• Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarimeters aspire to measure the faint $B$-mode signature predicted to arise from inflationary gravitational waves. They also have the potential to constrain cosmic birefringence which would produce non-zero expectation values for the CMB's $TB$ and $EB$ spectra. However, instrumental systematic effects can also cause these $TB$ and $EB$ correlations to be non-zero. In particular, an overall miscalibration of the polarization orientation of the detectors produces $TB$ and $EB$ spectra which are degenerate with isotropic cosmological birefringence, while also introducing a small but predictable bias on the $BB$ spectrum. The \bicep three-year spectra, which use our standard calibration of detector polarization angles from a dielectric sheet, are consistent with a polarization rotation of $\alpha = -2.77^\circ \pm 0.86^\circ \text{(statistical)} \pm 1.3^\circ \text{(systematic)}$. We revise the estimate of systematic error on the polarization rotation angle from the two-year analysis by comparing multiple calibration methods. We investigate the polarization rotation for the \bicep 100 GHz and 150 GHz bands separately to investigate theoretical models that produce frequency-dependent cosmic birefringence. We find no evidence in the data supporting either these models or Faraday rotation of the CMB polarization by the Milky Way galaxy's magnetic field. If we assume that there is no cosmic birefringence, we can use the $TB$ and $EB$ spectra to calibrate detector polarization orientations, thus reducing bias of the cosmological $B$-mode spectrum from leaked $E$-modes due to possible polarization orientation miscalibration. After applying this "self-calibration" process, we find that the upper limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio decreases slightly, from $r<0.70$ to $r<0.65$ at $95\%$ confidence.
  • Statistical measures of galaxy clusters are sensitive to neutrino masses in the sub-eV range. We explore the possibility of using cluster number counts from the ongoing PLANCK/SZ and future cosmic-variance-limited surveys to constrain neutrino masses from CMB data alone. The precision with which the total neutrino mass can be determined from SZ number counts is limited mostly by uncertainties in the cluster mass function and intracluster gas evolution; these are explicitly accounted for in our analysis. We find that projected results from the PLANCK/SZ survey can be used to determine the total neutrino mass with a (1\sigma) uncertainty of 0.06 eV, assuming it is in the range 0.1-0.3 eV, and the survey detection limit is set at the 5\sigma significance level. Our results constitute a significant improvement on the limits expected from PLANCK/CMB lensing measurements, 0.15 eV. Based on expected results from future cosmic-variance-limited (CVL) SZ survey we predict a 1\sigma uncertainty of 0.04 eV, a level comparable to that expected when CMB lensing extraction is carried out with the same experiment. A few percent uncertainty in the mass function parameters could result in up to a factor \sim 2-3 degradation of our PLANCK and CVL forecasts. Our analysis shows that cluster number counts provide a viable complementary cosmological probe to CMB lensing constraints on the total neutrino mass.
  • The standard cosmological model is assumed to respect parity symmetry. Under this assumption the cross-correlations of the CMB's temperature anisotropy and `gradient'-like polarization, with the `curl'-like polarization identically vanish over the full sky. However, extensions of the standard model which allow for light scalar field or axion coupling to the electromagnetic field, or coupling to the Riemann gravitational field-strength, as well as other modifications of field theories, may induce a rotation of the CMB polarization plane on cosmological scales and manifest itself as nonvanishing TB and EB cross-correlations. Recently, the degree of parity violation (reflected in polarization rotation) was constrained using data from BOOMERANG, WMAP and QUAD. Forecasts have been made for near-future experiments (e.g. PLANCK) to further constrain parity- and Lorentz-violating terms in the fundamental interactions of nature. Here we consider a real-world effect induced by a class of telescope beam systematics which can mimic the rotation of polarization plane or otherwise induce nonvanishing TB and EB correlations. In particular, adopting the viewpoint that the primary target of future experiments will be the inflationary B-mode signal, we assume the beam-systematics of the upcoming PLANCK and POLARBEAR experiments are optimized towards this goal, and explore the implications of the allowed levels of beam systematics on the resulting precision of polarization-rotation measurements.
