• We present the first data release of the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE), an ambitious spectroscopic survey to measure radial velocities and stellar atmosphere parameters (temperature, metallicity, surface gravity) of up to one million stars using the 6dF multi-object spectrograph on the 1.2-m UK Schmidt Telescope of the Anglo-Australian Observatory (AAO). The RAVE program started in 2003, obtaining medium resolution spectra (median R=7,500) in the Ca-triplet region ($\lambda\lambda$ 8,410--8,795 \AA) for southern hemisphere stars drawn from the Tycho-2 and SuperCOSMOS catalogs, in the magnitude range 9<I<12. The first data release is described in this paper and contains radial velocities for 24,748 individual stars (25,274 measurements when including re-observations). Those data were obtained on 67 nights between 11 April 2003 to 03 April 2004. The total sky coverage within this data release is $\sim$4,760 square degrees. The average signal to noise ratio of the observed spectra is 29.5, and 80% of the radial velocities have uncertainties better than 3.4 km/s. Combining internal errors and zero-point errors, the mode is found to be 2 km/s. Repeat observations are used to assess the stability of our radial velocity solution, resulting in a variance of 2.8 km/s. We demonstrate that the radial velocities derived for the first data set do not show any systematic trend with color or signal to noise. The RAVE radial velocities are complemented in the data release with proper motions from Starnet 2.0, Tycho-2 and SuperCOSMOS, in addition to photometric data from the major optical and infrared catalogs (Tycho-2, USNO-B, DENIS and 2MASS). The data release can be accessed via the RAVE webpage: http://www.rave-survey.org.
  • We have used the 2dF instrument on the AAT to obtain redshifts of a sample of z<3, 18.0<g<21.85 quasars selected from SDSS imaging. These data are part of a larger joint programme: the 2dF-SDSS LRG and QSO Survey (2SLAQ). We describe the quasar selection algorithm and present the resulting luminosity function of 5645 quasars in 105.7 deg^2. The bright end number counts and luminosity function agree well with determinations from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey (2QZ) data to g\sim20.2. However, at the faint end the 2SLAQ number counts and luminosity function are steeper than the final 2QZ results from Croom et al. (2004), but are consistent with the preliminary 2QZ results from Boyle et al. (2000). Using the functional form adopted for the 2QZ analysis, we find a faint end slope of beta=-1.78+/-0.03 if we allow all of the parameters to vary and beta=-1.45+/-0.03 if we allow only the faint end slope and normalization to vary. Our maximum likelihood fit to the data yields 32% more quasars than the final 2QZ parameterization, but is not inconsistent with other g>21 deep surveys. The 2SLAQ data exhibit no well defined ``break'' but do clearly flatten with increasing magnitude. The shape of the quasar luminosity function derived from 2SLAQ is in good agreement with that derived from type I quasars found in hard X-ray surveys. [Abridged]
  • We have optically identified a sample of 56 featureless continuum objects without significant proper motion from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey (2QZ). The steep number--magnitude relation of the sample, $n(\bj) \propto 10^{0.7\bj}$, is similar to that derived for QSOs in the 2QZ and inconsistent with any population of Galactic objects. Follow up high resolution, high signal-to-noise, spectroscopy of five randomly selected objects confirms the featureless nature of these sources. Assuming the objects in the sample to be largely featureless AGN, and using the QSO evolution model derived for the 2QZ, we predict the median redshift of the sample to be $z=1.1$. This model also reproduces the observed number-magnitude relation of the sample using a renormalisation of the QSO luminosity function, $\Phi^* = \Phi^*_{\rm \sc qso}/66 \simeq 1.65 \times 10^{-8} $mag$^{-1}$Mpc$^{-3}$. Only $\sim$20 per cent of the objects have a radio flux density of $S_{1.4}>3 $mJy, and further VLA observations at 8.4 GHz place a $5\sigma$ limit of $S_{8.4} < 0.2$mJy on the bulk of the sample. We postulate that these objects could form a population of radio-weak AGN with weak or absent emission lines, whose optical spectra are indistinguishable from those of BL Lac objects.
