• We present the results of the first, deep ALMA imaging covering the full 4.5 sq arcmin of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) as previously imaged with WFC3/IR on HST. Using a mosaic of 45 pointings, we have obtained a homogeneous 1.3mm image of the HUDF, achieving an rms sensitivity of 35 microJy, at a resolution of 0.7 arcsec. From an initial list of ~50 >3.5sigma peaks, a rigorous analysis confirms 16 sources with flux densities S(1.3) > 120 microJy. All of these have secure galaxy counterparts with robust redshifts (<z> = 2.15), and 12 are also detected at 6GHz in new deep JVLA imaging. Due to the wealth of supporting data in this unique field, the physical properties of the ALMA sources are well constrained, including their stellar masses (M*) and UV+FIR star-formation rates (SFR). Our results show that stellar mass is the best predictor of SFR in the high-z Universe; indeed at z > 2 our ALMA sample contains 7 of the 9 galaxies in the HUDF with M* > 2 x 10^10 Msun and we detect only one galaxy at z > 3.5, reflecting the rapid drop-off of high-mass galaxies with increasing redshift. The detections, coupled with stacking, allow us to probe the redshift/mass distribution of the 1.3-mm background down to S(1.3) ~ 10 micro-Jy. We find strong evidence for a steep `main sequence' for star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2, with SFR \propto M* and a mean specific SFR = 2.2 /Gyr. Moreover, we find that ~85% of total star formation at z ~ 2 is enshrouded in dust, with ~65% of all star formation at this epoch occurring in high-mass galaxies (M* > 2 x 10^10 Msun), for which the average obscured:unobscured SF ratio is ~200. Finally, we combine our new ALMA results with the existing HST data to revisit the cosmic evolution of star-formation rate density; we find that this peaks at z ~ 2.5, and that the star-forming Universe transits from primarily unobscured to primarily obscured thereafter at z ~ 4.
  • We review the uncertainties in high-z star-formation rate (SFR) measures and the constraints that one obtains from high-z gamma-ray burst (GRB) rates on them. We show that at the present time, the GRB rates per unit star-formation at z>3 are higher than at lower redshift. We also compare metallicity predictions made using a hierarchical model of cosmic chemical evolution based on two recently proposed SFRs, one based on the observed galaxy luminosity function at high redshift and one based on the GRB rate and find that within the considerable scatter in metal abundance measures, they both are consistent with the data. Analyzing the ensemble of different measurements together, we conclude that despite metallicity biases, GRBs may be a less biased probe of star-formation at z>3 than at z<2. There is likely to be a common origin to the high GRB rate per unit star-formation and the high observed Lyman-continuum production rate in high redshift galaxies and that this may be due to a relative overabundance of stars with mass $>$25Msun which are likely GRB progenitors. We also find that to reconcile these measurements with the Thomson scattering cross section of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons measured by Planck, the escape fraction of Lyman-continuum photons from galaxies must be low, about 15 percent or less and that the clumping factor of the IGM is likely to be small, about 3. Finally, we demonstrate that GRBs are unique probes of metallicity evolution in low-mass galaxy samples and that GRB hosts likely lost a significant fraction of metals to the intergalactic medium (IGM) due to feedback processes such as stellar winds and supernovae.
  • Long-duration Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) allow us to pinpoint and study star-forming galaxies in the early universe, thanks to their orders of magnitude brighter peak luminosities compared to other astrophysical sources, and their association with deaths of massive stars. We present Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 detections of three Swift GRB host galaxies lying at redshifts $z = 5.913$ (GRB 130606A), $z = 6.295$ (GRB 050904), and $z = 6.327$ (GRB 140515A) in the F140W (wide-$JH$ band, $\lambda_{\rm{obs}}\sim1.4\,\mu m$) filter. The hosts have magnitudes (corrected for Galactic extinction) of $m_{\rm{\lambda_{obs},AB}}= 26.34^{+0.14}_{-0.16}, 27.56^{+0.18}_{-0.22},$ and $28.30^{+0.25}_{-0.33}$ respectively. In all three cases the probability of chance coincidence of lower redshift galaxies is $\lesssim2\,\%$, indicating that the detected galaxies are most likely the GRB hosts. These are the first detections of high redshift ($z > 5$) GRB host galaxies in emission. The galaxies have luminosities in the range $0.1-0.6\,L^{*}_{z=6}$ (with $M_{1600}^{*}=-20.95\pm0.12$), and half-light radii in the range $0.6-0.9\,\rm{kpc}$. Both their half-light radii and luminosities are consistent with existing samples of Lyman-break galaxies at $z\sim6$. Spectroscopic analysis of the GRB afterglows indicate low metallicities ($[\rm{M/H}]\lesssim-1$) and low dust extinction ($A_{\rm{V}}\lesssim0.1$) along the line of sight. Using stellar population synthesis models, we explore the implications of each galaxy's luminosity for its possible star formation history, and consider the potential for emission-line metallicity determination with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope.