  • The CMB's B-mode polarization provides a handle on several cosmological parameters most notably the tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r$, and is sensitive to parameters which govern the growth of large scale structure (LSS) and evolution of the gravitational potential. The primordial gravitational-wave- and secondary lensing-induced B-mode signals are very weak and therefore prone to various foregrounds and systematics. In this work we use Fisher-matrix-based estimations and apply, for the first time, Monte-Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) simulations to determine the effect of beam systematics on the inferred cosmological parameters from five upcoming experiments: PLANCK, POLARBEAR, SPIDER, QUIET+CLOVER and CMBPOL. We consider beam systematics which couple the beam substructure to the gradient of temperature anisotropy and polarization (differential beamwidth, pointing and ellipticity) and beam systematics due to differential beam normalization (differential gain) and orientation (beam rotation) of the polarization-sensitive axes (the latter two effects are insensitive to the beam substructure). We determine allowable levels of beam systematics for given tolerances on the induced parameter errors and check for possible biases in the inferred parameters concomitant with potential increases in the statistical uncertainty. All our results are scaled to the 'worst case scenario'. In this case and for our tolerance levels, the beam rotation should not exceed the few-degree to sub-degree level, typical ellipticity is required to be 1% level, the differential gain allowed level is a few parts in $10^{3}$ to $10^{4}$, differential beamwidth upper limits are of the sub-percent level and differential pointing should not exceed the few- to sub-arcsec level.
  • We examine the use of the CMB's TE cross correlation power spectrum as a complementary test to detect primordial gravitational waves (PGWs). The first method used is based on the determination of the lowest multipole, $\ell_0$, where the TE power spectrum, $C_{\ell}^{TE}$, first changes sign. The second method uses Wiener filtering on the CMB TE data to remove the density perturbations contribution to the TE power spectrum. In principle this leaves only the contribution of PGWs. We examine two toy experiments (one ideal and another more realistic) to see their ability to constrain PGWs using the TE power spectrum alone. We found that an ideal experiment, one limited only by cosmic variance, can detect PGWs with a ratio of tensor to scalar metric perturbation power spectra $r=0.3$ at 99.9% confidence level using only the TE correlation. This value is comparable with current constraints obtained by WMAP based on the $2\sigma$ upper limits to the B-mode amplitude. We demonstrate that to measure PGWs by their contribution to the TE cross correlation power spectrum in a realistic ground based experiment when real instrumental noise is taken into account, the tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r$, should be approximately three times larger.
  • In this paper we continue our study of CMB TE cross correlation as a source of information about primordial gravitational waves. In an accompanying paper, we considered the zero multipole method. In this paper we use Wiener filtering of the CMB TE data to remove the density perturbation contribution to the TE power spectrum. In principle this leaves only the contribution of PGWs. We examine two toy experiments (one ideal and one more realistic), to see how well they constrain PGWs using the TE power spectrum. We consider three tests applied to a combination of observational data and data sets generated by Monte Carlo simulations: (1) Signal-to-Noise test, (2) sign test, and (3) Wilcoxon rank sum test. We compare these tests with each other and with the zero multipole method. Finally, we compare the signal-to-noise ratio of TE correlation measurements first with corresponding signal-to-noise ratios for BB ground based measurements and later with current and future TE correlation space measurements. We found that an ideal TE correlation experiment limited only by cosmic variance can detect PGWs with a tensor-to-scalar ratio $r=0.3$ at 98% confidence level with the $S/N$ test, 93% confidence level with the sign test, and 80% confidence level for the Wilcoxon rank sum test. We also compare all results with corresponding results obtained using the zero multipole method. We demonstrate that to measure PGWs by their contribution to the TE cross correlation power spectrum in a realistic ground based experiment when real instrumental noise is taken into account, the tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r$, must be approximately four times larger. In the sense to detect PGWs, the zero multipole method is the best, next best is the S/N test, then the sign test, and the worst is the Wilcoxon rank sum test.
  • We describe the development of a bolometric receiver designed to measure the arcminute-scale polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The Polatron will be mounted at the Cassegrain focus of the 5.5 m telescope at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO). The receiver will measure both the Q and U Stokes parameters over a 20% pass-band centered near 100 GHz, with the input polarization signal modulated at ~0.6 Hz by a rotating, birefringent, quartz half-wave plate. In six months of observation we plan to observe ~400 2.5 arcminute pixels in a ring about the North Celestial Pole to a precision of ~6 \mu K/pixel in each of Q and U, adequate to unambiguously detect CMB polarization at levels predicted by current models.