  • We describe a method from which cosmology may be constrained from the 2QZ Survey. By comparing clustering properties parallel and perpendicular to the line of sight and by modeling the effects of redshift space distortions, we are able to study geometric distortions in the clustering pattern which occur if a wrong cosmology is assumed when translating redshifts into comoving distances. Using mock 2QZ catalogues, drawn from the Hubble Volume simulation, we find, that there is a degeneracy between the geometric and the redshift-space distortions that makes it difficult to obtain an unambiguous estimate of Omega_{m}(0) from the geometric tests alone. However, we demonstrate a new method to determine the cosmology which works by combining the above geometric test with a test based on the evolution of the QSO clustering amplitude. We find that we are able to break the degeneracy and that independent constraints to +-20% (1 sigma) accuracy on Omega_{m}(0) and +-10% (1 sigma) accuracy on beta_{QSO}(z) should be possible in the full 2QZ survey. Finally we apply the method to the 10k catalogue of 2QZ QSOs. The smaller number of QSOs and the current status of the Survey mean that a strong result on cosmology is not possible but we do constrain beta_{QSO}(z) to 0.35+-0.2. By combining this constraint with the further constraint available from the amplitude of QSO clustering, we find tentative evidence favouring a model with non-zero Omega_{Lambda}(0), although an Omega_{m}(0)=1 model provides only a marginally less good fit. A model with Omega_{Lambda}(0)=1 is ruled out. The results are in agreement with those found by Outram et al. using a similar analysis in Fourier space. (Abridged)
  • We present an analysis of the \rosat and \asca spectra of 21 broad line AGN (QSOs) with $z\sim 1$ detected in the 2-10 keV band with the \asca \gis. The summed spectrum in the \asca band is well described by a power-law with $\Gamma=1.56\pm0.18$, flatter that the average spectral index of bright QSOs and consistent with the spectrum of the X-ray background in this band. The flat spectrum in the \asca band could be explained by only a moderate absorption ($\sim 10^{22} \rm cm^{-2}$) assuming the typical AGN spectrum ie a power-law with $\Gamma$=1.9. This could in principle suggest that some of the highly obscured AGN, required by most X-ray background synthesis models, may be associated with normal blue QSOs rather than narrow-line AGN. However, the combined 0.5-8 keV \asca-\rosat spectrum is well fit by a power-law of $\Gamma=1.7\pm0.2$ with a spectral upturn at soft energies. It has been pointed out that such an upturn may be an artefact of uncertainties in the calibration of the ROSAT or ASCA detectors. Nevertheless if real, it could imply that the above absorption model suggested by the \asca data alone is ruled out. Then a large fraction of QSOs could have ``concave'' spectra ie they gradually steepen towards softer energies. This result is in agreement with the \bepposax hardness ratio analysis of $\sim$ 100 hard X-ray selected sources.
  • Galaxies in the environments of 69 0.2<z<0.7 UBR selected AGN have been imaged to Bj~23.5. By applying photometric redshifts and color selection criteria to the galaxy catalogue, the AGN-galaxy cross-correlation function has been measured as a function of galaxy type. The spatial cross-correlation of AGN with red (early-type) galaxies is comparable to the autocorrelation function of elliptical galaxies at low redshift. In contrast, the cross-correlation of AGN with blue (late-type) galaxies is weak and has been detected with low significance. As blue galaxies dominate Bj~23.5 galaxy catalogues, the cross-correlation of UBR selected AGN with all galaxies is weak at intermediate redshifts.
