• We present the first results from the SAGE-Var program, a follow on to the Spitzer legacy program Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE; Meixner, et al. 2006). We obtained 4 epochs of photometry at 3.6 & 4.5 microns covering the bar of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and the central region of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) in order to probe the variability of extremely red sources missed by variability surveys conducted at shorter wavelengths, and to provide additional epochs of observation for known variables. Our 6 total epochs of observations allow us to probe infrared variability on 15 different timescales ranging from ~20 days to ~5 years. Out of a full catalog of 1,717,554 (LMC) and 457,760 (SMC) objects, we find 10 (LMC) and 6 (SMC) large amplitude AGB variables without optically measured variability owing to circumstellar dust obscuration. The catalog also contains multiple observations of known AGB variables, type I and II Cepheids, eclipsing variables, R CrB stars and young stellar objects which will be discussed in following papers. Here we present infrared Period-Luminosity (PL) relations for classical Cepheids in the Magellanic Clouds, as well as improved PL relationships for AGB stars pulsating in the fundamental mode using mean magnitudes constructed from 6 epochs of observations.
  • ALMA observations of the Galactic center with spatial resolution $2.61"\times0.97"$ resulted in the detection of 11 SiO (5-4) clumps of molecular gas within 0.6pc (15$"$) of Sgr A*, interior to the 2-pc circumnuclear molecular ring. The three SiO (5-4) clumps closest to Sgr A* show the largest central velocities, $\sim150$ \kms, and broadest asymmetric linewidths with full width zero intensity (FWZI) $\sim110-147$ \kms. The remaining clumps, distributed mainly to the NE of the ionized mini-spiral, have narrow FWZI ($\sim18-56$ \kms). Using CARMA SiO (2-1) data, LVG modeling of the the SiO line ratios for the broad velocity clumps, constrains the column density N(SiO) $\sim10^{14}$ cm$^{-2}$, and the H$_2$ gas density n$_{\rm H_2}=(3-9)\times10^5$ cm$^{-3}$ for an assumed kinetic temperature 100-200K. The SiO clumps are interpreted as highly embedded protostellar outflows, signifying an early stage of massive star formation near Sgr A* in the last $10^4-10^5$ years. Support for this interpretation is provided by the SiO (5-4) line luminosities and velocity widths which lie in the range measured for protostellar outflows in star forming regions in the Galaxy. Furthermore, SED modeling of stellar sources shows two YSO candidates near SiO clumps, supporting in-situ star formation near Sgr A*. We discuss the nature of star formation where the gravitational potential of the black hole dominates. In particular, we suggest that external radiative pressure exerted on self-shielded molecular clouds enhances the gas density, before the gas cloud become gravitationally unstable near Sgr A*. Alternatively, collisions between clumps in the ring may trigger gravitational collapse.
  • We have obtained time series observations of the Orion Nebula Cluster at 70 microns and 160 microns from the Herschel/PACS Photometer. This represents the first wide-field far-infrared photometric monitoring of a young star forming region. The acquired 35'x35' maps show complex extended structures, with unprecedented details, that trace the interaction between the molecular gas and the young hot stars. We detect 43 protostars, most of which are situated along the integral-shaped filament extending from the Orion nebula, through OMC2 and to OMC3. We present high-reliability light curves for some of these objects using the first six epochs of our observing program spread over 6 weeks. We find amplitude variations in excess of 20% for a fraction of the detected protostars over periods as short as a few weeks. This is inconsistent with the dynamical time-scales of cool far-IR emitting material that orbits at hundreds of AU from the protostar, and it suggests that the mechanism(s) responsible for the observed variability originates from the inner region of the protostars, likely driven by variable mass accretion.
  • Transitional circumstellar disks around young stellar objects have a distinctive infrared deficit around 10 microns in their Spectral Energy Distributions (SED), recently measured by the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS), suggesting dust depletion in the inner regions. These disks have been confirmed to have giant central cavities by imaging of the submillimeter (sub-mm) continuum emission using the Submillimeter Array (SMA). However, the polarized near-infrared scattered light images for most objects in a systematic IRS/SMA cross sample, obtained by HiCIAO on the Subaru telescope, show no evidence for the cavity, in clear contrast with SMA and Spitzer observations. Radiative transfer modeling indicates that many of these scattered light images are consistent with a smooth spatial distribution for micron-sized grains, with little discontinuity in the surface density of the micron-sized grains at the cavity edge. Here we present a generic disk model that can simultaneously account for the general features in IRS, SMA, and Subaru observations. Particularly, the scattered light images for this model are computed, which agree with the general trend seen in Subaru data. Decoupling between the spatial distributions of the micron-sized dust and mm-sized dust inside the cavity is suggested by the model, which, if confirmed, necessitates a mechanism, such as dust filtration, for differentiating the small and big dust in the cavity clearing process. Our model also suggests an inwardly increasing gas-to-dust-ratio in the inner disk, and different spatial distributions for the small dust inside and outside the cavity, echoing the predictions in grain coagulation and growth models.
