• We apply the method of self-adjoint extensions of Hermitian operators to the low-energy, continuum Hamiltonians of Weyl semimetals in bounded geometries and derive the spectrum of the surface states on the boundary. This allows for the full characterization of boundary conditions and the surface spectra on surfaces both normal to the Weyl node separation as well as parallel to it. We show that the boundary conditions for quadratic bulk dispersions are, in general, specified by a $\mathbb{U}(2)$ matrix relating the wavefunction and its derivatives normal to the surface. We give a general procedure to obtain the surface spectra from these boundary conditions and derive them in specific cases of bulk dispersion. We consider the role of global symmetries in the boundary conditions and their effect on the surface spectrum. We point out several interesting features of the surface spectra for different choices of boundary conditions, such as a Mexican-hat shaped dispersion on the surface normal to Weyl node separation. We find that the existence of bound states, Fermi arcs, and the shape of their dispersion, depend on the choice of boundary conditions. This illustrates the importance of the physics at and near the boundaries in the general statement of bulk-boundary correspondence.
  • In topological quantum computing, unitary operations on qubits are performed by adiabatic braiding of non-Abelian quasiparticles, such as Majorana zero modes, and are protected from local environmental perturbations. In the adiabatic regime, with timescales set by the inverse gap of the system, the errors can be made arbitrarily small by performing the process more slowly. To enhance the performance of quantum information processing with Majorana zero modes, we apply the theory of optimal control to the diabatic dynamics of Majorana-based qubits. While we sacrifice complete topological protection, we impose constraints on the optimal protocol to take advantage of the nonlocal nature of topological information and increase the robustness of our gates. By using the Pontryagin's maximum principle, we show that robust equivalent gates to perfect adiabatic braiding can be implemented in finite times through optimal pulses. In our implementation, modifications to the device Hamiltonian are avoided. Focusing on thermally isolated systems, we study the effects of calibration errors and external white and $1/f$ (pink) noise on Majorana-based gates. While a noise-induced antiadiabatic behavior, where a slower process creates more diabatic excitations, prohibits indefinite enhancement of the robustness of the adiabatic scheme, our fast optimal protocols exhibit remarkable stability to noise and have the potential to significantly enhance the practical performance of Majorana-based information processing.
  • We study the quantum dynamics of Majorana and regular fermion bound states coupled to a quasi-one-dimensional metallic lead. The dynamics following the quench in the coupling to the lead exhibits a series of dynamical revivals as the bound state propagates in the lead and reflects from the boundaries. We show that the nature of revivals for a single Majorana bound state depends uniquely on the presence of a resonant level in the lead. When two spatially separated Majorana modes are coupled to the lead, the revivals depend only on the phase difference between their host superconductors. Remarkably, the quench in this case effectively performs a fermion-parity interferometry between Majorana bound states, revealing their unique non-Abelian braiding. Using both analytical and numerical techniques, we find the pattern of fermion parity transfers following the quench, study its evolution in the presence of disorder and interactions, and thus, ascertain the fate of Majorana bound states in a Fermi sea.
  • Topological quantum phases of matter are characterized by an intimate relationship between the Hamiltonian dynamics away from the edges and the appearance of bound states localized at the edges of the system. Elucidating this correspondence in the continuum formulation of topological phases, even in the simplest case of a one-dimensional system, touches upon fundamental concepts and methods in quantum mechanics that are not commonly discussed in textbooks, in particular the self-adjoint extensions of a Hermitian operator. We show how such topological bound states can be derived in a prototypical one-dimensional system. Along the way, we provide a pedagogical exposition of the self-adjoint extension method as well as the role of symmetries in correctly formulating the continuum, field-theory description of topological matter with boundaries. Moreover, we show that self-adjoint extensions can be characterized generally in terms of a conserved local current associated with the self-adjoint operator.
  • Valley degrees of freedom offer a potential resource for quantum information processing if they can be effectively controlled. We discuss an optical approach to this problem in which intense light breaks electronic symmetries of a two-dimensional Dirac material. The resulting quasienergy structures may then differ for different valleys, so that the Floquet physics of the system can be exploited to produce highly polarized valley currents. This physics can be utilized to realize a valley valve whose behavior is determined optically. We propose a concrete way to achieve such valleytronics in graphene as well as in a simple model of an inversion-symmetry broken Dirac material. We study the effect numerically and demonstrate its robustness against moderate disorder and small deviations in optical parameters.
  • We develop a theory of topological transitions in a Floquet topological insulator, using graphene irradiated by circularly polarized light as a concrete realization. We demonstrate that a hallmark signature of such transitions in a static system, i.e. metallic bulk transport with conductivity of order $e^2/h$, is substantially suppressed at some Floquet topological transitions in the clean system. We determine the conditions for this suppression analytically and confirm our results in numerical simulations. Remarkably, introducing disorder dramatically enhances this transport by several orders of magnitude.
