• Heavy-ion collisions are well described by a dynamical evolution with a long hydrodynamical phase. In this phase the properties of the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma are reflected in the equation of state (EoS) and the transport coefficients, most prominently by the shear and bulk viscosity over entropy density ratios $\eta$/s(T) and $\zeta$/s(T), respectively. While the EoS is by now known to a high accuracy, the transport coefficients and in particular their temperature and density dependence are not well known from first-principle computations yet, as well as the possible influence they can have once used in hydrodynamical simulations. In this work, the most recent QCD-based parameters are provided as input to the MUSIC framework. A ratio $\eta$/s(T) computed with a QCD based approach is used for the first time \cite{Haas:2013hpa,Christiansen:2014ypa}. The IP-Glasma model is used to describe the initial energy density distribution, and UrQMD for the dilute hadronic phase. Simulations are performed for Pb--Pb collisions at $\sqrt{s_{\rm NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV, for different centrality intervals. The resulting kinematic distributions of the particles produced in the collisions are compared to data from the LHC, for several experimental observables. The high precision of the experimental results and the broad variety of observables considered allow to critically verify the quality of the description based on first-principle input to the hydrodynamic evolution.
  • Predictions for cold nuclear matter effects on charged hadrons, identified light hadrons, quarkonium and heavy flavor hadrons, Drell-Yan dileptons, jets, photons, gauge bosons and top quarks produced in $p+$Pb collisions at $\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} = 8.16$ TeV are compiled and, where possible, compared to each other. Predictions of the normalized ratios of $p+$Pb to $p+p$ cross sections are also presented for most of the observables, providing new insights into the expected role of cold nuclear matter effects. In particular, the role of nuclear parton distribution functions on particle production can now be probed over a wider range of phase space than ever before.
  • We provide an assessment of the energy dependence of key measurements within the scope of the machine parameters for a U.S. based Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) outlined in the EIC White Paper. We first examine the importance of the physics underlying these measurements in the context of the outstanding questions in nuclear science. We then demonstrate, through detailed simulations of the measurements, that the likelihood of transformational scientific insights is greatly enhanced by making the energy range and reach of the EIC as large as practically feasible.
  • Quark-gluon plasma produced at the early stage of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions is unstable, if weakly coupled, due to the anisotropy of its momentum distribution. Chromomagnetic fields are spontaneously generated and can reach magnitudes much exceeding typical values of the fields in equilibrated plasma. We consider a high energy test parton traversing an unstable plasma that is populated with strong fields. We study the momentum broadening parameter $\hat q$ which determines the radiative energy loss of the test parton. We develop a formalism which gives $\hat q$ as the solution of an initial value problem, and we focus on extremely oblate plasmas which are physically relevant for relativistic heavy ion collisions. The parameter $\hat q$ is found to be strongly dependent on time. For short times it is of the order of the equilibrium value, but at later times $\hat q$ grows exponentially due to the interaction of the test parton with unstable modes and becomes much bigger than the value in equilibrium. The momentum broadening is also strongly directionally dependent and is largest when the test parton velocity is transverse to the beam axis. Consequences of our findings for the phenomenology of jet quenching in relativistic heavy ion collisions are briefly discussed.
  • We constrain the average density profile of the proton and the amount of event-by-event fluctuations by simultaneously calculating the coherent and incoherent exclusive diffractive vector meson production cross section in deep inelastic scattering. Working within the Color Glass Condensate picture, we find that the gluonic density of the proton must have large geometric fluctuations in order to describe the experimentally measured large incoherent cross section.
  • We examine the origins of azimuthal correlations observed in high energy proton-nucleus collisions by considering the simple example of the scattering of uncorrelated partons off color fields in a large nucleus. We demonstrate how the physics of fluctuating color fields in the color glass condensate (CGC) effective theory generates these azimuthal multiparticle correlations and compute the corresponding Fourier coefficients v_n within different CGC approximation schemes. We discuss in detail the qualitative and quantitative differences between the different schemes. We will show how a recently introduced color field domain model that captures key features of the observed azimuthal correlations can be understood in the CGC effective theory as a model of non-Gaussian correlations in the target nucleus.
