• One-opposition near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) are growing in number, and they must be recovered to prevent loss and mismatch risk, and to improve their orbits, as they are likely to be too faint for detection in shallow surveys at future apparitions. We aimed to recover more than half of the one-opposition NEAs recommended for observations by the Minor Planet Center (MPC) using the Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) in soft-override mode and some fractions of available D-nights. During about 130 hours in total between 2013 and 2016, we targeted 368 NEAs, among which 56 potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs), observing 437 INT Wide Field Camera (WFC) fields and recovering 280 NEAs (76% of all targets). Engaging a core team of about ten students and amateurs, we used the THELI, Astrometrica, and the Find_Orb software to identify all moving objects using the blink and track-and-stack method for the faintest targets and plotting the positional uncertainty ellipse from NEODyS. Most targets and recovered objects had apparent magnitudes centered around V~22.8 mag, with some becoming as faint as V~24 mag. One hundred and three objects (representing 28% of all targets) were recovered by EURONEAR alone by Aug 2017. Orbital arcs were prolonged typically from a few weeks to a few years; our oldest recoveries reach 16 years. The O-C residuals for our 1,854 NEA astrometric positions show that most measurements cluster closely around the origin. In addition to the recovered NEAs, 22,000 positions of about 3,500 known minor planets and another 10,000 observations of about 1,500 unknown objects (mostly main-belt objects) were promptly reported to the MPC by our team. Four new NEAs were discovered serendipitously in the analyzed fields, increasing the counting to nine NEAs discovered by the EURONEAR in 2014 and 2015.
  • The age-metallicity relation (AMR) is a fundamental observational constraint for understanding how the Galactic disc formed and evolved chemically in time. However, there is not yet an agreement on the observational properties of the AMR for the solar neighbourhood, primarily due to the difficulty in obtaining accurate stellar ages for individual field stars. We have started an observational campaign for providing the much needed observational input by using wide white dwarf-main sequence (WDMS) binaries. White dwarfs are natural clocks and can be used to derive accurate ages. Metallicities can be obtained from the main sequence companions. Since the progenitors of white dwarfs and the main sequence stars were born at the same time, WDMS binaries provide a unique opportunity to observationally constrain in a robust way the properties of the AMR. In this work we present the AMR derived from analysing a pilot sample of 23 WDMS binaries and provide clear observational evidence for the lack of correlation between age and metallicity at young and intermediate ages (0-7 Gyrs).
  • White dwarfs are compact stars, similar in size to Earth but ~200,000 times more massive. Isolated white dwarfs emit most of their power from ultraviolet to near-infrared wavelengths, but when in close orbits with less dense stars, white dwarfs can strip material from their companions, and the resulting mass transfer can generate atomic line and X-ray emission, as well as near- and mid-infrared radiation if the white dwarf is magnetic. However, even in binaries, white dwarfs are rarely detected at far-infrared or radio frequencies. Here we report the discovery of a white dwarf / cool star binary that emits from X-ray to radio wavelengths. The star, AR Scorpii (henceforth AR Sco), was classified in the early 1970s as a delta-Scuti star, a common variety of periodic variable star. Our observations reveal instead a 3.56 hr period close binary, pulsing in brightness on a period of 1.97 min. The pulses are so intense that AR Sco's optical flux can increase by a factor of four within 30 s, and they are detectable at radio frequencies, the first such detection for any white dwarf system. They reflect the spin of a magnetic white dwarf which we find to be slowing down on a 10^7 yr timescale. The spin-down power is an order of magnitude larger than that seen in electromagnetic radiation, which, together with an absence of obvious signs of accretion, suggests that AR Sco is primarily spin-powered. Although the pulsations are driven by the white dwarf's spin, they originate in large part from the cool star. AR Sco's broad-band spectrum is characteristic of synchrotron radiation, requiring relativistic electrons. These must either originate from near the white dwarf or be generated in situ at the M star through direct interaction with the white dwarf's magnetosphere.
