• Using high-resolution data from the Galactic Arecibo L-Band Feed Array HI (GALFA-HI) survey, we show that linear structure in Galactic neutral hydrogen (HI) correlates with the magnetic field orientation implied by Planck 353 GHz polarized dust emission. The structure of the neutral interstellar medium is more tightly coupled to the magnetic field than previously known. At high Galactic latitudes, where the Planck data are noise-dominated, the HI data provide an independent constraint on the Galactic magnetic field orientation, and hence the local dust polarization angle. We detect strong cross-correlations between template maps constructed from estimates of dust intensity combined with either HI-derived angles, starlight polarization angles, or Planck 353 GHz angles. The HI data thus provide a new tool in the search for inflationary gravitational wave B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background, which is currently limited by dust foreground contamination.
  • We present a catalog of 5324 massive stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), with accurate spectral types compiled from the literature, and a photometric catalog for a subset of 3654 of these stars, with the goal of exploring their infrared properties. The photometric catalog consists of stars with infrared counterparts in the Spitzer, SAGE-SMC survey database, for which we present uniform photometry from 0.3-24 um in the UBVIJHKs+IRAC+MIPS24 bands. We compare the color magnitude diagrams and color-color diagrams to those of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), finding that the brightest infrared sources in the SMC are also the red supergiants, supergiant B[e] (sgB[e]) stars, luminous blue variables, and Wolf-Rayet stars, with the latter exhibiting less infrared excess, the red supergiants being less dusty and the sgB[e] stars being on average less luminous. Among the objects detected at 24 um are a few very luminous hypergiants, 4 B-type stars with peculiar, flat spectral energy distributions, and all 3 known luminous blue variables. We detect a distinct Be star sequence, displaced to the red, and suggest a novel method of confirming Be star candidates photometrically. We find a higher fraction of Oe and Be stars among O and early-B stars in the SMC, respectively, when compared to the LMC, and that the SMC Be stars occur at higher luminosities. We estimate mass-loss rates for the red supergiants, confirming the correlation with luminosity even at the metallicity of the SMC. Finally, we confirm the new class of stars displaying composite A & F type spectra, the sgB[e] nature of 2dFS1804 and find the F0 supergiant 2dFS3528 to be a candidate luminous blue variable with cold dust.
  • We present an analysis of late-O/early-B-powered, parsec-sized bubbles and associated star-formation using 2MASS, GLIMPSE, MIPSGAL and MAGPIS surveys. Three bubbles were selected from the Churchwell et al. (2007) catalog. We confirm that the structure identified in Watson et al. (2008) holds in less energetic bubbles, i.e. a PDR, identified by 8 um emission due to PAHs surrounds hot dust, identified by 24 um emission and ionized gas, identified by 20 cm continuum. We estimate the dynamical age of two bubbles by comparing bubble sizes to numerical models of Hosokawa & Inutsuka (2006). We also identify and analyze candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) using SED fitting and identify sites of possible triggered star-formation. Lastly, we identify likely ionizing sources for two sources based on SED fitting.
  • Using images from the Spitzer GLIMPSE Legacy survey, we have identified more than 300 extended 4.5 micron sources (abbreviated EGO, Extended Green Object, for the common coding of the [4.5] band as green in 3-color composite IRAC images). We present a catalog of these EGOs, including integrated flux density measurements at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, and 24 microns from the GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL surveys. The average angular separation between a source in our sample and the nearest IRAS point source is >1 arcminute. The majority of EGOs are associated with infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), and where high-resolution 6.7 GHz methanol maser surveys overlap the GLIMPSE coverage, EGOs and 6.7 GHz methanol masers are strongly correlated. Extended 4.5 micron emission is thought to trace shocked molecular gas in protostellar outflows; the association of EGOs with IRDCs and 6.7 GHz methanol masers suggests that extended 4.5 micron emission may pinpoint outflows specifically from massive protostars. The mid-infrared colors of EGOs lie in regions of color-color space occupied by young protostars still embedded in infalling envelopes.
  • We present an analysis of wind-blown, parsec-sized, mid-infrared bubbles and associated star-formation using GLIMPSE/IRAC, MIPSGAL/MIPS and MAGPIS/VLA surveys. Three bubbles from the Churchwell et al. (2006) catalog were selected. The relative distribution of the ionized gas (based on 20 cm emission), PAH emission (based on 8 um, 5.8 um and lack of 4.5 um emission) and hot dust (24 um emission) are compared. At the center of each bubble there is a region containing ionized gas and hot dust, surrounded by PAHs. We identify the likely source(s) of the stellar wind and ionizing flux producing each bubble based upon SED fitting to numerical hot stellar photosphere models. Candidate YSOs are also identified using SED fitting, including several sites of possible triggered star formation.
  • We determine and tabulate A(lambda)/A(K), the wavelength dependence of interstellar extinction, in the Galactic plane for 1.25um<lambda<8.0um along two lines of sight: l~42 and l~284. The first is a relatively quiescent and unremarkable region; the second contains the giant HII region RCW 49 as well as a ``field'' region unrelated to the cluster and nebulosity. Areas near these Galactic longitudes were imaged at J, H, and K bands by 2MASS and at 3--8um by Spitzer for the GLIMPSE Legacy program. We measure the mean values of the color excess ratios (A(lambda)-A(K))/(A(J)-A(K)) directly from the color distributions of observed stars. The extinction ratio between two of the filters, e.g. A(J)/A(K), is required to calculate A(lambda)/A(K) from those measured ratios. We use the apparent JHK magnitudes of giant stars along our two sightlines, and fit the reddening as a function of magnitude (distance) to determine A(J)/kpc, A(K)/kpc, and A(J)/A(K). Our values of A(lambda)/A(K) show a flattening across the 3--8um wavelength range, roughly consistent with the Lutz 1996 extinction measurements derived for the sightline toward the Galactic center.