  • We present measurements of the angular correlation function of galaxies selected from a B_J=23.5 multicolour survey of two 5 degree by 5 degree fields located at high galactic latitudes. The galaxy catalogue of approximately 400,000 galaxies is comparable in size to catalogues used to determine the galaxy correlation function at low-redshift. Measurements of the z=0.4 correlation function at large angular scales show no evidence for a break from a power law though our results are not inconsistent with a break at >15 Mpc. Despite the large fields-of-view, there are large discrepancies between the measurements of the correlation function in each field, possibly due to dwarf galaxies within z=0.11 clusters near the South Galactic Pole. Colour selection is used to study the clustering of galaxies z=0 to z=0.4. The galaxy correlation function is found to strongly depend on colour with red galaxies more strongly clustered than blue galaxies by a factor of 5 at small scales. The slope of the correlation function is also found to vary with colour with gamma=1.8 for red galaxies while gamma=1.5 for blue galaxies. The clustering of red galaxies is consistently strong over the entire magnitude range studied though there are large variations between the two fields. The clustering of blue galaxies is extremely weak over the observed magnitude range with clustering consistent with r_0=2 Mpc. This is weaker than the clustering of late-type galaxies in the local Universe and suggests galaxy clustering is more strongly correlated with colour than morphology. This may also be the first detection of a substantial low redshift galaxy population with clustering properties similar to faint blue galaxies.
  • We present an analysis of X-ray variability in a flux limited sample of QSOs. Selected from our deep ROSAT survey, these QSOs span a wide range in redshift ($0.1<z<3.2$) and are typically very faint, so we have developed a method to constrain the amplitude of variability in ensembles of low signal-to-noise light curves. We find evidence for trends in this variability amplitude with both redshift and luminosity. The mean variability amplitude declines sharply with luminosity, as seen in local AGN, but with some suggestion of an upturn for the most powerful sources. We find tentative evidence that this is caused by redshift evolution, since the high redshift QSOs ($z>0.5$) do not show the anti-correlation with luminosity seen in local AGN. We speculate on the implications of these results for physical models of AGN and their evolution. Finally, we find evidence for X-ray variability in an object classified as a narrow emission-line galaxy, suggesting the presence of an AGN.
  • With approximately 6000 QSO redshifts,the 2dF QSO redshift survey is already the biggest complete QSO survey. The aim for the survey is to have 25000 QSO redshifts, providing an order of magnitude increase in QSO clustering statistics. We first describe the observational parameters of the 2dF QSO survey. We then describe several highlights of the survey so far, including new estimates of the QSO luminosity function and its evolution. We also review the current status of QSO clustering analyses from the 2dF data. Finally, we discuss how the complete QSO survey will be able to constrain the value of Omega_o by measuring the evolution of QSO clustering, place limits on the cosmological constant via a direct geometrical test and determine the form of the fluctuation power-spectrum out to the approximately 1000 Mpc scales only previously probed by COBE.
  • Using a sample of 165 X-ray selected QSOs from seven deep ROSAT fields we investigate the X-ray spectral properties of an ``average''radio-quiet broad line QSO as a function of redshift. The QSO stacked spectra, in the observers 0.1-2 keV band, in five redshift bins over the range 0.1<z<3.2 apparently harden from an equivalent photon index of 2.6 at z=0.4 to ~2.1 at z=2.4 as seen in other QSO samples. In contrast, the spectra in the 0.5-2 keV band show no significant variation in spectral index with redshift. This suggests the presence of a spectral upturn at low energies (<0.5 keV). Indeed, while at high redshifts (z>1.0) the single power-law model gives an acceptable fit to the data over the full energy band, at lower redshifts the spectra need a second component at low energies, a `soft excess'. Inclusion of a simple model for the soft excess, i.e. a black-body component (kT~100 eV), results in a significant improvement to the model fit, and yields power-law slopes of 1.8-1.9, for all redshift bins. This power-law is not inconsistent, within the error bars, with those of nearby AGN in the 2-10 keV band, suggesting that the same intrinsic power-law slope may continue from 10 keV down to below 0.5 keV. We caution that there is a possibility that the spectral upturn observed may not represent a real physical component but could be due to co-adding spectra with a large dispersion in spectral indices. Regardless of the origin of the soft excess, the average QSO spectrum has important consequences for the origin of the X-ray background: the average spectra of the typical, faint, high redshift QSO are significantly steeper than the spectrum of the X-ray background extending the spectral paradox into the soft 0.1-2 keV X-ray band.
