• We present a 45 ks Chandra observation of the quasar ULAS J1342+0928 at z=7.54. We detect 14.0^{+4.8}_{-3.7} counts from the quasar in the observed-frame energy range 0.5-7.0 keV (6-sigma detection), representing the most distant non-transient astronomical source identified in X-rays to date. The present data are sufficient only to infer rough constraints on the spectral parameters. We find an X-ray hardness ratio of HR = -0.51^{+0.26}_{-0.28} between the 0.5-2.0 keV and 2.0-7.0 keV ranges and derive a power-law photon index of Gamma = 1.95^{+0.55}_{-0.53}. Assuming a typical value for high-redshift quasars of Gamma = 1.9, ULAS J1342+0928 has a 2-10 keV rest-frame X-ray luminosity of L_{2-10} = 11.6^{+4.3}_{-3.5} x 10^{44} erg/s. Its X-ray-to-optical power-law slope is alpha_{OX}=-1.67^{+0.16}_{-0.10}, consistent with the general trend indicating that the X-ray emission in the most bolometrically powerful quasars is weaker relative to their optical emission.
  • Luminous quasars at z>5.6 can be studied in detail with the current generation of telescopes and provide us with unique information on the first gigayear of the universe. Thus far these studies have been statistically limited by the number of quasars known at these redshifts. Such quasars are rare and therefore wide-field surveys are required to identify them and multiwavelength data are needed to separate them efficiently from their main contaminants, the far more numerous cool dwarfs. In this paper, we update and extend the selection for z~6 quasars presented in Banados et al. (2014) using the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) survey. We present the PS1 distant quasar sample, which currently consists of 124 quasars in the redshift range 5.6<z<6.7 that satisfy our selection criteria. Seventy-seven of these quasars have been discovered with PS1, and 63 of them are newly identified in this paper. We present composite spectra of the PS1 distant quasar sample. This sample spans a factor of ~20 in luminosity and shows a variety of emission line properties. The number of quasars at z>5.6 presented in this work almost double the quasars previously known at these redshifts, marking a transition phase from studies of individual sources to statistical studies of the high-redshift quasar population, which was impossible with earlier, smaller samples.
  • The [CII] 158$\mu$m fine-structure line is known to trace regions of active star formation and is the main coolant of the cold, neutral atomic medium. In this \textit{Letter}, we report a strong detection of the [CII] line in the host galaxy of the brightest quasar known at $z>6.5$, the Pan-STARRS1 selected quasar PSO J036.5078+03.0498 (hereafter P036+03), using the IRAM NOEMA millimeter interferometer. Its [CII] and total far-infrared luminosities are $(5.8 \pm 0.7) \times 10^9 \,L_\odot$ and $(7.6\pm1.5) \times 10^{12}\,L_\odot$, respectively. This results in a $L_{[CII]} /L_{TIR}$ ratio of $\sim 0.8\times 10^{-3}$, which is at the high end for those found for active galaxies, though it is lower than the average found in typical main sequence galaxies at $z\sim 0$. We also report a tentative additional line which we identify as a blended emission from the $3_{22} - 3_{13}$ and $5_{23} - 4_{32}$ H$_2$O transitions. If confirmed, this would be the most distant detection of water emission to date. P036+03 rivals the current prototypical luminous J1148+5251 quasar at $z=6.42$, in both rest-frame UV and [CII] luminosities. Given its brightness and because it is visible from both hemispheres (unlike J1148+5251), P036+03 has the potential of becoming an important laboratory for the study of star formation and of the interstellar medium only $\sim 800\,$Myr after the Big Bang.
