• We introduce a new technique for reducing the dimension of the ambient space of low-degree polynomials in the Gaussian space while preserving their relative correlation structure, analogous to the Johnson-Lindenstrauss lemma. As applications, we address the following problems: 1. Computability of Approximately Optimal Noise Stable function over Gaussian space: The goal is to find a partition of $\mathbb{R}^n$ into $k$ parts, that maximizes the noise stability. An $\delta$-optimal partition is one which is within additive $\delta$ of the optimal noise stability. De, Mossel & Neeman (CCC 2017) raised the question of proving a computable bound on the dimension $n_0(\delta)$ in which we can find an $\delta$-optimal partition. While De et al. provide such a bound, using our new technique, we obtain improved explicit bounds on the dimension $n_0(\delta)$. 2. Decidability of Non-Interactive Simulation of Joint Distributions: A "non-interactive simulation" problem is specified by two distributions $P(x,y)$ and $Q(u,v)$: The goal is to determine if two players that observe sequences $X^n$ and $Y^n$ respectively where $\{(X_i, Y_i)\}_{i=1}^n$ are drawn i.i.d. from $P(x,y)$ can generate pairs $U$ and $V$ respectively (without communicating with each other) with a joint distribution that is arbitrarily close in total variation to $Q(u,v)$. Even when $P$ and $Q$ are extremely simple, it is open in several cases if $P$ can simulate $Q$. In the special where $Q$ is a joint distribution over $\{0,1\} \times \{0,1\}$, Ghazi, Kamath and Sudan (FOCS 2016) proved a computable bound on the number of samples $n_0(\delta)$ that can be drawn from $P(x,y)$ to get $\delta$-close to $Q$ (if it is possible at all). Recently De, Mossel & Neeman obtained such bounds when $Q$ is a distribution over $[k] \times [k]$ for any $k \ge 2$. We recover this result with improved explicit bounds on $n_0(\delta)$.
  • We study common randomness where two parties have access to i.i.d. samples from a known random source, and wish to generate a shared random key using limited (or no) communication with the largest possible probability of agreement. This problem is at the core of secret key generation in cryptography, with connections to communication under uncertainty and locality sensitive hashing. We take the approach of treating correlated sources as a critical resource, and ask whether common randomness can be generated resource-efficiently. We consider two notable sources in this setup arising from correlated bits and correlated Gaussians. We design the first explicit schemes that use only a polynomial number of samples (in the key length) so that the players can generate shared keys that agree with constant probability using optimal communication. The best previously known schemes were both non-constructive and used an exponential number of samples. In the amortized setting, we characterize the largest achievable ratio of key length to communication in terms of the external and internal information costs, two well-studied quantities in theoretical computer science. In the relaxed setting where the two parties merely wish to improve the correlation between the generated keys of length $k$, we show that there are no interactive protocols using $o(k)$ bits of communication having agreement probability even as small as $2^{-o(k)}$. For the related communication problem where the players wish to compute a joint function $f$ of their inputs using i.i.d. samples from a known source, we give a zero-communication protocol using $2^{O(c)}$ bits where $c$ is the interactive randomized public-coin communication complexity of $f$. This matches the lower bound shown previously while the best previously known upper bound was doubly exponential in $c$.
