• Photoionization fronts play a dominant role in many astrophysical situations, but remain difficult to achieve in a laboratory experiment. We present the results from a computational parameter study evaluating the feasibility of the photoionization experiment presented in the design paper by Drake, R. P., Hazak, G., Keiter, P. A., Davis, J. S., Patterson, C. R., Frank, A., Blackman, E. G., & Busquet, M. 2016, ApJ, 833, 249 in which a photoionization front is generated in a nitrogen medium . The nitrogen gas density and the Planckian radiation temperature of the x-ray source define each simulation. Simulations modeled experiments in which the x-ray flux is generated by a laser-heated gold foil, suitable for experiments using many kJ of laser energy, and experiments in which the flux is generated by a "z-pinch" device, which implodes a cylindrical shell of conducting wires. The models are run using CRASH, our block-adaptive-mesh code for multi-material radiation hydrodynamics. The radiative transfer model uses multi-group, flux-limited diffusion with thirty radiation groups. In addition, electron heat conduction is modeled using a single-group, flux-limited diffusion. In the theory, a photoionization front can exist only when the ratios of the electron recombination rate to the photoionization rate and the electron impact ionization rate to the recombination rate lie in certain ranges. These ratios are computed for several ionization states of nitrogen. Photoionization fronts are found to exist for laser driven models with moderate nitrogen densities ($\sim$10$^{21}$ cm$^{-3}$) and radiation temperatures above 90 eV. For "z-pinch" driven models, lower nitrogen densities are preferred ($<$10$^{21}$ cm$^{-3}$). We conclude that the proposed experiments are likely to generate photoionization fronts.
  • The search of life in the Universe is a fundamental problem of astrobiology and a major priority for NASA. A key area of major progress since the NASA Astrobiology Strategy 2015 (NAS15) has been a shift from the exoplanet discovery phase to a phase of characterization and modeling of the physics and chemistry of exoplanetary atmospheres, and the development of observational strategies for the search for life in the Universe by combining expertise from four NASA science disciplines including heliophysics, astrophysics, planetary science and Earth science. The NASA Nexus for Exoplanetary System Science (NExSS) has provided an efficient environment for such interdisciplinary studies. Solar flares, coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles produce disturbances in interplanetary space collectively referred to as space weather, which interacts with the Earth upper atmosphere and causes dramatic impact on space and ground-based technological systems. Exoplanets within close in habitable zones around M dwarfs and other active stars are exposed to extreme ionizing radiation fluxes, thus making exoplanetary space weather (ESW) effects a crucial factor of habitability. In this paper, we describe the recent developments and provide recommendations in this interdisciplinary effort with the focus on the impacts of ESW on habitability, and the prospects for future progress in searching for signs of life in the Universe as the outcome of the NExSS workshop held in Nov 29 - Dec 2, 2016, New Orleans, LA. This is one of five Life Beyond the Solar System white papers submitted by NExSS to the National Academy of Sciences in support of the Astrobiology Science Strategy for the Search for Life in the Universe.
  • We perform and analyze results of a global magnetohydrodyanmic (MHD) simulation of the fast coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2011 March 7. The simulation is made using the newly developed Alfv\'en Wave Solar Model (AWSoM), which describes the background solar wind starting from the upper chromosphere and extends to 24 R$_{\odot}$. Coupling AWSoM to an inner heliosphere (IH) model with the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) extends the total domain beyond the orbit of Earth. Physical processes included in the model are multi-species thermodynamics, electron heat conduction (both collisional and collisionless formulations), optically thin radiative cooling, and Alfv\'en-wave turbulence that accelerates and heats the solar wind. The Alfv\'en-wave description is physically self-consistent, including non-Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) reflection and physics-based apportioning of turbulent dissipative heating to both electrons and protons. Within this model, we initiate the CME by using the Gibson-Low (GL) analytical flux rope model and follow its evolution for days, in which time it propagates beyond STEREO A. A detailed comparison study is performed using remote as well as \textit{in situ} observations. Although the flux rope structure is not compared directly due to lack of relevant ejecta observation at 1 AU in this event, our results show that the new model can reproduce many of the observed features near the Sun (e.g., CME-driven extreme ultraviolet (EUV) waves, deflection of the flux rope from the coronal hole, "double-front" in the white light images) and in the heliosphere (e.g., shock propagation direction, shock properties at STEREO A).