  • Radio-loud Active Galactic Nuclei at z~2-4 are typically located in dense environments and their host galaxies are among the most massive systems at those redshifts, providing key insights for galaxy evolution. Finding radio-loud quasars at the highest accessible redshifts (z~6) is important to study their properties and environments at even earlier cosmic time. They would also serve as background sources for radio surveys intended to study the intergalactic medium beyond the epoch of reionization in HI 21 cm absorption. Currently, only five radio-loud ($R=f_{\nu,5{\rm GHz}}/f_{\nu,4400\AA}>10$) quasars are known at z~6. In this paper we search for 5.5 < z < 7.2 quasars by cross-matching the optical Pan-STARRS1 and radio FIRST surveys. The radio information allows identification of quasars missed by typical color-based selections. While we find no good 6.4 < z <7.2 quasar candidates at the sensitivities of these surveys, we discover two new radio-loud quasars at z~6. Furthermore, we identify two additional z~6 radio-loud quasars which were not previously known to be radio-loud, nearly doubling the current z~6 sample. We show the importance of having infrared photometry for z>5.5 quasars to robustly classify them as radio-quiet or radio-loud. Based on this, we reclassify the quasar J0203+0012 (z=5.72), previously considered radio-loud, to be radio-quiet. Using the available data in the literature, we constrain the radio-loud fraction of quasars at z~6, using the Kaplan--Meier estimator, to be $8.1^{+5.0}_{-3.2}\%$. This result is consistent with there being no evolution of the radio-loud fraction with redshift, in contrast to what has been suggested by some studies at lower redshifts.
  • High-redshift quasars are currently the only probes of the growth of supermassive black holes and potential tracers of structure evolution at early cosmic time. Here we present our candidate selection criteria from the Panoramic Survey Telescope & Rapid Response System 1 and follow-up strategy to discover quasars in the redshift range 5.7<z<6.2. With this strategy we discovered eight new 5.7<z<6.0 quasars, increasing the number of known quasars at z>5.7 by more than 10%. We additionally recovered 18 previously known quasars. The eight quasars presented here span a large range of luminosities (-27.3 < M_{1450} < -25.4; 19.6 < z_ps1 < 21.2) and are remarkably heterogeneous in their spectral features: half of them show bright emission lines whereas the other half show a weak or no Ly$\alpha$ emission line (25% with rest-frame equivalent width of the Ly$\alpha$ + Nv line lower than 15{\AA}). We find a larger fraction of weak-line emission quasars than in lower redshift studies. This may imply that the weak-line quasar population at the highest redshifts could be more abundant than previously thought. However, larger samples of quasars are needed to increase the statistical significance of this finding.
  • We present X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of the redshift z=7.084 radio-quiet quasar ULAS J112001.48+064124.3 obtained with Chandra and XMM-Newton. The quasar is detected as a point source with both observatories. The Chandra observation provides a precise position, confirming the association of the X-ray source and the quasar, while a sufficient number of photons is detected in the XMM-Newton observation to yield a meaningful X-ray spectrum. In the XMM-Newton observation the quasar has a 2-10 keV luminosity of 4.7+-0.9 times 10^44 erg/s and a spectral slope alpha = 1.6+0.4/-0.3 (where f_nu is proportional to nu^-alpha). The quasar appears to have dimmed in the 15 months between the two observations, with a 2-10 keV luminosity of $1.8+1.0/-0.7 times 10^45 erg/s during the Chandra observation. We derive optical to X-ray spectral slopes alpha_OX of 1.76+-0.07 and 1.54+0.09/-0.08 at the times of the XMM-Newton and Chandra observations respectively, consistent with the range of alpha_OX found in other quasars of comparable ultraviolet luminosity. The very soft X-ray spectrum suggests that the quasar is accreting above the Eddington rate, L/L_Edd = 5+15/-4, compared to L/L_Edd = 1.2+0.6/-0.5 derived from the rest-frame ultraviolet. Super-Eddington accretion would help to reduce the discrepancy between the age of the quasar implied by the small size of the ionized near zone in which it sits (<10^7 years), and the characteristic e-folding time (2.5 times 10^7 years if L/L_Edd=2). Such super-Eddington accretion would also alleviate the challenging constraints on the seed black hole mass provided that the quasar has been rapidly accreting throughout its history. The remnant of an individual population III star is a plausible progenitor if an average L/L_Edd>1.46 has been maintained over the quasar's lifetime.