  • In a recent work (Ghazi et al., SODA 2016), the authors with Komargodski and Kothari initiated the study of communication with contextual uncertainty, a setup aiming to understand how efficient communication is possible when the communicating parties imperfectly share a huge context. In this setting, Alice is given a function $f$ and an input string $x$, and Bob is given a function $g$ and an input string $y$. The pair $(x,y)$ comes from a known distribution $\mu$ and $f$ and $g$ are guaranteed to be close under this distribution. Alice and Bob wish to compute $g(x,y)$ with high probability. The previous work showed that any problem with one-way communication complexity $k$ in the standard model has public-coin communication $O(k(1+I))$ bits in the uncertain case, where $I$ is the mutual information between $x$ and $y$. A lower bound of $\Omega(\sqrt{I})$ bits on the public-coin uncertain communication was also shown. An important question that was left open is the power that public randomness brings to uncertain communication. Can Alice and Bob achieve efficient communication amid uncertainty without using public randomness? How powerful are public-coin protocols in overcoming uncertainty? Motivated by these two questions: - We prove the first separation between private-coin uncertain communication and public-coin uncertain communication. We exhibit a function class for which the communication in the standard model and the public-coin uncertain communication are $O(1)$ while the private-coin uncertain communication is a growing function of the length $n$ of the inputs. - We improve the lower-bound of the previous work on public-coin uncertain communication. We exhibit a function class and a distribution (with $I \approx n$) for which the one-way certain communication is $k$ bits but the one-way public-coin uncertain communication is at least $\Omega(\sqrt{k} \cdot \sqrt{I})$ bits.
  • Several well-studied models of access to data samples, including statistical queries, local differential privacy and low-communication algorithms rely on queries that provide information about a function of a single sample. (For example, a statistical query (SQ) gives an estimate of $Ex_{x \sim D}[q(x)]$ for any choice of the query function $q$ mapping $X$ to the reals, where $D$ is an unknown data distribution over $X$.) Yet some data analysis algorithms rely on properties of functions that depend on multiple samples. Such algorithms would be naturally implemented using $k$-wise queries each of which is specified by a function $q$ mapping $X^k$ to the reals. Hence it is natural to ask whether algorithms using $k$-wise queries can solve learning problems more efficiently and by how much. Blum, Kalai and Wasserman (2003) showed that for any weak PAC learning problem over a fixed distribution, the complexity of learning with $k$-wise SQs is smaller than the (unary) SQ complexity by a factor of at most $2^k$. We show that for more general problems over distributions the picture is substantially richer. For every $k$, the complexity of distribution-independent PAC learning with $k$-wise queries can be exponentially larger than learning with $(k+1)$-wise queries. We then give two approaches for simulating a $k$-wise query using unary queries. The first approach exploits the structure of the problem that needs to be solved. It generalizes and strengthens (exponentially) the results of Blum et al.. It allows us to derive strong lower bounds for learning DNF formulas and stochastic constraint satisfaction problems that hold against algorithms using $k$-wise queries. The second approach exploits the $k$-party communication complexity of the $k$-wise query function.
  • In the "correlated sampling" problem, two players, say Alice and Bob, are given two distributions, say $P$ and $Q$ respectively, over the same universe and access to shared randomness. The two players are required to output two elements, without any interaction, sampled according to their respective distributions, while trying to minimize the probability that their outputs disagree. A well-known protocol due to Holenstein, with close variants (for similar problems) due to Broder, and to Kleinberg and Tardos, solves this task with disagreement probability at most $2 \delta/(1+\delta)$, where $\delta$ is the total variation distance between $P$ and $Q$. This protocol has been used in several different contexts including sketching algorithms, approximation algorithms based on rounding linear programming relaxations, the study of parallel repetition and cryptography. In this note, we give a surprisingly simple proof that this protocol is in fact tight. Specifically, for every $\delta \in (0,1)$, we show that any correlated sampling scheme should have disagreement probability at least $2\delta/(1+\delta)$. This partially answers a recent question of Rivest. Our proof is based on studying a new problem we call "constrained agreement". Here, Alice is given a subset $A \subseteq [n]$ and is required to output an element $i \in A$, Bob is given a subset $B \subseteq [n]$ and is required to output an element $j \in B$, and the goal is to minimize the probability that $i \neq j$. We prove tight bounds on this question, which turn out to imply tight bounds for correlated sampling. Though we settle basic questions about the two problems, our formulation also leads to several questions that remain open.