  • A group of four compact HII regions associated with the well-known 50 km/s molecular cloud is the closest site of on-going star formation to the dynamical center of the Galaxy, at a projected distance of ~6 pc. We present a study of ionized gas based on the [NeII] (12.8 micron) line, as well as multi-frequency radio continuum, HST Pa alpha and Spitzer IRAC observations of the most compact member of the HII group, Sgr A East HII D. The radio continuum image at 6cm shows that this source breaks up into two equally bright ionized features, D1 and D2. The SED of the D source is consistent with it being due to a 25\pm3 solar mass, star with a luminosity of 8\pm3x10^4 solar luminosity. The inferred mass, effective temperature of the UV source and the ionization rate are compatible with a young O9-B0 star. The ionized features D1 and D2 are considered to be ionized by UV radiation collimated by an accretion disk. We consider that the central massive star photoevaporates its circumstellar disk on a timescale of 3x10^4 years giving a mass flux ~3x10^{-5} solar mass per yr and producing the ionized material in D1 and D2 expanding in an inhomogeneous medium. The ionized gas kinematics, as traced by the [Ne II] emission, is difficult to interpret, but it could be explained by the interaction of a bipolar jet with surrounding gas along with what appears to to be a conical wall of lower velocity gas. The other HII regions, Sgr A East A-C, have morphologies and kinematics that more closely resemble cometary flows seen in other compact HII regions, where gas moves along a paraboloidal surface formed by the interaction of a stellar wind with a molecular cloud.
  • We present the classification of 197 point sources observed with the Infrared Spectrograph in the SAGE-Spec Legacy program on the Spitzer Space Telescope. We introduce a decision-tree method of object classification based on infrared spectral features, continuum and spectral energy distribution shape, bolometric luminosity, cluster membership, and variability information, which is used to classify the SAGE-Spec sample of point sources. The decision tree has a broad application to mid-infrared spectroscopic surveys, where supporting photometry and variability information are available. We use these classifications to make deductions about the stellar populations of the Large Magellanic Cloud and the success of photometric classification methods. We find 90 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, 29 young stellar objects, 23 post-AGB objects, 19 red supergiants, eight stellar photospheres, seven background galaxies, seven planetary nebulae, two HII regions and 12 other objects, seven of which remain unclassified.
  • IRAS04325+2402 (herafter IRAS04325) is a complex protostellar system hosting two young stellar objects (AB and C in the following) at a separation of 1250AU. Here we present new deep Gemini imaging and spectroscopy for the system covering the wavelength regime from 1-12mu as well as Sub-Millimeter Array interferometry at 870mu, in combination with Spitzer and literature data. Object AB is a low-mass star with a disk/envelope system and an outflow cavity, which is prominently seen in infrared images. Object C, previously suspected to be a brown dwarf, is likely a very low mass star, with an effective temperature of ~3400K. It features an edge-on disk and an elongated envelope, and shows strong indications for accretion and ejection activity. Both objects are likely to drive parsec-scale molecular outflows. The two objects are embedded in an isolated, dense molecular cloud core. High extinction, lack of X-ray emission, and relatively high bolometric luminosity argue for a very young age below 1Myr. The disk/outflow systems of AB and C are misaligned by ~60deg against each other and by 80 and 40deg against the orbital plane of the binary. The system might be a good case for primordial misalignment, as opposed to misalignment caused by dynamical interactions, because the outflow direction is constant and the realignment timescale is likely larger than the system age. This favours turbulent fragmentation, rather than rotational fragmentation, as the formation scenario. We show that the spectral energy distributions and images for the two objects can be reproduced with radiative transfer models for disk/envelope systems. Our analysis provides reassurance in the established paradigm for the structure and early evolution of YSOs, but stresses the importance of developing 3D models with sophisticated dust chemistry (abridged).