  • Detached WD+MS PCEBs are perhaps the most suitable objects for testing predictions of close-compact binary-star evolution theories, in particular, CE evolution. The population of WD+MS PCEBs has been simulated by several authors in the past and compared with observations. However, most of those predictions did not take the possible contributions to the envelope ejection from additional sources of energy (mostly recombination energy) into account. Here we update existing binary population models of WD+MS PCEBs by assuming that a fraction of the recombination energy available within the envelope contributes to ejecting the envelope. We performed Monte Carlo simulations of 10^7 MS+MS binaries for 9 different models using standard assumptions for the initial primary mass function, binary separations, and initial-mass-ratio distribution and evolved these systems using the publicly available BSE code. Including a fraction of recombination energy leads to a clear prediction of a large number of long orbital period (>~10 days) systems mostly containing high-mass WDs. The fraction of systems with He-core WD primaries increases with the CE efficiency and the existence of very low-mass He WDs is only predicted for high values of the CE efficiency (>~0.5). All models predict on average longer orbital periods for PCEBs containing C/O-core WDs than for PCEBs containing He WDs. This effect increases with increasing values of both efficiencies. Longer periods after the CE phase are also predicted for systems containing more massive secondary stars. The initial-mass-ratio distribution affects the distribution of orbital periods, especially the distribution of secondary star masses. Our simulations, in combination with a large and homogeneous observational sample, can provide constraints on the values of the CE efficiencies, as well as on the initial-mass-ratio distribution for MS+MS binary stars.
  • We present ULTRACAM photometry and X-Shooter spectroscopy of the eclipsing double white dwarf binary CSS 41177, the only such system that is also a double-lined spectroscopic binary. Combined modelling of the light curves and radial velocities yield masses and radii for both white dwarfs without the need to assume mass-radius relations. We find that the primary white dwarf has a mass of M1 = 0.38(2) Msun and a radius of R1 = 0.0222(4) Rsun. The secondary white dwarf's mass and radius are M2 = 0.32(1) Msun and R2 = 0.0207(4) Rsun, and its temperature and surface gravity (T2 = 11678(313) K, log(g2) = 7.32(2)) put it close to the white dwarf instability strip. However, we find no evidence for pulsations to roughly 0.5% relative amplitude. Both masses and radii are consistent with helium white dwarf models with thin hydrogen envelopes of 0.0001 Mstar. The two stars will merge in 1.14 Gyr due to angular momentum loss via gravitational wave emission.
  • Building on the experience of the high-resolution community with the suite of VLT high-resolution spectrographs, which has been tremendously successful, we outline here the (science) case for a high-fidelity, high-resolution spectrograph with wide wavelength coverage at the E-ELT. Flagship science drivers include: the study of exo-planetary atmospheres with the prospect of the detection of signatures of life on rocky planets; the chemical composition of planetary debris on the surface of white dwarfs; the spectroscopic study of protoplanetary and proto-stellar disks; the extension of Galactic archaeology to the Local Group and beyond; spectroscopic studies of the evolution of galaxies with samples that, unlike now, are no longer restricted to strongly star forming and/or very massive galaxies; the unraveling of the complex roles of stellar and AGN feedback; the study of the chemical signatures imprinted by population III stars on the IGM during the epoch of reionization; the exciting possibility of paradigm-changing contributions to fundamental physics. The requirements of these science cases can be met by a stable instrument with a spectral resolution of R~100,000 and broad, simultaneous spectral coverage extending from 370nm to 2500nm. Most science cases do not require spatially resolved information, and can be pursued in seeing-limited mode, although some of them would benefit by the E-ELT diffraction limited resolution. Some multiplexing would also be beneficial for some of the science cases. (Abridged)
  • The existence of water in extrasolar planetary systems is of great interest as it constrains the potential for habitable planets and life. Here, we report the identification of a circumstellar disk that resulted from the destruction of a water-rich and rocky, extrasolar minor planet. The parent body formed and evolved around a star somewhat more massive than the Sun, and the debris now closely orbits the white dwarf remnant of the star. The stellar atmosphere is polluted with metals accreted from the disk, including oxygen in excess of that expected for oxide minerals, indicating the parent body was originally composed of 26% water by mass. This finding demonstrates that water-bearing planetesimals exist around A- and F-type stars that end their lives as white dwarfs.
  • We have known for a long time that many of the measured white dwarf (WD) masses in cataclysmic variables (CVs) significantly exceed the mean mass of single WDs. This was thought to be related to observational biases, but recent high-precision measurements of WD masses in a great number of CVs are challenging this interpretation. We review the measured WD masses of CVs, determine the WD-mass distribution of an extensive sample of post-common-envelope binaries (PCEBs) that are representative for the progenitors of the current CV population (pre-CVs) and compare both distributions. We calculate the CV formation time of the PCEBs in our sample by determining the post common-envelope (CE) and the main-sequence evolution of the binary systems and define a pre-CV to be a PCEB that evolves into a semi-detached configuration with stable mass transfer within less than the age of the Galaxy. Possible observational biases affecting the WD-mass distribution for the pre-CV and the CV samples are discussed. The mean WD mass among CVs is <Mwd>=0.83\pm0.23 Msun, much larger than that found for pre-CVs, <Mwd>=0.67\pm0.21 Msun. Selection effects cannot explain the high WD masses observed in CVs and we here suggest two possible explanations, both of which imply substantial revisions to the standard model of CV evolution: either most CVs have formed above the orbital-period gap (which requires a high WD mass to initiate stable mass transfer or a previous phase of thermal-timescale mass transfer), or the mass of the WDs in CVs grows through accretion (which strongly disagrees with the predictions of classical nova models). Both options may imply that CVs contribute to the single-degenerate progenitors of Type Ia supernovae. The number of He-core WDs found in CVs (<=10%) is roughly consistent with the number of He-core WDs in pre-CVs (<=17+-8%), which indicates a low value of the CE efficiency.