  • We present the first results from a series of radio observations of the Hubble Deep Field South and its flanking fields. Here we consider only those sources greater than 100 microJy at 20 cm, in an 8-arcmin square field that covers the WFPC field, the STIS and NICMOS field, and most of the HST flanking fields and complementary ground-based observations. We have detected 13 such radio sources, two of which are in the WFPC2 field itself. One of the sources in the WFPC field (source c) corresponds to a very faint galaxy, and several others outside the WFPC field can not be identified with sources in the other optical/IR wavebands. The radio and optical luminosities of these galaxies are inconsistent with either conventional starburst galaxies or with radio-loud galaxies. Instead, it appears that it belongs to a population of galaxies which are rare in the local Universe, possibly consisting of a radio-luminous active nucleus embedded in a very dusty starburst galaxy, and which are characterised by a very high radio/optical luminosity ratio.
  • A great deal of interest has been generated recently by the results of deep submillimetre surveys, which in principle allow an unobscured view of dust-enshrouded star formation at high redshift. The extragalactic far-infrared and submillimetre backgrounds have also been detected, providing further constraints on the history of star formation. In this paper we estimate the fraction of these backgrounds and source counts which could be explained by AGN. The relative fractions of obscured and unobscured objects are constrained by the requirement that they fit the spectrum of the cosmic X-ray background. On the assumption that the spectral energy distributions of high redshift AGN are similar to those observed locally, we find that one can explain at least 10-20 per cent of the 850 micron SCUBA sources at 1mJy and a similar fraction of the far-infrared/submillimetre background. The exact contribution depends on the assumed cosmology and the space density of AGN at high redshift (z>3), but we conclude that active nuclei will be present in a significant (though not dominant) fraction of the faint SCUBA sources. This fraction could be significantly higher if a large population of AGN are highly obscured (Compton-thick) at X-ray wavelengths.
  • This presentation reports on first evidence for a low-mass-density/positive-cosmological-constant universe that will expand forever, based on observations of a set of 40 high-redshift supernovae. The experimental strategy, data sets, and analysis techniques are described. More extensive analyses of these results with some additional methods and data are presented in the more recent LBNL report #41801 (Perlmutter et al., 1998; accepted for publication in Ap.J.), astro-ph/9812133 . This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory reprint is a reduction of a poster presentation from the Cosmology Display Session #85 on 9 January 1998 at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Washington D.C. It is also available on the World Wide Web at http://supernova.LBL.gov/ This work has also been referenced in the literature by the pre-meeting abstract citation: Perlmutter et al., B.A.A.S., volume 29, page 1351 (1997).
  • We report measurements of the mass density, Omega_M, and cosmological-constant energy density, Omega_Lambda, of the universe based on the analysis of 42 Type Ia supernovae discovered by the Supernova Cosmology Project. The magnitude-redshift data for these SNe, at redshifts between 0.18 and 0.83, are fit jointly with a set of SNe from the Calan/Tololo Supernova Survey, at redshifts below 0.1, to yield values for the cosmological parameters. All SN peak magnitudes are standardized using a SN Ia lightcurve width-luminosity relation. The measurement yields a joint probability distribution of the cosmological parameters that is approximated by the relation 0.8 Omega_M - 0.6 Omega_Lambda ~= -0.2 +/- 0.1 in the region of interest (Omega_M <~ 1.5). For a flat (Omega_M + Omega_Lambda = 1) cosmology we find Omega_M = 0.28{+0.09,-0.08} (1 sigma statistical) {+0.05,-0.04} (identified systematics). The data are strongly inconsistent with a Lambda = 0 flat cosmology, the simplest inflationary universe model. An open, Lambda = 0 cosmology also does not fit the data well: the data indicate that the cosmological constant is non-zero and positive, with a confidence of P(Lambda > 0) = 99%, including the identified systematic uncertainties. The best-fit age of the universe relative to the Hubble time is t_0 = 14.9{+1.4,-1.1} (0.63/h) Gyr for a flat cosmology. The size of our sample allows us to perform a variety of statistical tests to check for possible systematic errors and biases. We find no significant differences in either the host reddening distribution or Malmquist bias between the low-redshift Calan/Tololo sample and our high-redshift sample. The conclusions are robust whether or not a width-luminosity relation is used to standardize the SN peak magnitudes.
