• We report measurements on yttrium iron garnet (YIG) thin films grown on both gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) and yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG) substrates, with and without thin Pt top layers. We provide three principal results: the observation of an interfacial region at the Pt/YIG interface, we place a limit on the induced magnetism of the Pt layer and confirm the existence of an interfacial layer at the GGG/YIG interface. Polarised neutron reflectometry (PNR) was used to give depth dependence of both the structure and magnetism of these structures. We find that a thin film of YIG on GGG is best described by three distinct layers: an interfacial layer near the GGG, around 5 nm thick and non-magnetic, a magnetic bulk phase, and a non-magnetic and compositionally distinct thin layer near the surface. We theorise that the bottom layer, which is independent of the film thickness, is caused by Gd diffusion. The top layer is likely to be extremely important in inverse spin Hall effect measurements, and is most likely Y2O3 or very similar. Magnetic sensitivity in the PNR to any induced moment in the Pt is increased by the existence of the Y2O3 layer; any moment is found to be less than 0.02 uB/atom.
  • The field of spin electronics (spintronics) was initiated by the discovery of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) for which Fert[1] and Grunberg[2] were awarded the 2007 Nobel Prize for Physics. GMR arises from differential scattering of the majority and minority spin electrons by a ferromagnet (FM) so that the resistance when the FM layers separated by non-magnetic (NM) spacers are aligned by an applied field is different to when they are antiparallel. In 1996 Slonczewski[3] and Berger[4] predicted that a large spin-polarised current could transfer spin-angular momentum and so exert a spin transfer torque (STT) sufficient to switch thin FM layers between stable magnetisation states[5] and, for even higher current densities, drive continuous precession which emits microwaves[6]. Thus, while GMR is a purely passive phenomenon which ultimately depends on the intrinsic band structure of the FM, STT adds an active element to spintronics by which the direction of the magnetisation may be manipulated. Here we show that highly non-equilibrium spin injection can modify the scattering asymmetry and, by extension, the intrinsic magnetism of a FM. This phenomenon is completely different to STT and provides a third ingredient which should further expand the range of opportunities for the application of spintronics.
  • Using a three-dimensional focused-ion beam lithography process we have fabricated nanopillar devices which show spin transfer torque switching at zero external magnetic fields. Under a small in-plane external bias field, a field-dependent peak in the differential resistance versus current is observed similar to that reported in asymmetrical nanopillar devices. This is interpreted as evidence for the low-field excitation of spin waves which in our case is attributed to a spin-scattering asymmetry enhanced by the IrMn exchange bias layer coupled to a relatively thin CoFe fixed layer.
  • We report on the structural, magnetic, and electron transport properties of a L1o-ordered epitaxial iron-platinum alloy layer fabricated by magnetron-sputtering on a MgO(001) substrate. The film studied displayed a long range chemical order parameter of S~0.90, and hence has a very strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. In the diffusive electron transport regime, for temperatures ranging from 2 K to 258 K, we found hysteresis in the magnetoresistance mainly due to electron scattering from magnetic domain walls. At 2 K, we observed an overall domain wall magnetoresistance of about 0.5 %. By evaluating the spin current asymmetry alpha = sigma_up / sigma_down, we were able to estimate the diffusive spin current polarization. At all temperatures ranging from 2 K to 258 K, we found a diffusive spin current polarization of > 80%. To study the ballistic transport regime, we have performed point-contact Andreev-reflection measurements at 4.2 K. We obtained a value for the ballistic current spin polarization of ~42% (which compares very well with that of a polycrystalline thin film of elemental Fe). We attribute the discrepancy to a difference in the characteristic scattering times for oppositely spin-polarized electrons, such scattering times influencing the diffusive but not the ballistic current spin polarization.
  • The properties of the archetypal Co/Cu giant magnetoresistance (GMR) spin-valve structure have been modified by the insertion of very thin (sub-monolayer) $\delta$-layers of various elements at different points within the Co layers, and at the Co/Cu interface. Different effects are observed depending on the nature of the impurity, its position within the periodic table, and its location within the spin-valve. The GMR can be strongly enhanced or suppressed for various specific combinations of these parameters, giving insight into the microscopic mechanisms giving rise to the GMR.
  • We use nanometer-sized point contacts to a Co/Cu spin valve to study the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) of only a few Co domains. The measured data show strong device-to-device differences of the GMR curve, which we attribute to the absence of averaging over many domains. The GMR ratio decreases with increasing bias current. For one particular device, this is accompanied by the development of two distinct GMR plateaus, the plateau level depending on bias polarity and sweep direction of the magnetic field. We attribute the observed behavior to current-induced changes of the magnetization, involving spin transfer due to incoherent emission of magnons and self-field effects.
  • The in-plane correlation lengths and magnetic disorder of magnetic domains in a transition metal multilayer have been studied using neutron scattering techniques. A new theoretical framework is presented connecting the observed scattering to the in-plane correlation length and the dispersion of the local magnetization vector about the mean macroscopic direction. The results unambiguously show the highly correlated nature of the antiferromagnetically coupled domain structure vertically throughout the multilayer. We are easily able to relate the neutron determined magnetic dispersion and domain correlations to magnetization and magnetotransport experiments.