  • Motivated by the recent discovery of an Halpha emission line component originating close to the white dwarf primary in the post-common-envelope binary (PCEB) LTT 560, we have undertaken a spectroscopic snapshot survey on 11 short-period (P_orb < 6 h) PCEBs using FORS2. We have found multi-component Halpha emission line profiles in six of our targets, indicating that multiple Halpha emission sites are rather common in short-period PCEBs. The underlying physical mechanisms, however, can be fundamentally different. In our sample we find one system where the extracted radial velocities of two identified components indicate that both originate in the late-type secondary star, where one is caused by irradiation from the hot white dwarf primary and the other by stellar activity. Another object presents two components that are located on opposite sides of the centre-of-mass, suggesting a case similar to LTT 560, i.e. that accretion of stellar wind from the secondary star produces Halpha emission on, or close to, the white dwarf.
  • Brown dwarf companions to white dwarfs are rare, but recent infra-red surveys are slowly reveal- ing examples. We present new observations of the post-common envelope binary WD0137-349, which reveals the effects of irradiation on the ~ 0.05M* secondary, and new observations of GD 1400 which show that it too is a close, post-comon envelope system. We also present the lat- est results in a near-infrared photometric search for unresolved ultracool companions and to white dwarfs with UKIDSS. Twenty five DA white dwarfs were identified as having photometric excesses indicative of a low mass companion, with 8-10 of these having a predicted mass in the range asso- ciated with brown dwarfs. The results of this survey show that the unresolved (< 2") brown dwarf companion fraction to DA white dwarfs is 0.3 \leq fWD+BD \leq 1.3%.
  • We have searched for evidence for dust and gas disks at a sample of hot DA white dwarfs 20 000K < Teff < 50 000K, without success. Although their atmospheres are polluted with heavy elements, we cannot yet convincingly and conclusively show that any of these objects is accreting metals from surrounding material derived from disrupted minor planets in an old solar system.
  • We present results from the final six months of a survey to search for pulsations in white dwarfs and hot subdwarf stars with the Kepler spacecraft. Spectroscopic observations are used to separate the objects into accurate classes, and we explore the physical parameters of the subdwarf B (sdB) stars and white dwarfs in the sample. From the Kepler photometry and our spectroscopic data, we find that the sample contains 5 new pulsators of the V1093 Her type, one AM CVn type cataclysmic variable, and a number of other binary systems. This completes the survey for compact pulsators with Kepler. No V361 Hya type of short-period pulsating sdB stars were found in this half, leaving us with a total of one single multiperiodic V361 Hya and 13 V1093 Her pulsators for the full survey. Except for the sdB pulsators, no other clearly pulsating hot subdwarfs or white dwarfs were found, although a few low-amplitude candidates still remain. The most interesting targets discovered in this survey will be observed throughout the remainder of the Kepler Mission, providing the most long-term photometric datasets ever made on such compact, evolved stars. Asteroseismic investigations of these datasets will be invaluable in revealing the interior structure of these stars, and will boost our understanding of their evolutionary history.
  • Reconstructing the evolution of post-common-envelope binaries (PCEBs) can constrain current prescriptions of common-envelope (CE) evolution. Analyzing a new sample of PCEBs we derive constraints on one of the most important parameters in the field of close compact binary formation, i.e. the CE efficiency alpha. After reconstructing the post-CE evolution and based on fits to stellar evolution calculations as well as a parametrized energy equation for CE evolution that incorporates realistic approximations of the binding energy parameter lambda, we determine the possible evolutionary histories of the observed PCEBs. We also reconstruct CE evolution replacing the classical energy equation with a scaled angular momentum equation and compare the results obtained with both algorithms. We find that all PCEBs in our sample can be reconstructed with the energy equation if the internal energy of the envelope is included. Although most individual systems have solutions for a broad range of values for alpha, only for alpha=0.2-0.3 do we find simultaneous solutions for all PCEBs in our sample. If we adjust alpha to this range of values, the values of the angular momentum parameter gamma cluster in a small range of values. In contrast if we fix gamma to a small range of values that allows us to reconstruct all our systems, the possible ranges of values for alpha remains broad for individual systems. The classical parametrized energy equation seems to be an appropriate prescription of CE evolution and turns out to constrain the outcome of the CE evolution much more than the alternative angular momentum equation. If there is a universal value of the CE efficiency, it should be in the range of alpha=0.2-0.3. We do not find any indications for a dependence of alpha on the mass of the secondary star or the final orbital period.
