• We cover some current topics in Beyond the Standard Model phenomenology, with an emphasis on collider (particularly Large Hadron Collider) phenomenology. We begin with a review of the Standard Model and some unresolved mysteries that it leaves. Then, we shall heuristically introduce supersymmetry, grand unified theories and extra dimensions as paradigms for expanding the Standard Model. The collider phenomenology of such models is too rich and complex to review, but we give some key examples of how the new states associated with the models might be inferred in Large Hadron Collider events. Before concluding, we finish with a brief description of a quantum field theory approximation that can be used in some cases to reduce model dependence: effective field theory. We show how this can be employed to explain recent measurements of decays of $B$ mesons, which disagree with Standard Model predictions.
  • We quantify and examine the uncertainties in predictions of the lightest $CP$ even Higgs boson pole mass $M_h$ in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), utilising current spectrum generators and including some three-loop corrections. There are two broadly different approximations being used: effective field theory (EFT) where an effective Standard Model (SM) is used below a supersymmetric mass scale, and a fixed order calculation, where the MSSM is matched to QCD$\times$QED at the electroweak scale. The uncertainties on the $M_h$ prediction in each approach are broken down into logarithmic and finite pieces. The inferred values of the stop mass parameters are sensitively dependent upon the precision of the prediction for $M_h$. The fixed order calculation appears to be more accurate below a supersymmetry (SUSY) mass scale of $M_S \approx 1.2$ TeV, whereas above this scale, the EFT calculation is more accurate. We also revisit the range of the lightest stop mass across fine-tuned parameter space that has an appropriate stable vacuum and is compatible with the lightest $CP$ even Higgs boson $h$ being identified with the one discovered at the ATLAS and CMS experiments in 2012; we achieve a maximum value of $\sim 10^{11}$ GeV.
  • Recent measurements in $B \to K^{(*)} \mu^+ \mu^-$ decays are somewhat discrepant with Standard Model predictions. They may be harbingers of new physics at an energy scale potentially accessible to direct discovery. We estimate the sensitivity of future hadron colliders to the possible new particles that may be responsible for the anomalies: leptoquarks or $Z^\prime$s. We consider luminosity upgrades for a 14 TeV LHC, a 33 TeV LHC, and a 100 TeV $pp$ collider such as the FCC-hh. Coverage of $Z^\prime$ models is excellent: for narrow particles, with perturbative couplings that may explain the $b$-decay results for $Z^\prime$ masses up to 20 TeV, a 33 TeV 1 ab$^{-1}$ LHC is expected to cover most of the parameter space up to 8 TeV in mass, whereas the 100 TeV FCC-hh with 10 ab$^{-1}$ will cover all of it. A smaller portion of the leptoquark parameter space is covered by future colliders: for example, in a $\mu^+\mu^-jj$ di-leptoquark search, a 100 TeV 10 ab$^{-1}$ collider has a projected sensitivity up to leptoquark masses of 12 TeV (extendable to 21 TeV with a strong coupling for single leptoquark production), whereas leptoquark masses up to 41 TeV may in principle explain the anomalies.
  • We describe a major extension of the SOFTSUSY spectrum calculator to include the calculation of the decays, branching ratios and lifetimes of sparticles into lighter sparticles, covering the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model (NMSSM) as well as the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). This document acts as a manual for the new version of SOFTSUSY, which includes the calculation of sparticle decays. We present a comprehensive collection of explicit expressions used by the program for the various partial widths of the different decay modes in the appendix.
  • We consider a modified Randall-Sundrum (RS) framework between the Planck scale and the GUT scale. In this scenario, RS works as a theory of flavour and not as a solution to the hierarchy problem. The latter is resolved by supersymmetrising the bulk, so that the minimal supersymmetric standard model being the effective 4-dimensional theory. Matter fields are localised in the bulk in order to fit fermion-mass and mixing-data. If $R$-parity violating terms are allowed in the superpotential, their orders of magnitude throughout flavour space are then predicted, resulting in rich flavour textures. If the $R$-parity violating contributions to neutrino masses are somewhat suppressed, then lepton-number violating models exist which explain the neutrino oscillation data while not being in contradiction with current experimental bounds. Another promising model is one where baryon number is violated and Dirac neutrino masses result solely from fermion localisation. We sketch the likely discovery signatures of the baryon-number and the lepton-number violating cases.
  • We perform a general analysis of new physics interpretations of the recent ATLAS diboson excesses over Standard Model expectations in LHC Run I collisions. Firstly, we estimate a likelihood function for the true signal in the $WW$, $WZ$, and $ZZ$ channels, finding that the maximum has zero events in the $WZ$ channel, though the likelihood is sufficiently flat to allow other scenarios. Secondly, we survey the possible effective field theories containing the Standard Model plus a new resonance that could explain the data, finding just two possibilities, viz., a vector that is either a left- or right-handed $SU(2)$ triplet. Finally, we compare these models with other experimental data and determine the parameter regions in which they provide a consistent explanation.