  • The Frontier Fields are a director's discretionary time campaign with HST and the Spitzer Space Telescope to see deeper into the universe than ever before. The Frontier Fields combine the power of HST and Spitzer with the natural gravitational telescopes of massive high-magnification clusters of galaxies to produce the deepest observations of clusters and their lensed galaxies ever obtained. Six clusters - Abell 2744, MACSJ0416.1-2403, MACSJ0717.5+3745, MACSJ1149.5+2223, Abell S1063, and Abell 370 - were selected based on their lensing strength, sky darkness, Galactic extinction, parallel field suitability, accessibility to ground-based facilities, HST, Spitzer and JWST observability, and pre-existing ancillary data. These clusters have been targeted by the HST ACS/WFC and WFC3/IR with coordinated parallels of adjacent blank fields for over 840 HST orbits. The Spitzer Space Telescope has dedicated > 1000 hours of director's discretionary time to obtain IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron imaging to ~26.5, 26.0 ABmag 5-sigma point-source depths in the six cluster and six parallel Frontier Fields. The Frontier Field parallel fields are the second-deepest observations thus far by HST with ~29th ABmag 5-sigma point source depths in seven optical - near-infrared bandpasses. Galaxies behind the Frontier Field cluster lenses experience typical magnification factors of a few, with small regions near the critical curves magnified by factors 10-100. Therefore, the Frontier Field cluster HST images achieve intrinsic depths of ~30-33 magnitudes over very small volumes. Early studies of the Frontier Fields have probed galaxies fainter than any seen before during the epoch of reionization 6 < z < 10, mapped out the cluster dark matter to unprecedented resolution, and followed lensed transient events.
  • The Hubble Deep Field (HDF) is a region in the sky that provides one of the deepest multi-wavelength views of the distant universe and has led to the detection of thousands of galaxies seen throughout cosmic time. An early map of the HDF at a wavelength of 850 microns that is sensitive to dust emission powered by star formation revealed the brightest source in the field, dubbed HDF850.1. For more than a decade, this source remained elusive and, despite significant efforts, no counterpart at shorter wavelengths, and thus no redshift, size or mass, could be identified. Here we report, using a millimeter wave molecular line scan, an unambiguous redshift determination for HDF850.1 of z=5.183. This places HDF850.1 in a galaxy overdensity at z~5.2 in the HDF, corresponding to a cosmic age of only 1.1 Gyr after the Big Bang. This redshift is significantly higher than earlier estimates and higher than most of the >100 sub-millimeter bright galaxies identified to date. The source has a star formation rate of 850 M_sun/yr and is spatially resolved on scales of 5 kpc, with an implied dynamical mass of ~1.3x10^11 M_sun, a significant fraction of which is present in the form of molecular gas. Despite our accurate redshift and position, a counterpart arising from starlight remains elusive.
  • (ABRIDGED) We examine the fundamental scaling relations of elliptical galaxies formed through mergers. Using hundreds of simulations to judge the impact of progenitor galaxy properties on merger remnants, we find that gas dissipation provides an important contribution to tilt in the Fundamental Plane relation. Dissipationless mergers of disks produce remnants that occupy the virial plane. As the gas content of disk galaxies is increased, the tilt of the Fundamental Plane relation increases and the slope of the Re-M_* relation steepens. For gas fractions fgas > 30%, the simulated Fundamental Plane scalings approach those observed in the K-band. In our simulations, feedback from supermassive black hole growth has only a minor influence on the stellar-mass scaling relations of spheroidal galaxies, but may play a role in maintaining the observed Fundamental Plane tilt at optical wavelengths by suppressing residual star formation in merger remnants. We estimate that \approx 40-100% of the Fundamental Plane tilt induced by structural properties owes to trends in the central total-to-stellar mass ratio M_total/M_* produced by dissipation. Lower mass systems obtain greater phase- space densities than higher mass systems, producing a galaxy mass-dependent central M_total/M_* and a corresponding tilt in the Fundamental Plane.
  • The cooling flow cluster Hydra A was observed during the orbital activation and calibration phase of the Chandra Observatory. While the X-ray image of the cluster exhibits complex structure in the central region as reported in McNamara $etal$, the large scale X-ray morphology of the cluster is fairly smooth. A spectroscopic analysis of the ACIS data shows that the gas temperature in Hydra A increases outward, reaches a maximum temperature of 4 keV at 200 kpc, and then decreases slightly at larger radii. The distribution of heavy elements is nonuniform, with a factor of two increase in the Fe and Si abundances within the central 100 kpc. Beyond the central 100 kpc the Si-to-Fe abundance ratio is twice solar, while the Si-to-Fe ratio of the central excess is consistent with the solar value. One of the more surprising results is the lack of spectroscopic evidence for multiphase gas within the bulk of the cooling flow. Beyond the central 30 kpc, the ACIS spectra are adequately fit with a single temperature model. The addition of a cooling flow component does not significantly improve the fit. Only within the central 30 kpc (where the cooling time is less than 1~Gyr), is there spectroscopic evidence for multiphase gas. However, the spectroscopic mass deposition rate is more than a factor of 10 less than the morphologically derived mass accretion rate at 30 kpc. We propose that the cooling flow region is convectively unstable due to heating by the central radio source which significantly reduces the net accretion rate.