bulk and the formation of Fermi arc states on the surfaces. Here, we demonstrate that these two key signatures show distinct evolutions with the bulk band topology by performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, supported by first-principle calculations, on transition-metal monophosphides. While Weyl fermion quasiparticles exist only when the chemical potential is located between two saddle points of the Weyl cone features, the Fermi arc states extend in a larger energy scale and are robust across the bulk Lifshitz transitions associated with the recombination of two non-trivial Fermi surfaces enclosing one Weyl point into a single trivial Fermi surface enclosing two Weyl points of opposite chirality. Therefore, in some systems (e.g. NbP), topological Fermi arc states are preserved even if Weyl fermion quasiparticles are absent in the bulk. Our findings not only provide insight into the relationship between the exotic physical phenomena and the intrinsic bulk band topology in Weyl semimetals, but also resolve the apparent puzzle of the different magneto-transport properties observed in TaAs, TaP and NbP, where the Fermi arc states are similar.
  • Condensed matter systems can host quasiparticle excitations that are analogues to elementary particles such as Majorana, Weyl, and Dirac fermions. Recent advances in band theory have expanded the classification of fermions in crystals, and revealed crystal symmetry-protected electron excitations that have no high-energy counterparts. Here, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we demonstrate the existence of a triply degenerate point in the electronic structure of MoP crystal, where the quasiparticle excitations are beyond the Majorana-Weyl-Dirac classification. Furthermore, we observe pairs of Weyl points in the bulk electronic structure coexisting with the 'new fermions', thus introducing a platform for studying the interplay between different types of fermions.
  • We synthesized a series of V-doped LiFe$_{1-x}$V$_x$As single crystals. The superconducting transition temperature $T_c$ of LiFeAs decreases rapidly at a rate of 7 K per 1\% V. The Hall coefficient of LiFeAs switches from negative to positive with 4.2\% V doping, showing that V doping introduces hole carriers. This observation is further confirmed by the evaluation of the Fermi surface volume measured by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), from which a 0.3 hole doping per V atom introduced is deduced. Interestingly, the introduction of holes does not follow a rigid band shift. We also show that the temperature evolution of the electrical resistivity as a function of doping is consistent with a crossover from a Fermi liquid to a non-Fermi liquid. Our ARPES data indicate that the non-Fermi liquid behavior is mostly enhanced when one of the hole $d_{xz}/d_{yz}$ Fermi surfaces is well nested by the antiferromagnetic wave vector to the inner electron Fermi surface pocket with the $d_{xy}$ orbital character. The magnetic susceptibility of LiFe$_{1-x}$V$_x$As suggests the presence of strong magnetic impurities following V doping, thus providing a natural explanation to the rapid suppression of superconductivity upon V doping.
  • We investigate the band structure of BaBiO$_{3}$, an insulating parent compound of doped high-$T_{c}$ superconductors, using \emph{in situ} angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on thin films. The data compare favorably overall with density functional theory calculations within the local density approximation, demonstrating that electron correlations are weak. The bands exhibit Brillouin zone folding consistent with known BiO$_{6}$ breathing distortions. Though the distortions are often thought to coincide with Bi$^{3+}$/Bi$^{5+}$ charge ordering, core level spectra show that bismuth is monovalent. We further demonstrate that the bands closest to the Fermi level are primarily oxygen derived, while the bismuth $6s$ states mostly contribute to dispersive bands at deeper binding energy. The results support a model of Bi-O charge transfer in which hole pairs are localized on combinations of the O $2p$ orbitals.
  • Topological insulators (TIs) host novel states of quantum matter, distinguished from trivial insulators by the presence of nontrivial conducting boundary states connecting the valence and conduction bulk bands. Up to date, all the TIs discovered experimentally rely on the presence of either time reversal or symmorphic mirror symmetry to protect massless Dirac-like boundary states. Very recently, it has been theoretically proposed that several materials are a new type of TIs protected by nonsymmorphic symmetry, where glide-mirror can protect novel exotic surface fermions with hourglass-shaped dispersion. However, an experimental confirmation of such new nonsymmorphic TI (NSTI) is still missing. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we reveal that such hourglass topology exists on the (010) surface of crystalline KHgSb while the (001) surface has no boundary state, which is fully consistent with first-principles calculations. We thus experimentally demonstrate that KHgSb is a NSTI hosting hourglass fermions. By expanding the classification of topological insulators, this discovery opens a new direction in the research of nonsymmorphic topological properties of materials.