  • We investigate the consequences of a nonzero bulk viscosity coefficient on the transverse momentum spectra, azimuthal momentum anisotropy, and multiplicity of charged hadrons produced in heavy ion collisions at LHC energies. The agreement between a realistic 3D hybrid simulation and the experimentally measured data considerably improves with the addition of a bulk viscosity coefficient for strongly interacting matter. This paves the way for an eventual quantitative determination of several QCD transport coefficients from the experimental heavy ion and hadron-nucleus collision programs.
  • We investigate the implications of a nonzero bulk viscosity coefficient on the azimuthal momentum anisotropy of ultracentral relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. We find that, with IP-Glasma initial conditions, a finite bulk viscosity coefficient leads to a better description of the flow harmonics in ultracentral collisions. We then extract optimal values of bulk and shear viscosity coefficients that provide the best agreement with flow harmonic coefficients data in this centrality class.
  • The fluctuation-dissipation theorem requires the presence of thermal noise in viscous fluids. The time and length scales of heavy ion collisions are small enough so that the thermal noise can have a measurable effect on observables. Thermal noise is included in numerical simulations of high energy lead-lead collisions, increasing average values of the momentum eccentricity and contributing to its event by event fluctuations.
  • We investigate the effect of nucleon-nucleon correlations on the initial condition of ultra-central heavy ion collisions at LHC energies. We calculate the eccentricities of the MC-Glauber and IP-Glasma models in the 0--1% centrality class and show that they are considerably affected by the inclusion of such type of correlations. For an IP-Glasma initial condition, we further demonstrate that this effect survives the fluid-dynamical evolution of the system and can be observed in its final state azimuthal momentum anisotropy.
  • We present a first calculation of the dilepton yield and elliptic flow done with 3+1D viscous hydrodynamical simulations of relativistic heavy ion collisions at the top RHIC energy. A comparison with recent experimental data from the STAR collaboration is made.
  • We use the real-time Keldysh formalism to investigate finite lifetime effects on the photon emission from a quark-gluon plasma (QGP). We provide an ansatz which eliminates the divergent contribution from the vacuum polarization and renders the photon spectrum UV-finite if the time evolution of the QGP is described in a suitable manner.
  • The influence of time dependent medium modifications of low mass vector mesons on dilepton production is investigated using nonequilibrium quantum field theory. By working in the two-time representation memory effects are fully taken into account. For different scenarios the resulting dilepton yields are compared to quasi-equilibrium calculations and remarkable differences are found leading to the conclusion that memory effects can not be neglected when calculating dilepton yields from heavy ion collisions. Emphasis is put on a dropping mass scenario since it was recently claimed to be ruled out by the NA60 data. Here the memory effects turn out to be particularly important.
  • The influence of time dependent medium modifications of low mass vector mesons on dilepton yields is investigated within a nonequilibrium quantum field theoretical description on the basis of the Kadanoff-Baym equations. Time scales for the adaption of the spectral properties to changing self energies are given and, under use of a model for the fireball evolution, nonequilibrium dilepton yields from the decay of rho- and omega-mesons are calculated. In a comparison of these yields with those from calculations that assume instantaneous (Markovian) adaption to the changing medium, quantum mechanical memory effects turn out to be important.
  • It is investigated under which conditions an adiabatic adaption of the dynamic and spectral information of vector mesons to the changing medium in heavy ion collisions, as assumed in schematic model calculations and microscopic transport simulations, is a valid assumption. Therefore time dependent medium modifications of low mass vector mesons are studied within a non-equilibrium quantum field theoretical description. Timescales for the adaption of the spectral properties are given and non-equilibrium dilepton yields are calculated, leading to the result that memory effects are not negligible for most scenarios.