  • We revisit a simple model that combines minimal gauge mediation and the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model. We show that one can obtain a 125 GeV Standard Model-like Higgs boson with stops as light as 1.1 TeV, thanks to the mixing of the Higgs with a singlet state at O(90-100) GeV. Sparticle searches at the LHC may come with additional b-jets or taus and may involve displaced vertices. The sparticle production cross-section at the 13 TeV LHC can be O(10-100) fb, leading to great prospects for discovery in the early phase of LHC Run II.
  • Recent CMS searches for di-leptoquark production report local excesses of 2.4$\sigma$ in a $eejj$ channel and 2.6$\sigma$ in a $ejj$ missing $p_T$ channel. Here, we simultaneously explain both excesses with resonant slepton production in ${\mathcal R}-$parity violating supersymmetry (SUSY). We consider resonant slepton production, which decays to a lepton and a chargino/neutralino, followed by three-body decays of the neutralino/chargino via an $\mathcal{R}-$parity violating coupling. There are regions of parameter space which are also compatible at the 95% confidence level (CL) with a 2.8$\sigma$ $eejj$ excess in a recent CMS $W_R$ search, while being compatible with other direct search constraints. Phase-II of the GERDA neutrinoless double beta decay ($0\nu\beta\beta$) experiment will probe a sizeable portion of the good-fit region.
  • We explore the effects of three-loop minimal supersymmetric standard model renormalisation group equation terms and some leading two-loopthreshold corrections on gauge and Yukawa unification: each being one loop higher order than current public spectrum calculators. We also explore the effect of the higher order terms (often 2-3 GeV) on the lightest CP even Higgs mass prediction. We illustrate our results in the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model. Neglecting threshold corrections at the grand unified scale, the discrepancy between the unification scale $\alpha_s$ and the other two unified gauge couplings changes by 0.1$\%$ due to the higher order corrections and the difference between unification scale bottom-tau Yukawa couplings neglecting unification scale threshold corrections changes by up to 1$\%$. The difference between unification scale bottom and top Yukawa couplings changes by a few percent. Differences due to the higher order corrections also give an estimate of the size of theoretical uncertainties in the minimal supersymmetric standard model spectrum. We use these to provide estimates of theoretical uncertainties in predictions of the dark matter relic density (which can be of order one due to its strong dependence on sparticle masses) and the LHC sparticle production cross-section (often around 30$\%$). The additional higher order corrections have been incorporated into SOFTSUSY, and we provide details on how to compile and use the program. We also provide a summary of the approximations used in the higher order corrections.
  • We describe an extension to the SOFTSUSY program that provides for the calculation of the sparticle spectrum in the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM), where a chiral superfield that is a singlet of the Standard Model gauge group is added to the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) fields. Often, a $\mathbb{Z}_{3}$ symmetry is imposed upon the model. SOFTSUSY can calculate the spectrum in this case as well as the case where general $\mathbb{Z}_{3}$ violating (denoted as $\,\mathbf{\backslash}\mkern-11.0mu{\mathbb{Z}}_{3}$) terms are added to the soft supersymmetry breaking terms and the superpotential. The user provides a theoretical boundary condition for the couplings and mass terms of the singlet. Radiative electroweak symmetry breaking data along with electroweak and CKM matrix data are used as weak-scale boundary conditions. The renormalisation group equations are solved numerically between the weak scale and a high energy scale using a nested iterative algorithm. This paper serves as a manual to the NMSSM mode of the program, detailing the approximations and conventions used.
  • Recent work has shown that the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (CMSSM) can possess several distinct solutions for certain values of its parameters. The extra solutions were not previously found by public supersymmetric spectrum generators because fixed point iteration (the algorithm used by the generators) is unstable in the neighbourhood of these solutions. The existence of the additional solutions calls into question the robustness of exclusion limits derived from collider experiments and cosmological observations upon the CMSSM, because limits were only placed on one of the solutions. Here, we map the CMSSM by exploring its multi-dimensional parameter space using the shooting method, which is not subject to the stability issues which can plague fixed point iteration. We are able to find multiple solutions where in all previous literature only one was found. The multiple solutions are of two distinct classes. One class, close to the border of bad electroweak symmetry breaking, is disfavoured by LEP2 searches for neutralinos and charginos. The other class has sparticles that are heavy enough to evade the LEP2 bounds. Chargino masses may differ by up to around 10% between the different solutions, whereas other sparticle masses differ at the sub-percent level. The prediction for the dark matter relic density can vary by a hundred percent or more between the different solutions, so analyses employing the dark matter constraint are incomplete without their inclusion.