  • We show that Dirac fermions moving in two spatial dimensions with a generalized dispersion $E\sim p^N$, subject to an external magnetic field and coupled to a complex scalar field carrying a vortex defect with winding number $Q$ acquire $NQ$ zero modes. This is the same as in the absence of the magnetic field. Our proof is based on selection rules in the Landau level basis that dictate the existence and the number of the zero modes. We show that the result is insensitive to the choice of geometry and is naturally extended to general field profiles, where we also derive a generalization of the Aharonov-Casher theorem. Experimental consequences of our results are briefly discussed.
  • We propose a system of coupled quantum dots in proximity to a superconductor and driven by separate ac potentials to realize and detect Floquet Majorana fermions. We show that the appearance of Floquet Majorana fermions can be finely controlled in the expanded parameter space of the drive frequency, amplitude, and phase difference across the two dots. While these Majorana fermions are not topologically protected, the highly tunable setup provides a realistic system for observing the exotic physics associated with Majorana fermions as well as their dynamical generation and manipulation.
  • Floquet Majorana fermions are steady states of equal superposition of electrons and holes in a periodically driven superconductor. We study the experimental signatures of Floquet Majorana fermions in transport measurements and show, both analytically and numerically, that their presence is signaled by a quantized conductance sum rule over discrete values of lead bias differing by multiple absorption or emission energies at drive frequency. We also study the effects of static disorder and find that the quantized sum rule is robust against weak disorder. Thus, we offer a unique way to identify the topological signatures of Floquet Majorana fermions.
  • I study the effects of particle-hole imbalance on the exciton superfluid formed in a topological insulator thin-film and obtain the mean-field phase diagram. At finite imbalance a spatially modulated condensate is formed, akin to the Fulde-Ferrel-Larkin-Ovchinikov state in a superconductor, which preempts a first-order transition from the uniform condensate to the normal state at low temperatures. The imbalance can be tuned by changing the chemical potential at the two surfaces separately or, alternatively, by an asymmetric application of Zeeman fields at constant chemical potential. A vortex in the condensate carries a precisely fractional charge half of that of an electron. Possible experimental signatures for realistic parameters are discussed.
  • I study the edge states of the topological exciton condensate formed by Coulomb interaction between two parallel surfaces of a strong topological insulator. When the condensate is contacted by superconductors with a {\pi} phase shift across the two surfaces, a pair of counter-propagating Majorana modes close the gap at the boundary. I propose a nano-structured system of topological insulators and superconductors to realize unpaired Majorana fermions. The Majorana signal can be used to detect the formation of the topological exciton condensate. The relevant experimental signatures as well as implications for related systems are discussed.
  • We study the conditions for the existence of unpaired Majorana modes at the ends of vortex lines or the side edges of a layered topological superconductor. We show that the problem is mapped to that of a general Majorana chain and extend Kitaev's condition for the existence of its nontrivial phase by providing an additional condition when a supercurrent flows in the chain. Unpaired Majorana bound states may exist in a vortex line that threads the layers if the spin-orbit coupling has certain in-layer components but, interestingly, only if a nonzero supercurrent is maintained along the vortex. We discuss the exchange statistics of vortices in the presence of unpaired Majorana modes and comment on their experimental detection.
  • We propose a two-path vortex interferometry experiment based on the Aharonov-Casher effect for detecting the non-Abelian nature of vortices in a chiral p-wave superconductor. The effect is based on observing vortex interference patterns upon enclosing a finite charge of externally controllable magnitude within the interference path. We predict that when the interfering vortices enclose an odd number of identical vortices in their path, the interference pattern disappears only for non-Abelian vortices. When pairing involves two distinct spin species, we derive the mutual statistics between half quantum and full quantum vortices and show that, remarkably, our predictions still hold for the situation of a full quantum vortex enclosing a half quantum vortex in its path. We discuss the experimentally relevant conditions under which these effects can be observed.
  • In a Comment [arXiv:0910.1256], Behnia contends that the surface theory put forward in our recent Letter [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 136803 (2009); arXiv:0905.0689] as an alternative explanation of the anomalous peaks observed in Nernst measurement on a single-crystal bismuth sample at high (> 9 T) magnetic fields [Science 317, 1729 (2007); arXiv:0802.1993] is not consistent with the order of magnitude and shape of the anomalous peaks observed in the experiment. We explain in this Reply why this contention is not true.
  • Electrons in a metal subject to magnetic field commonly exhibit oscillatory behavior as the field strength varies, with a period set by the area of quantized electronic orbits. Recent experiments on elemental bismuth have revealed oscillations for fields above 9 tesla that do not follow this simple dependence and have been interpreted as a signature of electron fractionalization in the bulk. We argue instead that a simple explanation in terms of the surface states of bismuth exists when additional features of the experiment are included. These surface electrons are known to have significant spin-orbit interaction. We show the observed oscillations are in quantitative agreement with the surface theory, which we propose to test by studying the effect of the Zeeman coupling in higher fields, dependence on the field orientation, and the thickness of the samples.