  • Establishing the complexity of {\em Bounded Distance Decoding} for Reed-Solomon codes is a fundamental open problem in coding theory, explicitly asked by Guruswami and Vardy (IEEE Trans. Inf. Theory, 2005). The problem is motivated by the large current gap between the regime when it is NP-hard, and the regime when it is efficiently solvable (i.e., the Johnson radius). We show the first NP-hardness results for asymptotically smaller decoding radii than the maximum likelihood decoding radius of Guruswami and Vardy. Specifically, for Reed-Solomon codes of length $N$ and dimension $K=O(N)$, we show that it is NP-hard to decode more than $ N-K- c\frac{\log N}{\log\log N}$ errors (with $c>0$ an absolute constant). Moreover, we show that the problem is NP-hard under quasipolynomial-time reductions for an error amount $> N-K- c\log{N}$ (with $c>0$ an absolute constant). These results follow from the NP-hardness of a generalization of the classical Subset Sum problem to higher moments, called {\em Moments Subset Sum}, which has been a known open problem, and which may be of independent interest. We further reveal a strong connection with the well-studied Prouhet-Tarry-Escott problem in Number Theory, which turns out to capture a main barrier in extending our techniques. We believe the Prouhet-Tarry-Escott problem deserves further study in the theoretical computer science community.
  • We present decidability results for a sub-class of "non-interactive" simulation problems, a well-studied class of problems in information theory. A non-interactive simulation problem is specified by two distributions $P(x,y)$ and $Q(u,v)$: The goal is to determine if two players, Alice and Bob, that observe sequences $X^n$ and $Y^n$ respectively where $\{(X_i, Y_i)\}_{i=1}^n$ are drawn i.i.d. from $P(x,y)$ can generate pairs $U$ and $V$ respectively (without communicating with each other) with a joint distribution that is arbitrarily close in total variation to $Q(u,v)$. Even when $P$ and $Q$ are extremely simple: e.g., $P$ is uniform on the triples $\{(0,0), (0,1), (1,0)\}$ and $Q$ is a "doubly symmetric binary source", i.e., $U$ and $V$ are uniform $\pm 1$ variables with correlation say $0.49$, it is open if $P$ can simulate $Q$. In this work, we show that whenever $P$ is a distribution on a finite domain and $Q$ is a $2 \times 2$ distribution, then the non-interactive simulation problem is decidable: specifically, given $\delta > 0$ the algorithm runs in time bounded by some function of $P$ and $\delta$ and either gives a non-interactive simulation protocol that is $\delta$-close to $Q$ or asserts that no protocol gets $O(\delta)$-close to $Q$. The main challenge to such a result is determining explicit (computable) convergence bounds on the number $n$ of samples that need to be drawn from $P(x,y)$ to get $\delta$-close to $Q$. We invoke contemporary results from the analysis of Boolean functions such as the invariance principle and a regularity lemma to obtain such explicit bounds.
  • We introduce a simple model illustrating the role of context in communication and the challenge posed by uncertainty of knowledge of context. We consider a variant of distributional communication complexity where Alice gets some information $x$ and Bob gets $y$, where $(x,y)$ is drawn from a known distribution, and Bob wishes to compute some function $g(x,y)$ (with high probability over $(x,y)$). In our variant, Alice does not know $g$, but only knows some function $f$ which is an approximation of $g$. Thus, the function being computed forms the context for the communication, and knowing it imperfectly models (mild) uncertainty in this context. A naive solution would be for Alice and Bob to first agree on some common function $h$ that is close to both $f$ and $g$ and then use a protocol for $h$ to compute $h(x,y)$. We show that any such agreement leads to a large overhead in communication ruling out such a universal solution. In contrast, we show that if $g$ has a one-way communication protocol with complexity $k$ in the standard setting, then it has a communication protocol with complexity $O(k \cdot (1+I))$ in the uncertain setting, where $I$ denotes the mutual information between $x$ and $y$. In the particular case where the input distribution is a product distribution, the protocol in the uncertain setting only incurs a constant factor blow-up in communication and error. Furthermore, we show that the dependence on the mutual information $I$ is required. Namely, we construct a class of functions along with a non-product distribution over $(x,y)$ for which the communication complexity is a single bit in the standard setting but at least $\Omega(\sqrt{n})$ bits in the uncertain setting.