  • Weak-scale supersymmetry is a well motivated, if speculative, theory beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. It solves the thorny issue of the Higgs mass, namely: how can it be stable to quantum corrections, when they are expected to be $10^{15}$ times bigger than its mass? The experimental signal of the theory is the production and measurement of supersymmetric particles in the Large Hadron Collider experiments. No such particles have been seen to date, but hopes are high for the impending run in 2015. Searches for supersymmetric particles can be difficult to interpret. Here, we shall discuss the fact that, even given a well defined model of supersymmetry breaking with few parameters, there can be multiple solutions. These multiple solutions are physically different, and could potentially mean that points in parameter space have been ruled out by interpretations of LHC data when they shouldn't have been. We shall review the multiple solutions and illustrate their existence in a universal model of supersymmetry breaking.
  • When solving renormalisation group equations in a quantum field theory, one often specifies the boundary conditions at multiple renormalisation scales, such as the weak and grand-unified scales in a theory beyond the standard model. A point in the parameter space of such a model is usually specified by the values of couplings at these boundaries of the renormalisation group flow, but there is no theorem guaranteeing that such a point has a unique solution to the associated differential equations, and so there may exist multiple, phenomenologically distinct solutions, all corresponding to the same point in parameter space. We show that this is indeed the case in the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model (CMSSM), and we exhibit such solutions, which cannot be obtained using out-of-the-box computer programs in the public domain. Some of the multiple solutions we exhibit have CP-even lightest Higgs mass predictions between 124 and 126 GeV. Without an exhaustive 11-dimensional MSSM parameter scan per CMSSM parameter point to capture all of the multiple solutions, CMSSM phenomenological analyses are incomplete.
  • Different search strategies for supersymmetry have been employed by the LHC general-purpose experiments using early data. As proven by their early results, these strategies are promising, but raise the question of how well they will generalize for the future. We address this question by studying two thousand phenomenological minimal supersymmetric standard model parameter space points that come from a fit to indirect and cosmological data. We examine the 5 sigma discoverability of the points employing a typical ATLAS-type search based on missing transverse momentum (MET), a search based on an optimised MT2 cut and a combination of the two, taking into account standard model backgrounds. The discovery reach of the strategies can depend strongly on the systematic uncertainty in the background, subject to the stringency of the cuts and the details of the background simulation. By combining the MET and MT2 based strategies, with an integrated luminosity of 1 fb^-1 (10 fb^-1) at 7 TeV, 4-8% (42%) of the points are discoverable, depending on the systematic uncertainty on the background. At 14 TeV and with 10 fb^-1, 96% of the points are discoverable. While the majority of points can be discovered by both strategies at sqrt{s} = 14 TeV and with 1 fb^-1, there are some that are left undiscovered by a MET search strategy, but which are discovered by the MT2 strategy, and vice versa, therefore it is essential that one performs both in parallel. We discuss some of the factors that can make points more difficult to observe.
  • Recent CMS data significantly extend the direct search exclusion for supersymmetry. We examine the impact of such data on global fits of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model (CMSSM) to indirect and cosmological data. By simulating supersymmetric signal events at the LHC, we construct a likelihood map for the recent CMS data, validating it against the exclusion region calculated by the experiment itself. A previous CMSSM global fit is then re-weighted by our likelihood map. The CMS results nibble away at the high fit probability density region, transforming probability distributions for the scalar and gluino masses. The CMS search has a non-trivial effect on tan beta due to correlations between the parameters implied by the fits to indirect data.
  • Recent ATLAS data significantly extend the exclusion limits for supersymmetric particles. We examine the impact of such data on global fits of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model (CMSSM) to indirect and cosmological data. We calculate the likelihood map of the ATLAS search, taking into account systematic errors on the signal and on the background. We validate our calculation against the ATLAS determinaton of 95% confidence level exclusion contours. A previous CMSSM global fit is then re-weighted by the likelihood map, which takes a bite at the high probability density region of the global fit, pushing scalar and gaugino masses up.
  • We study the problem of selecting between different mechanisms of supersymmetry breaking in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model using current data. We evaluate the Bayesian evidence of four supersymmetry breaking scenarios: mSUGRA, mGMSB, mAMSB and moduli mediation. The results show a strong dependence on the dark matter assumption. Using the inferred cosmological relic density as an upper bound, minimal anomaly mediation is at least moderately favoured over the CMSSM. Our fits also indicate that evidence for a positive sign of the mu parameter is moderate at best. We present constraints on the anomaly and gauge mediated parameter spaces and some previously unexplored aspects of the dark matter phenomenology of the moduli mediation scenario. We use sparticle searches, indirect observables and dark matter observables in the global fit and quantify robustness with respect to prior choice. We quantify how much information is contained within each constraint.