  • The HERschel Inventory of The Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) of the Magellanic Clouds will use dust emission to investigate the life cycle of matter in both the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC). Using the Herschel Space Observatory's PACS and SPIRE photometry cameras, we imaged a 2x8 square degree strip through the LMC, at a position angle of ~22.5 degrees as part of the science demonstration phase of the Herschel mission. We present the data in all 5 Herschel bands: PACS 100 and 160 {\mu}m and SPIRE 250, 350 and 500 {\mu}m. We present two dust models that both adequately fit the spectral energy distribution for the entire strip and both reveal that the SPIRE 500 {\mu}m emission is in excess of the models by 6 to 17%. The SPIRE emission follows the distribution of the dust mass, which is derived from the model. The PAH-to-dust mass (f_PAH) image of the strip reveals a possible enhancement in the LMC bar in agreement with previous work. We compare the gas mass distribution derived from the HI 21 cm and CO J=1-0 line emission maps to the dust mass map from the models and derive gas-to-dust mass ratios (GDRs). The dust model, which uses the standard graphite and silicate optical properties for Galactic dust, has a very low GDR = 65(+15,-18) making it an unrealistic dust model for the LMC. Our second dust model, which uses amorphous carbon instead of graphite, has a flatter emissivity index in the submillimeter and results in a GDR = 287(+25,-42) that is more consistent with a GDR inferred from extinction.
  • We demonstrate the unique capabilities of Herschel to study very young luminous extragalactic young stellar objects (YSOs) by analyzing a central strip of the Large Magellanic Cloud obtained through the HERITAGE Science Demonstration Program. We combine PACS 100 and 160, and SPIRE 250, 350, and 500 microns photometry with 2MASS (1.25-2.17 microns) and Spitzer IRAC and MIPS (3.6-70 microns) to construct complete spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of compact sources. From these, we identify 207 candidate embedded YSOs in the observed region, ~40% never-before identified. We discuss their position in far-infrared color-magnitude space, comparing with previously studied, spectroscopically confirmed YSOs and maser emission. All have red colors indicating massive cool envelopes and great youth. We analyze four example YSOs, determining their physical properties by fitting their SEDs with radiative transfer models. Fitting full SEDs including the Herschel data requires us to increase the size and mass of envelopes included in the models. This implies higher accretion rates (greater than or equal to 0.0001 M_sun/yr), in agreement with previous outflow studies of high-mass protostars. Our results show that Herschel provides reliable longwave SEDs of large samples of high-mass YSOs; discovers the youngest YSOs whose SEDs peak in Herschel bands; and constrains the physical properties and evolutionary stages of YSOs more precisely than was previously possible.
  • Using Spitzer IRAC observations from the SAGE-SMC Legacy program and archived Spitzer IRAC data, we investigate dust production in 47 Tuc, a nearby massive Galactic globular cluster. A previous study detected infrared excess, indicative of circumstellar dust, in a large population of stars in 47 Tuc, spanning the entire Red Giant Branch (RGB). We show that those results suffered from effects caused by stellar blending and imaging artifacts and that it is likely that no stars below about 1 mag from the tip of the RGB are producing dust. The only stars that appear to harbor dust are variable stars, which are also the coolest and most luminous stars in the cluster.
  • The central kpc of the Milky Way might be expected to differ significantly from the rest of the Galaxy with regard to gas dynamics and the formation of YSOs. We probe this possibility with mid-infrared observations obtained with IRAC and MIPS on Spitzer and with MSX. We use color-color diagrams and SED fits to explore the nature of YSO candidates (including objects with 4.5 micron excesses possibly due to molecular emission). There is an asymmetry in the distribution of the candidate YSOs, which tend to be found at negative Galactic longitudes; this behavior contrasts with that of the molecular gas, approximately 2/3 of which is at positive longitudes. The small scale height of these objects suggests that they are within the Galactic center region and are dynamically young. They lie between two layers of infrared dark clouds and may have originated from these clouds. We identify new sites for this recent star formation. The methanol masers appear to be associated with young, embedded YSOs characterized by 4.5 micron excesses. We use the SEDs of these sources to estimate their physical characteristics. Within the central 400x50 pc (|l|<1.3\degr and |b|<10') the star formation rate based on the identification of Stage I evolutionary phase of YSO candidates is about 0.14 solar mass/yr. We suggest that a recent burst of star formation took place within the last 10^5 years. This suggestion is also consistent with estimates of star formation rates within the last ~10^7 years showing a peak around 10^5 years ago. Lastly, we find that the Schmidt-Kennicutt Law applies well in the central 400 pc of the Galaxy. This implies that star formation does not appear to be dramatically affected by the extreme physical conditions in the Galactic center region.