  • We present results from the first two quarters of a survey to search for pulsations in compact stellar objects with the Kepler spacecraft. The survey sample and the various methods applied in its compilation are described, and spectroscopic observations are presented to separate the objects into accurate classes. From the Kepler photometry we clearly identify nine compact pulsators, and a number of interesting binary stars. Of the pulsators, one shows the strong, rapid pulsations typical for a V361 Hya type sdB variable (sdBV), seven show long-period pulsations characteristic of V1093 Her type sdBVs, and one shows low-amplitude pulsations with both short and long periods. We derive effective temperatures and surface gravities for all the subdwarf B stars in the sample and demonstrate that below the boundary region where hybrid sdB pulsators are found, all our targets are pulsating. For the stars hotter than this boundary temperature a low fraction of strong pulsators (<10 per cent) is confirmed. Interestingly, the short-period pulsator also shows a low-amplitude mode in the long-period region, and several of the V1093 Her pulsators show low amplitude modes in the short-period region, indicating that hybrid behaviour may be common in these stars, also outside the boundary temperature region where hybrid pulsators have hitherto been found.
  • From optical photometry we show that SDSSJ121258.25-012310.1 is a new eclipsing, post common-envelope binary with an orbital period of 8.06 hours and an eclipse length of 23 minutes. We observed the object over 11 nights in different bands and determined the ephemeris of the eclipse to HJD_mid = 2454104. 7086(2) + 0.3358706(5) x E, where numbers in parenthesis indicate the uncertainties in the last digit. The depth of the eclipse is 2.85 +/- 0.17 mag in the V band, 1.82 +/- 0.08 mag in the R band and 0.52 +/- 0.02 mag in the I band. From spectroscopic observations we measured the semi-amplitude of the radial velocity K_2 = 181 +/- 3 km/s for the secondary star. The stellar and binary parameters of the system were constrained from a) fitting the SDSS composite spectrum of the binary, b) using a K-band luminosty-mass relation for the secondary star, and c) from detailed analyses of the eclipse light curve. The white dwarf has an effective temperature of 17700 +/- 300 K, and its surface gravity is logg =7.53 +/- 0.2. We estimate that the spectral type of the red dwarf is M4 +/- 1 and the distance to the system is 230 +/- 20 parsec. The mass of the secondary star is estimated to be in the range Msec = 0.26-0.29 Msun, while the mass of the white dwarf is most likely Mwd = 0.46-0.48 Msun. From an empirical mass-radius relation we estimate the radius of the red dwarf to be in the range 0.28-0.31 Rsun, whereas we get Rwd = 0.016-0.018 Rsun from a theoretical mass-radius realation. Finally we discuss the spectral energy distribution and the likely evolutionary state of SDSS1212-0123.
  • We present V and Rc band photometry and optical near-infrared spectroscopy of the cataclysmic variable 1RXS J094432.1+035738. We detected features of a cool secondary star, which can be modeled with a red dwarf of spectral type M2 (+0.5 -1.0) V at a distance of 433 +- 100 pc.
  • Time resolved spectroscopy of the Intermediate Polar FO Aqr reveals the presence of multiple periodicities in the UV range. A strong orbital modulation dominates both continuum and emission line flux variabilities, while line velocity motions are only detected at the rotational frequency. A prominent orbital periodicity is also observed in coordinated optical photometry, where FO Aqr was previously found to be spin dominated. The spectral dependence of the main periodicities shows the presence of multi-temperature components in FO Aqr and for the first time a hot and a cool component in the rotational modulation. From a comparison with previous UV and optical data obtained in 1990, no spectral variations in the orbital and rotational variabilities are detected, indicating no significant changes in the effects of X-ray illumination but rather a shrinking of the accretion curtain accompained by an increase in size of the thickened part of the accretion disc. These observations, consistent with the recently discovered long term trend in the X-ray pulsation amplitudes, independently confirm a change in the accretion mode in FO Aqr, which switched from a disc-fed into a disc-overflow state, likely triggered by mass accretion variations.