  • We use UKIRT and ASCA observations to determine the nature of a high redshift (z=2.35) narrow-line AGN, previously discovered by Almaini et al. (1995). The UKIRT observations show a broad Halpha line while no Hbeta line is detected. This together with the red colour (B-K=5.4) suggest that our object is a moderately obscured QSO (Av>3), in optical wavelengths. The ASCA data suggest a hard spectrum, probably due to a large obscuring column, with a photon index of 1.93 (+0.62, -0.46), NH~10^23. The combined ASCA and ROSAT data again suggest a heavily obscured spectrum (NH~10^23 or Av~100). In this picture, the ROSAT soft X-ray emission may arise from electron scattering, in a similar fashion to local Seyfert 1.9. Then, there is a large discrepancy between the moderate reddening witnessed by the IR and the large X-ray absorbing column. This could be possibly explained on the basis of e.g. high gas metallicities or assuming that the X-ray absorbing column is inside the dust sublimation radius. An alternative explanation can be obtained when we allow for variability between the ROSAT and ASCA observations. Then the best fit spectrum is still flat, 1.35 (+0.16, -0.14), but with low intrinsic absorption in better agreement with the IR data, while the ROSAT normalization is a factor of two below the ASCA normalization. This object may be one of the bright examples of a type-II QSO population at high redshift, previously undetected in optical surveys. The hard X-ray spectrum of this object suggests that such a population could make a substantial contribution to the X-ray background.
  • We summarise our recent work on the faint galaxy contribution to the cosmic X-ray background (XRB). At bright X-ray fluxes (in the ROSAT pass band), broad line QSOs dominate the X-ray source population, but at fainter fluxes there is evidence for a significant contribution from emission-line galaxies. Here we present statistical evidence that these galaxies can account for a large fraction of the XRB. We also demonstrate that these galaxies have significantly harder X-ray spectra than QSOs. Finally we present preliminary findings from infra-red spectroscopy on the nature of this X-ray emitting galaxy population. We conclude that a hybrid explanation consisting of obscured/Type 2 AGN surrounded by starburst activity can explain the properties of these galaxies and perhaps the origin of the entire XRB.
  • We present multicolour images of the hosts of three z=2 QSOs previously detected in R-band by our group. The luminosities, colours and sizes of the hosts overlap with those of actively star-forming galaxies in the nearby Universe. Radial profiles over the outer resolved areas roughly follow de Vaucouleur or exponential disk laws. These properties give support to the host galaxy interpretation of the extended light around QSOs at high-redshift. The rest-frame UV colours and upper limits derived for the rest-frame UV-optical colours are inconsistent with the hypothesis of a scattered halo of light from the active nucleus by a simple optically-thin scattering process produced by dust or hot electrons. If the UV light is indeed stellar, star formation rates of hundreds of solar masses per year are implied, an order of magnitude larger than field galaxies at similar redshifts and above. This might indicate that the QSO phenomenon (at least the high-luminosity one) is preferentially acompanied by enhanced galactic activity at high-redshifts.