  • We perform a global Bayesian fit of the phenomenological minimal supersymmetric standard model (pMSSM) to current indirect collider and dark matter data. The pMSSM contains the most relevant 25 weak-scale MSSM parameters, which are simultaneously fit using `nested sampling' Monte Carlo techniques in more than 15 years of CPU time. We calculate the Bayesian evidence for the pMSSM and constrain its parameters and observables in the context of two widely different, but reasonable, priors to determine which inferences are robust. We make inferences about sparticle masses, the sign of the $\mu$ parameter, the amount of fine tuning, dark matter properties and the prospects for direct dark matter detection without assuming a restrictive high-scale supersymmetry breaking model. We find the inferred lightest CP-even Higgs boson mass as an example of an approximately prior independent observable. This analysis constitutes the first statistically convergent pMSSM global fit to all current data.
  • An accord specifying a unique set of conventions for supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model together with generic file structures for 1) supersymmetric model specifications and input parameters, 2) electroweak scale supersymmetric mass and coupling spectra, and 3) decay tables is defined, to provide a universal interface between spectrum calculation programs, decay packages, and high energy physics event generators.
  • In the Bulk Randall-Sundrum model, the Kaluza-Klein excitations of the gauge bosons are the primary signatures. In particular, the search for the Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitation of the gluon at hadron colliders is of great importance in testing this model. At the leading order in QCD, the production of this KK-gluon proceeds only via q qbar-initial states. We study the production of KK-gluons from gluon initial states at next-to-leading order in QCD. We find that, even after including the sub-dominant KK-gluon loops at this order, the next-to-leading order (NLO) cross-section is tiny compared to the leading order cross-section and unlikely to impact the searches for this resonance at hardon colliders.
  • We study squark flavour violation in the anomaly mediated supersymmetry broken (AMSB) minimal supersymmetric standard model. Analytical expressions for the three-generational squark mass matrices are derived. We show that the anomaly-induced soft breaking terms have a decreasing amount of squark flavour violation when running from the GUT to the weak scale. Taking into account inter-generational squark mixing, we work out non-trivial constraints from B -> Xs gamma and Bs -> mu mu, which complement each other, as well as B -> tau nu decays. We further identify a region of parameter space where the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon and the B -> Xs gamma branching ratio are simultaneously accommodated. Since anomaly mediation is of the minimal flavour-violating type, the generic flavour predictions for this class of models apply, including a CKM-induced (and hence small) Bs-Bsbar-mixing phase.
  • We provide a bestiary of public codes and other algorithmic tools that can be used for analysing supersymmetric phenomenology. We also describe the organisation of the different tools and communication between them. Tools exist that calculate supersymmetric spectra and decay widths, simulate Monte Carlo events as well as those that make predictions of dark matter relic density or that predict precision electroweak or b-observables. Some global fitting tools for use in SUSY phenomenology are also presented. In each case, a description and a link to the relevant web-site is provided. It is hoped that this review could serve as an "entry-gate" and map for prospective users.
  • With sufficient data, Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments can constrain the selectron-smuon mass splitting through differences in the di-electron and di-muon edges from supersymmetry (SUSY) cascade decays. We study the sensitivity of the LHC to this mass splitting, which within mSUGRA may be constrained down to O(10^{-4}) for 30 fb^{-1} of integrated luminosity. Over substantial regions of SUSY breaking parameter space the fractional edge splitting can be significantly enhanced over the fractional mass splitting. Within models where the selectron and smuon are constrained to be universal at a high scale, edge splittings up to a few percent may be induced by renormalisation group effects and may be significantly discriminated from zero. The edge splitting provides important information about high-scale SUSY breaking terms and should be included in any fit of LHC data to high-scale models.
  • This collection of studies on new physics at the LHC constitutes the report of the supersymmetry working group at the Workshop `Physics at TeV Colliders', Les Houches, France, 2007. They cover the wide spectrum of phenomenology in the LHC era, from alternative models and signatures to the extraction of relevant observables, the study of the MSSM parameter space and finally to the interplay of LHC observations with additional data expected on a similar time scale. The special feature of this collection is that while not each of the studies is explicitely performed together by theoretical and experimental LHC physicists, all of them were inspired by and discussed in this particular environment.
  • This review presents flavour related issues in the production and decays of heavy states at LHC, both from the experimental side and from the theoretical side. We review top quark physics and discuss flavour aspects of several extensions of the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry, little Higgs model or models with extra dimensions. This includes discovery aspects as well as measurement of several properties of these heavy states. We also present public available computational tools related to this topic.