  • We present a first-principles-based coronal mass ejection (CME) model suitable for both scientific and operational purposes by combining a global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) solar wind model with a flux rope-driven CME model. Realistic CME events are simulated self-consistently with high fidelity and forecasting capability by constraining initial flux rope parameters with observational data from GONG, SOHO/LASCO, and STEREO/COR. We automate this process so that minimum manual intervention is required in specifying the CME initial state. With the newly developed data-driven Eruptive Event Generator Gibson-Low (EEGGL), we present a method to derive Gibson-Low (GL) flux rope parameters through a handful of observational quantities so that the modeled CMEs can propagate with the desired CME speeds near the Sun. A test result with CMEs launched with different Carrington rotation magnetograms are shown. Our study shows a promising result for using the first-principles-based MHD global model as a forecasting tool, which is capable of predicting the CME direction of propagation, arrival time, and ICME magnetic field at 1 AU (see companion paper by Jin et al. 2016b).
  • In the present work, we test the predictions of the AWSoM model, a global extended-MHD model capable of calculating the propagation and turbulent dissipation of Alfv\'en waves in any magnetic topology, against high resolution spectra of the quiescent off-disk solar corona. Wave dissipation is the only heating mechanism assumed in this model. Combining 3D model results with the CHIANTI atomic database, we were able to create synthetic line-of-sight spectra which include the effects of emission line broadening due to both thermal and wave-related non-thermal motions. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time a global model is used to obtain synthetic non-thermal line broadening. We obtained a steady-state solution driven by a synoptic magnetogram and compared the synthetic spectra with SUMER observations of a quiescent area above the solar west limb extending between 1.04 and 1.34 solar radii at the equator. Both the predicted line widths and the total line fluxes were consistent with the observations for 5 different ions. Using the 3D solution, we were able to locate the region that contributes the most to the emission used for measuring electron properties; we found that region to be a pseudo-streamer, whose modeled electron temperature and density are consistent with the measured ones. We conclude that the turbulent dissipation assumed in the AWSoM model can simultaneously account for the observed heating rate and the non-dissipated wave energy observed in this region.
  • We describe, analyze and validate the recently developed Alfv\'en Wave Solar Model (AWSoM), a 3D global model starting from the top of the chromosphere and extending into interplanetary space (up to 1-2 AU). This model solves the extended two temperature magnetohydrodynamics equations coupled to a wave kinetic equation for low frequency Alfv\'en waves. In this picture, heating and acceleration of the plasma are due to wave dissipation and wave pressure gradients, respectively. The dissipation process is described by a fully developed turbulent cascade of counter-propagating waves. We adopt a unified approach for calculating the wave dissipation in both open and closed magnetic field lines, allowing for a self-consistent treatment of any magnetic topology. Wave dissipation is the only heating mechanism assumed in the model, and no geometric heating functions are invoked. Electron heat conduction and radiative cooling are also included. We demonstrate that the large-scale, steady-state (in the co-rotating frame) properties of the solar environment are reproduced, using three adjustable parameters: the Poynting flux of chromospheric Alfv\'en waves, the perpendicular correlation length of the turbulence, and a pseudo-reflection coefficient. We compare model results for Carrington Rotation 2063 (November-December 2007) to remote observations in the EUV and X-ray ranges from STEREO, SOHO and Hinode spacecraft, as well as to in-situ measurements performed by Ulysses. The model results are in good agreement with observations. This is the first global model capable of simultaneously reproducing the multi-wavelength observations of the lower corona and the wind structure beyond Earth's orbit.
  • We present the latest improvements in the Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) code, a parallel block-adaptive-mesh Eulerian code for simulating high-energy-density plasmas. The implementation can solve for radiation models with either a gray or a multigroup method in the flux-limited-diffusion approximation. The electrons and ions are allowed to be out of temperature equilibrium and flux-limited electron thermal heat conduction is included. We have recently implemented a CRASH laser package with 3-D ray tracing, resulting in improved energy deposition evaluation. New, more accurate opacity models are available which significantly improve radiation transport in materials like xenon. In addition, the HYPRE preconditioner has been added to improve the radiation implicit solver. With this updated version of the CRASH code we study radiative shock tube problems. In our set-up, a 1 ns, 3.8 kJ laser pulse irradiates a 20 micron beryllium disk, driving a shock into a xenon-filled plastic tube. The electrons emit radiation behind the shock. This radiation from the shocked xenon preheats the unshocked xenon. Photons traveling ahead of the shock will also interact with the plastic tube, heat it, and in turn this can drive another shock off the wall into the xenon. We are now able to simulate the long term evolution of radiative shocks.