  • We present ASCA GIS observations (total exposure 100-200 ksec) of three fields which form part of our deep ROSAT survey. We detect 26 sources down to a limiting flux (2-10 keV) of 5x10^{-14} erg cm-2 s-1. Sources down to this flux level contribute 30 per cent of the 2-10 keV X-ray background. The number-count distribution, logN-logS, is a factor of three above the ROSAT counts, assuming a photon spectral index of 2 for the ROSAT sources. This suggests the presence at hard energies of a population other than the broad-line AGN which contribute to the ROSAT counts. This is supported by spectroscopic observations that show a large fraction of sources that are not obvious broad-line AGN. The average 1-10 keV spectral index of these sources is flat (0.92+-0.16), significantly different than that of the broad-line AGN (1.78+-0.16). Although some of the Narrow Emission Line Galaxies which are detected with ROSAT are also detected here, the nature of the flat spectrum sources remains as yet unclear.
  • We have been conducting an imaging survey to detect host galaxies of radio-quiet QSOs at high redshift (z = 2), in order to compare them with those of radio-loud objects. Six QSOs were observed in the R passband with the auxiliary port of the 4.2m WHT of the {\it Observatorio de Roque de los Muchachos} indir August 1994. The objects were selected to be bright (M(B) < -28$~mag) and have bright stars in the field, which could enable us to define the point spread function (PSF) accurately. The excellent seeing of La Palma (<0.9 arcsec thoughout the run) allowed us to detect extensions to the nuclear PSFs around three (one radio-loud and two radio-quiet) QSOs, out of 4 suitable targets. The extensions are most likely due to the host galaxies of these QSOs, with luminosities of at least 3-7% of the QSO luminosity. The most likely values for the luminosity of the host galaxies lie in the range 6-18% of the QSO luminosity. Our observations show that, if the extensions we have detected are indeed galaxies, extraordinary massive and luminous galaxies are not only a characteristic of radio-loud objects, but of QSOs as an entire class.
  • Based on an $R$-band imaging survey of high-redshift ($z \approx 2$) QSOs with the 4.2m WHT, we report the detection of extensions to the nuclear PSFs of two radio-quiet and one radio-loud QSO. The extensions are most likely host galaxies, with luminosities of at least $3-7$\% of the QSO luminosity. The most likely values for the luminosities lie in the range $6-18$\% of the QSO luminosity ($R \sim 19.8-20.9$~mag). Our observations show that, if the extensions we have detected are indeed galaxies, extraordinary massive and luminous galaxies are not only characteristic of radio-loud objects, but of QSOs as an entire class.
  • We report the discovery of a high redshift, narrow emission-line galaxy identified in the optical follow-up of deep ROSAT fields. The object has a redshift of z=2.35 and its narrow emission lines together with its high optical and X-ray luminosity imply that this is a rare example of a type 2 QSO. The intrinsic X-ray absorption is either very low or we are observing scattered flux which does not come directly from the nucleus. The X-ray spectrum of this object is harder than that of normal QSOs, and it is possible that a hitherto unidentified population of similar objects at fainter X-ray fluxes could account for the missing hard component of the X-ray background.
  • We have carried out an investigation of the galaxy environments of low redshift ($z<0.3$) QSOs by cross-correlating the positions on the sky of X-ray-selected QSOs/AGN identified in the {\it Einstein} Medium Sensitivity Survey (EMSS) with those of $B_J<20.5$ galaxies in the APM galaxy catalogues. At $<5\,$arcmin, we find a significant ($5\sigma$) galaxy excess around $z<0.3$ QSOs. The amplitude of the low redshift ($z<0.3$) QSO-galaxy angular cross-correlation function is identical to that of the APM galaxy angular correlation function, implying that these (predominantly radio-quiet) QSOs inhabit environments similar to those of normal galaxies. No significant galaxy excess was found around a `control' sample of $z>0.3$ QSOs. Coupled with previous observations, these results imply that the environment of radio-quiet QSOs undergoes little evolution over a wide range in redshift ($0 less than z less than 1.5$). This is in marked contrast to the rapid increase in the richness of the environments associated with radio-loud QSOs over the same redshift range. The similarity between QSO-galaxy clustering and galaxy-galaxy clustering also suggests that QSOs are unbiased with respect to galaxies and make useful tracers of large-scale structure in the Universe.