• We exploit a sample of ultra-faint high-redshift galaxies (demagnified HST $H_{160}$ magnitude $>30$) in the Frontier Fields clusters A2744 and M0416 to constrain a theoretical model for the UV luminosity function (LF) in the presence of photoionization feedback. The objects have been selected on the basis of accurate photometric redshifts computed from multi-band photometry including 7 HST bands and deep $K_s$ and IRAC observations. Magnification is computed on an object-by-object basis from all available lensing models of the two clusters. We take into account source detection completeness as a function of luminosity and size, magnification effects and systematics in the lens modeling of the clusters under investigation. We find that our sample of high-$z$ galaxies constrain the cut-off halo circular velocity below which star-formation is suppressed by photo-ionization feedback to $v_c^{\rm cut} < 50$ km s$^{-1}$. This circular velocity corresponds to a halo mass of $\approx5.6\times10^9~M_\odot$ and $\approx2.3\times10^9~M_\odot$ at $z=5$ and 10 respectively: higher mass halos can thus sustain continuous star formation activity without being quenched by external ionizing flux. More stringent constraints are prevented by the uncertainty in the modeling of the cluster lens, as embodied by systematic differences among the lens models available.
  • After two ALMA observing cycles, only a handful of [CII] $158\,\mu m$ emission line searches in z>6 galaxies have reported a positive detection, questioning the applicability of the local [CII]-SFR relation to high-z systems. To investigate this issue we use the Vallini et al. 2013 (V13) model, based on high-resolution, radiative transfer cosmological simulations to predict the [CII] emission from the interstellar medium of a z~7 (halo mass $M_h=1.17\times10^{11}M_{\odot}$) galaxy. We improve the V13 model by including (a) a physically-motivated metallicity (Z) distribution of the gas, (b) the contribution of Photo-Dissociation Regions (PDRs), (c) the effects of Cosmic Microwave Background on the [CII] line luminosity. We study the relative contribution of diffuse neutral gas to the total [CII] emission ($F _{diff}/F_{tot}$) for different SFR and Z values. We find that the [CII] emission arises predominantly from PDRs: regardless of the galaxy properties, $F _{diff}/F_{tot}\leq 10$% since, at these early epochs, the CMB temperature approaches the spin temperature of the [CII] transition in the cold neutral medium ($T_{CMB}\sim T_s^{CNM}\sim 20$ K). Our model predicts a high-z [CII]-SFR relation consistent with observations of local dwarf galaxies ($0.02<Z/Z_{\odot}<0.5$). The [CII] deficit suggested by actual data ($L_{CII}<2.0\times 10^7 L_{\odot}$ in BDF3299 at z~7.1) if confirmed by deeper ALMA observations, can be ascribed to negative stellar feedback disrupting molecular clouds around star formation sites. The deviation from the local [CII]-SFR would then imply a modified Kennicutt-Schmidt relation in z>6 galaxies. Alternatively/in addition, the deficit might be explained by low gas metallicities ($Z<0.1 Z_{\odot}$).
  • Cosmic metal enrichment is one of the key physical processes regulating galaxy formation and the evolution of the intergalactic medium (IGM). However, determining the metal content of the most distant galaxies has proven so far almost impossible; also, absorption line experiments at $z\sim6$ become increasingly difficult because of instrumental limitations and the paucity of background quasars. With the advent of ALMA, far-infrared emission lines provide a novel tool to study early metal enrichment. Among these, the [CII] line at 157.74 $\mu$m is the most luminous line emitted by the interstellar medium of galaxies. It can also resonant scatter CMB photons inducing characteristic intensity fluctuations ($\Delta I/I_{CMB}$) near the peak of the CMB spectrum, thus allowing to probe the low-density IGM. We compute both [CII] galaxy emission and metal-induced CMB fluctuations at $z\sim 6$ by using Adaptive Mesh Refinement cosmological hydrodynamical simulations and produce mock observations to be directly compared with ALMA BAND6 data ($\nu_{obs}\sim 272$ GHz). The [CII] line flux is correlated with $M_{UV}$ as $\log(F_{peak}/\mu{\rm Jy})=-27.205-2.253\,M_{UV}-0.038\,M_{UV}^2$. Such relation is in very good agreement with recent ALMA observations (e.g. Maiolino et al. 2015; Capak et al. 2015) of $M_{UV}<-20$ galaxies. We predict that a $M_{UV}=-19$ ($M_{UV}=-18$) galaxy can be detected at $4\sigma$ in $\simeq40$ (2000) hours, respectively. CMB resonant scattering can produce $\simeq\pm 0.1\,\mu$Jy/beam emission/absorptions features that are very challenging to be detected with current facilities. The best strategy to detect these signals consists in the stacking of deep ALMA observations pointing fields with known $M_{UV}\simeq-19$ galaxies. This would allow to simultaneously detect both [CII] emission from galactic reionization sources and CMB fluctuations produced by $z\sim6$ metals.
  • We study the Initial Mass Function (IMF) and host halo properties of Intermediate Mass Black Holes (IMBH, 10^{4-6} Msun) formed inside metal-free, UV illuminated atomic cooling haloes (virial temperature T_vir > 10^4 K) either via the direct collapse of the gas or via an intermediate Super Massive Star (SMS) stage. We achieve this goal in three steps: (a) we derive the gas accretion rate for a proto-SMS to undergo General Relativity instability and produce a direct collapse black hole (DCBH) or to enter the ZAMS and later collapse into a IMBH; (b) we use merger-tree simulations to select atomic cooling halos in which either a DCBH or SMS can form and grow, accounting for metal enrichment and major mergers that halt the growth of the proto-SMS by gas fragmentation. We derive the properties of the host halos and the mass distribution of black holes at this stage, and dub it the "Birth Mass Function"; (c) we follow the further growth of the DCBH due to accretion of leftover gas in the parent halo and compute the final IMBH mass.We consider two extreme cases in which minihalos (T_vir < 10^4 K) can (fertile) or cannot (sterile) form stars and pollute their gas leading to a different IMBH IMF. In the (fiducial) fertile case the IMF is bimodal extending over a broad range of masses, M= (0.5-20)x10^5 Msun, and the DCBH accretion phase lasts from 10 to 100 Myr. If minihalos are sterile, the IMF spans the narrower mass range M= (1-2.8)x10^6 Msun, and the DCBH accretion phase is more extended (70-120 Myr). We conclude that a good seeding prescription is to populate halos (a) of mass 7.5 < log (M_h/Msun) < 8, (b) in the redshift range 8 < z < 17, (c) with IMBH in the mass range 4.75 < log (M_BH/Msun) < 6.25.