• We study the finite temperature transition in QCD with two flavors of dynamical fermions at a pseudoscalar pion mass of about 350 MeV. We use lattices with temporal extent of $N_t$=8, 10 and 12. For the first time in the literature a continuum limit is carried out for several observables with dynamical overlap fermions. These findings are compared with results obtained within the staggered fermion formalism at the same pion masses and extrapolated to the continuum limit. The presented results correspond to fixed topology and its effect is studied in the staggered case. Nice agreement is found between the overlap and staggered results.
  • The existence and stability of atoms rely on the fact that neutrons are more massive than protons. The measured mass difference is only 0.14\% of the average of the two masses. A slightly smaller or larger value would have led to a dramatically different universe. Here, we show that this difference results from the competition between electromagnetic and mass isospin breaking effects. We performed lattice quantum-chromodynamics and quantum-electrodynamics computations with four nondegenerate Wilson fermion flavors and computed the neutron-proton mass-splitting with an accuracy of $300$ kilo-electron volts, which is greater than $0$ by $5$ standard deviations. We also determine the splittings in the $\Sigma$, $\Xi$, $D$ and $\Xi_{cc}$ isospin multiplets, exceeding in some cases the precision of experimental measurements.
  • Electromagnetic effects are increasingly being accounted for in lattice quantum chromodynamics computations. Because of their long-range nature, they lead to large finite-size effects over which it is important to gain analytical control. Nonrelativistic effective field theories provide an efficient tool to describe these effects. Here we argue that some care has to be taken when applying these methods to quantum electrodynamics in a finite volume.
  • We study spin 1/2 isoscalar and isovector, even and odd parity candidates for the $\Theta^+(1540)$ pentaquark particle using large scale lattice QCD simulations. Previous lattice works led to inconclusive results because so far it has not been possible to unambiguously identify the known scattering spectrum and tell whether additionally a genuine pentaquark state also exists. Here we carry out this analysis using several possible wave functions (operators). Linear combinations of those have a good chance of spanning both the scattering and pentaquark states. Our operator basis is the largest in the literature, and it also includes spatially non-trivial ones with unit orbital angular momentum. The cross correlator we compute is 14$\times$14 with 60 non-vanishing elements. We can clearly distinguish the lowest scattering state(s) in both parity channels up to above the expected location of the pentaquark, but we find no trace of the latter. Based on that we conclude that there are most probably no pentaquark bound states at our quark masses, corresponding to $m_\pi$=400--630 MeV. However, we cannot rule out the existence of a pentaquark state at the physical quark mass corresponding to $m_\pi$=135 MeV or pentaquarks with a more exotic wave function.
  • We introduce a numerical method for generating the approximating polynomials used in fermionic calculations with smeared link actions. We investigate the stability of the algorithm and determine the optimal weight function and the optimal type of discretization. The achievable order of polynomial approximation reaches several thousands allowing fermionic calculations using the Hypercubic Smeared Link action even with physical quark masses.