  • (abridged) We study photoelectric heating throughout the Large Magellanic Cloud. We quantify the importance of the [CII] cooling line and the photoelectric heating process of various environments in the LMC and investigate which parameters control the extent of photoelectric heating. We use the BICE [CII] map and the Spitzer/SAGE infrared maps. We examine the spatial variations in the efficiency of photoelectric heating: photoelectric heating rate over power absorbed by grains. We correlate the photoelectric heating efficiency and the emission from various dust constituents and study the variations as a function of H\alpha emission, dust temperatures, and the total infrared luminosity. From this we estimate radiation field, gas temperature, and electron density. We find systematic variations in photoelectric efficiency. The highest efficiencies are found in the diffuse medium, while the lowest coincide with bright star-forming regions (~1.4 times lower). The [CII] line emission constitutes 1.32% of the far infrared luminosity across the whole of the LMC. We find correlations between the [CII] emission and ratios of the mid infrared and far infrared bands, which comprise various dust constituents. The correlations are interpreted in light of the spatial variations of the dust abundance and by the local environmental conditions that affect the dust emission properties. As a function of the total infrared surface brightness, S_{TIR}, the [CII] surface brightness can be described as: S_{[CII]}=1.25 S_{TIR}^{0.69} [10^{-3} erg s^{-1} cm^{-2} sr^{-1}]. The [CII] emission is well-correlation with the 8 micrometer emission, suggesting that the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons play a dominant role in the photoelectric heating process.
  • Color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) are presented for the Spitzer SAGE (Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution) survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). IRAC and MIPS 24 um epoch one data are presented. These data represent the deepest, widest mid-infrared CMDs of their kind ever produced in the LMC. Combined with the 2MASS survey, the diagrams are used to delineate the evolved stellar populations in the Large Magellanic Cloud as well as Galactic foreground and extragalactic background populations. Some 32000 evolved stars brighter than the tip of the red giant branch are identified. Of these, approximately 17500 are classified as oxygen-rich, 7000 carbon-rich, and another 1200 as ``extreme'' asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Brighter members of the latter group have been called ``obscured'' AGB stars in the literature owing to their dusty circumstellar envelopes. A large number (1200) of luminous oxygen--rich AGB stars/M supergiants are also identified. Finally, there is strong evidence from the 24 um MIPS channel that previously unexplored, lower luminosity oxygen-rich AGB stars contribute significantly to the mass loss budget of the LMC (1200 such sources are identified).
  • We present observations of four T Tauri stars using long baseline infrared interferometry from the Palomar Testbed Interferometer. The target sources, T Tau N, SU Aur, RY Tau and DR Tau, are all known to be surrounded by dusty circumstellar disks. The observations directly trace the inner regions (< 1 AU) of the disk and can be used to constrain the physical properties of this material. For three of the sources observed, the infrared emission is clearly resolved. We first use geometric models to characterize the emission region size, which ranges from 0.04 to 0.3 AU in radius. We then use Monte Carlo radiation transfer models of accretion disks to jointly model the spectral energy distribution and the interferometric observations with disk models including accretion and scattering. With these models, we are able to reproduce the data set with extended emission arising from structures larger than 10 milliarcseconds contributing less than 6% of the K band emission, consistent with there being little or no envelope remaining for these Class II sources (d log(lambda*F_lambda)/d log(lambda) ~ -2 to 0 in the infrared). The radiation transfer models have inner radii for the dust similar to the geometric models; however, for RY Tau emission from gas within the inner dust radius contributes significantly to the model flux and visibility at infrared wavelengths. The main conclusion of our modeling is that emission from inner gas disks (between the magnetic truncation radius and the dust destruction radius) can be a significant component in the inner disk flux for sources with large inner dust radii.
  • [Abridged] We present ISO far-infrared (IR) observations of 21 hard X-ray selected AGN from the HEAO-1 A2 sample. We compare the far-IR to X-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of this sample with various radio and optically selected AGN samples. The hard-X-ray selected sample shows a wider range of optical/UV shapes extending to redder near-IR colors. The bluer objects are Seyfert 1s, while the redder AGN are mostly intermediate or type 2 Seyferts. This is consistent with a modified unification model in which the amount of obscuring material increases with viewing angle and may be clumpy. Such a scenario, already suggested by differing optical/near-IR spectroscopic and X-ray AGN classifications, allows for different amounts of obscuration of the continuum emission in different wavebands and of the broad emission line region which results in a mixture of behaviors for AGN with similar optical emission line classifications. The resulting limits on the column density of obscuring material through which we are viewing the redder AGN are 100 times lower than for the standard optically thick torus models. The resulting decrease in optical depth of the obscuring material allows the AGN to heat more dust at larger radial distances. We show that an AGN-heated, flared, dusty disk with mass 10^9 solar and size of few hundred pc is able to generate optical-far-IR SEDs which reproduce the wide range of SEDs present in our sample with no need for an additional starburst component to generate the long-wavelength, cooler part of the IR continuum.