• The Advanced LIGO observatory recently reported the first direct detection of gravitational waves (GW) which triggered ALIGO on 2015 September 14. We report on observations taken with the Swift satellite two days after the trigger. No new X-ray, optical, UV or hard X-ray sources were detected in our observations, which were focussed on nearby galaxies in the GW error region and covered 4.7 square degrees (~2% of the probability in the rapidly-available GW error region; 0.3% of the probability from the final GW error region, which was produced several months after the trigger). We describe the rapid Swift response and automated analysis of the X-ray telescope and UV/Optical Telescope data, and note the importance to electromagnetic follow up of early notification of the progenitor details inferred from GW analysis.
  • We present a detailed study of the prompt and afterglow emission from Swift GRB 061126 using BAT, XRT, UVOT data and multi-color optical imaging from ten ground-based telescopes. GRB 061126 was a long burst (T_90=191 s) with four overlapping peaks in its gamma-ray light curve. The X-ray afterglow, observed from 26 min to 20 days after the burst, shows a simple power-law decay with alpha_X=1.290 \pm 0.008. Optical observations presented here cover the time range from 258 s (Faulkes Telescope North) to 15 days (Gemini North) after the burst; the decay rate of the optical afterglow shows a steep-to-shallow transition (from alpha_1=1.48 \pm 0.06 to alpha_2=0.88 \pm 0.03) approximately 13 min after the burst. We suggest the early, steep component is due to a reverse shock and show that the magnetic energy density in the ejecta, expressed as a fraction of the equipartion value, is a few ten times larger than in the forward shock in the early afterglow phase. The ejecta might be endowed with primordial magnetic fields at the central engine. The optical light curve implies a late-time break at about 1.5 days after the burst, while there is no evidence of the simultaneous break in the X-ray light curve. We model the broad band emission and show that some afterglow characteristics (the steeper decay in X-ray and the shallow spectral index from optical to X-ray) are difficult to explain in the framework of the standard fireball model. This might imply that the X-ray afterglow is due to an additional emission process, such as late time central engine activity rather than blast-wave shock emission. The possible chromatic break at 1.5 days after the burst would give support to the additional emission scenario.
  • We present a detailed analysis of the prompt and afterglow emission of GRB 050410 and GRB 050412 detected by Swift for which no optical counterpart was observed. The 15-150 keV energy distribution of the GRB 050410 prompt emission shows a peak energy at 53 keV. The XRT light curve of this GRB decays as a power law with a slope of alpha=1.06+/-0.04. The spectrum is well reproduced by an absorbed power law with a spectral index Gamma_x=2.4+/-0.4 and a low energy absorption N_H=4(+3;-2)x10^21 cm^(-2) which is higher than the Galactic value. The 15-150 keV prompt emission in GRB 050412 is modelled with a hard (Gamma=0.7+/-0.2) power law. The XRT light curve follows a broken power law with the first slope alpha_1=0.7+/-0.4, the break time T_break=254(-41;+79) s and the second slope alpha_2=2.8(-0.8;+0.5). The spectrum is fitted by a power law with spectral index Gamma_x=1.3+/-0.2 which is absorbed at low energies by the Galactic column. The GRB 050410 afterglow reveals the expected characteristics of the third component of the canonical Swift light curve. Conversely, a complex phenomenology was detected in the GRB 050412 because of the presence of the very early break. The light curve in this case can be interpreted as being the last peak of the prompt emission. The two bursts present tight upper limits for the optical emission, however, neither of them can be clearly classified as dark. For GRB 050410, the suppression of the optical afterglow could be attributed to a low density interstellar medium surrounding the burst. For GRB 050412, the evaluation of the darkness is more difficult due to the ambiguity in the extrapolation of the X-ray afterglow light curve.