  • A new type of Weyl semimetal state, in which the energy values of Weyl nodes are not the local extrema, has been theoretically proposed recently, namely type II Weyl semimetal. Distinguished from type I semimetal (e.g. TaAs), the Fermi surfaces in a type II Weyl semimetal consist of a pair of electron and hole pockets touching at the Weyl node. In addition, Weyl fermions in type II Weyl semimetals violate Lorentz invariance. Due to these qualitative differences distinct spectroscopy and magnetotransport properties are expected in type II Weyl semimetals. Here, we present the direct observation of the Fermi arc states in MoTe2 by using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Two arc states are identified for each pair of Weyl nodes whoes surface projections of them possess single topological charge, which is a unique property for type II Weyl semimetals. The experimentally determined Fermi arcs are consistent with our first principle calculations. Our results unambiguously establish that MoTe2 is a type II Weyl semimetal, which serves as a great test bed to investigate the phenomena of new type of Weyl fermions with Lorentz invariance violated.
  • A Weyl semimetal possesses spin-polarized band-crossings, called Weyl nodes, connected by topological surface arcs. The low-energy excitations near the crossing points behave the same as massless Weyl fermions, leading to exotic properties like chiral anomaly. To have the transport properties dominated by Weyl fermions, Weyl nodes need to locate nearly at the chemical potential and enclosed by pairs of individual Fermi surfaces with nonzero Fermi Chern numbers. Combining angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculation, here we show that TaP is a Weyl semimetal with only single type of Weyl fermions, topologically distinguished from TaAs where two types of Weyl fermions contribute to the low-energy physical properties. The simple Weyl fermions in TaP are not only of fundamental interests but also of great potential for future applications. Fermi arcs on the Ta-terminated surface are observed, which appear in a different pattern from that on the As-termination in TaAs and NbAs.
  • We have investigated the spin texture of surface Fermi arcs in the recently discovered Weyl semimetal TaAs using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The experimental results demonstrate that the Fermi arcs are spin-polarized. The measured spin texture fulfills the requirement of mirror and time reversal symmetries and is well reproduced by our first-principles calculations, which gives strong evidence for the topologically nontrivial Weyl semimetal state in TaAs. The consistency between the experimental and calculated results further confirms the distribution of chirality of the Weyl nodes determined by first-principles calculations.
  • In 1929, H. Weyl proposed that the massless solution of Dirac equation represents a pair of new type particles, the so-called Weyl fermions [1]. However the existence of them in particle physics remains elusive for more than eight decades. Recently, significant advances in both topological insulators and topological semimetals have provided an alternative way to realize Weyl fermions in condensed matter as an emergent phenomenon: when two non-degenerate bands in the three-dimensional momentum space cross in the vicinity of Fermi energy (called as Weyl nodes), the low energy excitation behaves exactly the same as Weyl fermions. Here, by performing soft x-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements which mainly probe bulk band structure, we directly observe the long-sought-after Weyl nodes for the first time in TaAs, whose projected locations on the (001) surface match well to the Fermi arcs, providing undisputable experimental evidence of existence of Weyl fermion quasiparticles in TaAs.
  • Weyl semimetals are a class of materials that can be regarded as three-dimensional analogs of graphene breaking time reversal or inversion symmetry. Electrons in a Weyl semimetal behave as Weyl fermions, which have many exotic properties, such as chiral anomaly and magnetic monopoles in the crystal momentum space. The surface state of a Weyl semimetal displays pairs of entangled Fermi arcs at two opposite surfaces. However, the existence of Weyl semimetals has not yet been proved experimentally. Here we report the experimental realization of a Weyl semimetal in TaAs by observing Fermi arcs formed by its surface states using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Our first-principles calculations, matching remarkably well with the experimental results, further confirm that TaAs is a Weyl semimetal.
  • We report the temperature evolution of the detailed electronic band structure in FeSe single-crystals measured by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), including the degeneracy removal of the $d_{xz}$ and $d_{yz}$ orbitals at the $\Gamma$/Z and M points, and the orbital-selective hybridization between the $d_{xy}$ and $d_{xz/yz}$ orbitals. The temperature dependences of the splittings at the $\Gamma$/Z and M points are different, indicating that they are controlled by different order parameters. The splitting at the M point is closely related to the structural transition and is attributed to orbital ordering defined on Fe-Fe bonds with a $d$-wave form in the reciprocal space that breaks the rotational symmetry. In contrast, the band splitting at the $\Gamma$ points remains at temperature far above the structural transition. Although the origin of this latter splitting remains unclear, our experimental results exclude the previously proposed ferro-orbital ordering scenario.