  • The environment of the high-z radio galaxy PKS 1138-262 at z~2.2 is a prime example of a forming galaxy cluster. We use deep SINFONI data to perform a detailed study of the kinematics of the galaxies within 60 kpc of the radio core and we link this to the kinematics of the protocluster on the megaparsec scale. Identification of optical emission lines shows that 11 galaxies are at the redshift of the protocluster. The density of line emitters is more than an order of magnitude higher in the core of the protocluster than the larger scale environment. This implies a matter overdensity in the core of delta_m~70 which is similar to the outskirts of local galaxy clusters. The velocity distribution of the confirmed satellite galaxies shows a broad, double-peaked velocity structure with sigma=1360+/-206 km/s. A similar broad, double-peaked distribution was found in a previous study targeting the large scale protocluster structure, indicating that a common process is acting on both small and large scales. Including all spectroscopically confirmed protocluster galaxies, a velocity dispersion of 1013+/-87 km/s is found. We show that the protocluster has likely decoupled from the Hubble flow and is a dynamically evolved structure. Comparison to the Millenium simulation indicates that the protocluster velocity distribution is consistent with that of the most massive haloes at z~2, but we rule out that the protocluster is a fully virialized structure based on dynamical arguments and its X-ray luminosity. Comparison to merging haloes in the Millennium simulation shows that the structure as observed in and around the Spiderweb galaxy is best interpreted as being the result of a merger between two massive haloes. We propose that this merger can result in an increase in star formation and AGN activity in the protocluster core and is possibly an important stage in the evolution of massive cD galaxies.
  • This is a study of H-alpha emitters in two dense galaxy proto-clusters surrounding radio galaxies at z~2. We show that the proto-cluster surrounding MRC 1138-262 contains 14+/-2 times more H-alpha candidates than the average field (9 sigma significance), and the z=2.35 radio galaxy 4C+10.48 is surrounded by 12+/-2 times more emitters than the field (5 sigma), so it is also likely to reside in a dense proto-cluster environment. We compared these H-alpha emitters, situated in dense environments, to a control field sample selected from 3 separate fields forming a total area of 172 arcmin^2. We constructed and compared H-alpha and rest-frame R continuum luminosity functions of the emitters in both environments. The star formation density is on average 13 times greater in the proto-clusters than the field at z~2, so the total star formation rate within the central 1.5Mpc of the proto-clusters exceeds 3000Msun/yr. However, we found no significant difference in the shape of the H-alpha luminosity functions, implying that environment does not substantially affect the strength of the H-alpha line from strongly star forming galaxies. The proto-cluster emitters are typically 0.8mag brighter in rest-frame R continuum than field emitters, implying they are twice as massive as their field counterparts at the same redshift. We also show the proto-cluster galaxies have lower specific star formation rates than field galaxies, meaning the emitters in the dense environments formed more of their stars earlier than the field galaxies. We conclude that galaxy growth in the early Universe was accelerated in dense environments, and that cluster galaxies differed from field galaxies even before the cluster had fully formed.
  • We report the discovery of three very late T dwarfs in the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Third Data Release: ULAS J101721.40+011817.9 (ULAS1017), ULAS J123828.51+095351.3 (ULAS1238) and ULAS J133553.45+113005.2 (ULAS1335).We detail optical and near-infrared photometry for all three sources, and mid-infrared photometry for ULAS1335. We use near-infrared spectra of each source to assign spectral types T8p (ULAS1017), T8.5 (ULAS1228) and T9 (ULAS1335) to these objects. We estimate that ULAS1017 has 750 < Teff < 850K, and 5.0 < log g < 5.5, assuming solar metallicity, an age of 1.6-15 Gyr, a mass of 33-70 MJ and lies at a distance of 31-54 pc. We extend the unified scheme of Burgasser et al. (2006) to the type T9 and suggest the inclusion of the WJ index to replace the now saturated J-band indices. ULAS1335 is the same spectral type as ULAS J003402.77-005206.7 and CFBDS J005910.90-011401.3. Comparison of model spectra with that of ULAS1335 suggest a temperature below 600K. We find ULAS1335 to be extremely red in near to mid-infrared colours, with H-[4.49]=4.34+/-0.04. This is the reddest near to mid-infrared colour yet observed for a T dwarf, which supports Teff < 600K, and we estimate Teff ~550-600K for ULAS1335. We estimate that ULAS1335 has an age of 0.6-5.3 Gyr, a mass of 15-31 MJ and lies at a distance of 8-12 pc.