  • We use the recently developed Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) code to numerically simulate laser-driven radiative shock experiments. These shocks are launched by an ablated beryllium disk and are driven down xenon-filled plastic tubes. The simulations are initialized by the two-dimensional version of the Lagrangian Hyades code which is used to evaluate the laser energy deposition during the first 1.1ns. The later times are calculated with the CRASH code. This code solves for the multi-material hydrodynamics with separate electron and ion temperatures on an Eulerian block-adaptive-mesh and includes a multi-group flux-limited radiation diffusion and electron thermal heat conduction. The goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the capability to simulate radiative shocks of essentially three-dimensional experimental configurations, such as circular and elliptical nozzles. We show that the compound shock structure of the primary and wall shock is captured and verify that the shock properties are consistent with order-of-magnitude estimates. The produced synthetic radiographs can be used for comparison with future nozzle experiments at high-energy-density laser facilities.
  • We describe the CRASH (Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics) code, a block adaptive mesh code for multi-material radiation hydrodynamics. The implementation solves the radiation diffusion model with the gray or multigroup method and uses a flux limited diffusion approximation to recover the free-streaming limit. The electrons and ions are allowed to have different temperatures and we include a flux limited electron heat conduction. The radiation hydrodynamic equations are solved in the Eulerian frame by means of a conservative finite volume discretization in either one, two, or three-dimensional slab geometry or in two-dimensional cylindrical symmetry. An operator split method is used to solve these equations in three substeps: (1) solve the hydrodynamic equations with shock-capturing schemes, (2) a linear advection of the radiation in frequency-logarithm space, and (3) an implicit solve of the stiff radiation diffusion, heat conduction, and energy exchange. We present a suite of verification test problems to demonstrate the accuracy and performance of the algorithms. The CRASH code is an extension of the Block-Adaptive Tree Solarwind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code with this new radiation transfer and heat conduction library and equation-of-state and multigroup opacity solvers. Both CRASH and BATS-R-US are part of the publicly available Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF).
  • We study the classical problem of planar shock refraction at an oblique density discontinuity, separating two gases at rest. When the shock impinges on the density discontinuity, it refracts and in the hydrodynamical case 3 signals arise. Regular refraction means that these signals meet at a single point, called the triple point. After reflection from the top wall, the contact discontinuity becomes unstable due to local Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, causing the contact surface to roll up and develop the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. We present an exact Riemann solver based solution strategy to describe the initial self similar refraction phase, by which we can quantify the vorticity deposited on the contact interface. We investigate the effect of a perpendicular magnetic field and quantify how addition of a perpendicular magnetic field increases the deposition of vorticity on the contact interface slightly under constant Atwood number. We predict wave pattern transitions, in agreement with experiments, von Neumann shock refraction theory, and numerical simulations performed with the grid-adaptive code AMRVAC. These simulations also describe the later phase of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.
  • A robust second order, shock-capturing numerical scheme for multi-dimensional special relativistic magnetohydrodynamics on computational domains with adaptive mesh refinement is presented. The base solver is a total variation diminishing Lax-Friedrichs scheme in a finite volume setting and is combined with a diffusive approach for controlling magnetic monopole errors. The consistency between the primitive and conservative variables is ensured at all limited reconstructions and the spatial part of the four velocity is used as a primitive variable. Demonstrative relativistic examples are shown to validate the implementation. We recover known exact solutions to relativistic MHD Riemann problems, and simulate the shock-dominated long term evolution of Lorentz factor 7 vortical flows distorting magnetic island chains.
  • Extragalactic jets are inferred to harbor dynamically important, organized magnetic fields which presumably aid in the collimation of the relativistic jet flows. We here explore by means of grid-adaptive, high resolution numerical simulations the morphology of AGN jets pervaded by helical field and flow topologies. We concentrate on morphological features of the bow shock and the jet beam behind the Mach disk, for various jet Lorentz factors and magnetic field helicities. We investigate the influence of helical magnetic fields on jet beam propagation in overdense external medium. We use the AMRVAC code, employing a novel hybrid block-based AMR strategy, to compute ideal plasma dynamics in special relativity. The helicity of the beam magnetic field is effectively transported down the beam, with compression zones in between diagonal internal cross-shocks showing stronger toroidal field regions. In comparison with equivalent low-relativistic jets which get surrounded by cocoons with vortical backflows filled by mainly toroidal field, the high speed jets demonstrate only localized, strong toroidal field zones within the backflow vortical structures. We find evidence for a more poloidal, straight field layer, compressed between jet beam and backflows. This layer decreases the destabilizing influence of the backflow on the jet beam. In all cases, the jet beam contains rich cross-shock patterns, across which part of the kinetic energy gets transferred. For the high speed reference jet considered here, significant jet deceleration only occurs beyond distances exceeding ${\cal O}(100 R_j)$, as the axial flow can reaccelerate downstream to the internal cross-shocks. This reacceleration is magnetically aided, due to field compression across the internal shocks which pinch the flow.