  • Venemans et al. (2005) found evidence for an overdensity of Ly-alpha emission line galaxies associated with the radio galaxy MRC 0316-257 at z=3.13 indicating the presence of a massive protocluster. Here, we present the results of a search for additional star-forming galaxies and AGN within the protocluster. Narrow-band infrared imaging was used to select candidate [O III] emitters in a 1.1 x 1.1 Mpc^2 region around the radio galaxy. Thirteen candidates have been detected. Four of these are among the previously confirmed sample of Ly-alpha galaxies, and an additional three have been confirmed through follow-up infrared spectroscopy. The three newly confirmed objects lie within a few hundred km/s of each other, but are blueshifted with respect to the radio galaxy and Ly-alpha emitters by ~2100 km/s. Although the sample is currently small, our results indicate that the radio-selected protocluster is forming at the centre of a larger, ~60 co-moving Mpc super-structure. On the basis of an HST/ACS imaging study we calculate dust-corrected star-formation rates and investigate morphologies and sizes of the [O III] candidate emitters. From a comparison of the star formation rate derived from UV-continuum and [O III] emission, we conclude that at least two of the [O III] galaxies harbour an AGN which ionized the O+ gas.
  • We present the discovery of fifteen new T2.5-T7.5 dwarfs (with estimated distances between ~24-93pc, identified in the first three main data releases of the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey. This brings the total number of T dwarfs discovered in the Large Area Survey (to date) to 28. These discoveries are confirmed by near infrared spectroscopy, from which we derive spectral types on the unified scheme of Burgasser et al. (2006). Seven of the new T dwarfs have spectral types of T2.5-T4.5, five have spectral types of T5-T5.5, one is a T6.5p, and two are T7-7.5. We assess spectral morphology and colours to identify T dwarfs in our sample that may have non-typical physical properties (by comparison to solar neighbourhood populations). The colours of the full sample of LAS T dwarfs show a possible trend to bluer Y-J with decreasing effective temperature beyond T8. By accounting for the main sources of incompleteness (selection, follow-up and spatial) as well as the effects of unresolved binarity and Malmquist bias, we estimate that there are 17+-4 >=T4 dwarfs in the J<=19 volume of the LAS second data release. Comparing this to theoretical predictions is most consistent with a sub-stellar mass function exponent alpha between -1.0 and 0. This is consistent with the latest 2MASS/SDSS constraint (which is based on lower number statistics), and is significantly lower than the alpha~1.0 suggested by L dwarf field populations, possibly a result of the lower mass range probed by the T dwarf class.
  • We present a deep image of the radio galaxy MRC 1138-262 taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) at a redshift of z = 2.2. The galaxy is known to have properties of a cD galaxy progenitor and be surrounded by a 3 Mpc-sized structure, identified with a protocluster. The morphology shown on the new deep HST/ACS image is reminiscent of a spider's web. More than 10 individual clumpy features are observed, apparently star-forming satellite galaxies in the process of merging with the progenitor of a dominant cluster galaxy 11 Gyr ago. There is an extended emission component, implying that star formation was occurring over a 50 times 40 kpc region at a rate of more than 100 M_sun/yr. A striking feature of the newly named ``Spiderweb galaxy'' is the presence of several faint linear galaxies within the merging structure. The dense environments and fast galaxy motions at the centres of protoclusters may stimulate the formation of these structures, which dominate the faint resolved galaxy populations in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The new image provides a unique testbed for simulations of forming dominant cluster galaxies.
  • Observations of the radio galaxy MRC 0316-257 at z=3.13 and the surrounding field are presented. Using narrow- and broad-band imaging obtained with the VLT, 77 candidate Ly-alpha emitters with a rest-frame equivalent width of > 15 A were selected in a ~7'x7' field around the radio galaxy. Spectroscopy of 40 candidate emitters resulted in the discovery of 33 emission line galaxies of which 31 are Ly-alpha emitters with redshifts similar to that of the radio galaxy, while the remaining two galaxies turned out to be [OII] emitters. The Ly-alpha profiles have widths (FWHM) in the range of 120-800 km/s, with a median of 260 km/s. Where the signal-to-noise was large enough, the Ly-alpha profiles were found to be asymmetric, with apparent absorption troughs blueward of the profile peaks, indicative of absorption along the line of sight of an HI mass of at least 2x10^2 - 5x10^4 M_sun. The properties of the Ly-alpha galaxies (faint, blue and small) are consistent with young star forming galaxies which are still nearly dust free. The volume density of Ly-alpha emitting galaxies in the field around MRC 0316-257 is a factor of 3.3+0.5-0.4 larger compared with the density of field Ly-alpha emitters at that redshift. The velocity distribution of the spectroscopically confirmed emitters has a FWHM of 1510 km/s, which is substantially smaller than the width of the narrow-band filter (FWHM ~ 3500 km/s). The peak of the velocity distribution is located within 200 km/s of the redshift of the radio galaxy. We conclude that the confirmed Ly-alpha emitters are members of a protocluster of galaxies at z~3.13. The size of the protocluster is larger than 3.3x3.3 Mpc^2. The mass of this structure is estimated to be > 3-6x10^14 M_sun and could be the progenitor of a cluster of galaxies similar to e.g. the Virgo cluster. (Abridged)
  • We present the results of narrow-band and broad-band imaging with the Very Large Telescope of the field surrounding the radio galaxy TN J0924-2201 at z = 5.2. Fourteen candidate Ly alpha emitters with a rest-frame equivalent width of > 20 A were detected. Spectroscopy of 8 of these objects showed that 6 have redshifts similar to that of the radio galaxy. The density of emitters at the redshift of the radio galaxy is estimated to be a factor 1.5-6.2 higher than in the field, and comparable to the density of Ly alpha emitters in radio galaxy protoclusters at z = 4.1, 3.1 and 2.2. The Ly alpha emitters near TN J0924-2201 could therefore be part of a structure that will evolve into a massive cluster. These observations confirm that substantial clustering of Ly alpha emitters occurs at z > 5 and support the idea that radio galaxies pinpoint high density regions in the early Universe.
  • We have recently discovered a forming cluster around the radio galaxy MRC 1138-262 at redshift 2.2. Besides the population of Ly alpha emitting galaxies that have been confirmed spectroscopically, we have detected many candidate H alpha emitters that seem to have a different spatial distribution from the other galaxies: they are more clustered towards the center of the cluster and seem to be distributed along the same direction as the radio source. We present here the characteristics of the Ly alpha and H alpha emitters and study the nature of these populations.
  • High redshift radio galaxies are amongst the most massive galaxies in the early Universe and have properties expected from central galaxies in forming clusters. We are carrying out an observational programme on the VLT to find and study galaxy proto clusters around radio galaxies at redshifts 2 < z < 4. First, we use narrow band imaging to select candidate galaxies which show excess Lyman alpha emission at redshifts similar to the central radio galaxy. Then, we use multi object spectroscopy to confirm the redshifts of these candidates and measure the velocity dispersion of the cluster members. Our goal is to observe a sample of about 10 targets and investigate galaxy overdensities as a function of redshift. Here, we report on the current progress of the programme and show some preliminary results which include the discovery of a structure of galaxies at redshift 4.1.