  • Motivated by the quest for a broader understanding of communication complexity of simple functions, we introduce the class of "permutation-invariant" functions. A partial function $f:\{0,1\}^n \times \{0,1\}^n\to \{0,1,?\}$ is permutation-invariant if for every bijection $\pi:\{1,\ldots,n\} \to \{1,\ldots,n\}$ and every $\mathbf{x}, \mathbf{y} \in \{0,1\}^n$, it is the case that $f(\mathbf{x}, \mathbf{y}) = f(\mathbf{x}^{\pi}, \mathbf{y}^{\pi})$. Most of the commonly studied functions in communication complexity are permutation-invariant. For such functions, we present a simple complexity measure (computable in time polynomial in $n$ given an implicit description of $f$) that describes their communication complexity up to polynomial factors and up to an additive error that is logarithmic in the input size. This gives a coarse taxonomy of the communication complexity of simple functions. Our work highlights the role of the well-known lower bounds of functions such as 'Set-Disjointness' and 'Indexing', while complementing them with the relatively lesser-known upper bounds for 'Gap-Inner-Product' (from the sketching literature) and 'Sparse-Gap-Inner-Product' (from the recent work of Canonne et al. [ITCS 2015]). We also present consequences to the study of communication complexity with imperfectly shared randomness where we show that for total permutation-invariant functions, imperfectly shared randomness results in only a polynomial blow-up in communication complexity after an additive $O(\log \log n)$ overhead.
  • Random (dv,dc)-regular LDPC codes are well-known to achieve the Shannon capacity of the binary symmetric channel (for sufficiently large dv and dc) under exponential time decoding. However, polynomial time algorithms are only known to correct a much smaller fraction of errors. One of the most powerful polynomial-time algorithms with a formal analysis is the LP decoding algorithm of Feldman et al. which is known to correct an Omega(1/dc) fraction of errors. In this work, we show that fairly powerful extensions of LP decoding, based on the Sherali-Adams and Lasserre hierarchies, fail to correct much more errors than the basic LP-decoder. In particular, we show that: 1) For any values of dv and dc, a linear number of rounds of the Sherali-Adams LP hierarchy cannot correct more than an O(1/dc) fraction of errors on a random (dv,dc)-regular LDPC code. 2) For any value of dv and infinitely many values of dc, a linear number of rounds of the Lasserre SDP hierarchy cannot correct more than an O(1/dc) fraction of errors on a random (dv,dc)-regular LDPC code. Our proofs use a new stretching and collapsing technique that allows us to leverage recent progress in the study of the limitations of LP/SDP hierarchies for Maximum Constraint Satisfaction Problems (Max-CSPs). The problem then reduces to the construction of special balanced pairwise independent distributions for Sherali-Adams and special cosets of balanced pairwise independent subgroups for Lasserre. Some of our techniques are more generally applicable to a large class of Boolean CSPs called Min-Ones. In particular, for k-Hypergraph Vertex Cover, we obtain an improved integrality gap of $k-1-\epsilon$ that holds after a \emph{linear} number of rounds of the Lasserre hierarchy, for any k = q+1 with q an arbitrary prime power. The best previous gap for a linear number of rounds was equal to $2-\epsilon$ and due to Schoenebeck.
  • We present the first sample-optimal sublinear time algorithms for the sparse Discrete Fourier Transform over a two-dimensional sqrt{n} x sqrt{n} grid. Our algorithms are analyzed for /average case/ signals. For signals whose spectrum is exactly sparse, our algorithms use O(k) samples and run in O(k log k) time, where k is the expected sparsity of the signal. For signals whose spectrum is approximately sparse, our algorithm uses O(k log n) samples and runs in O(k log^2 n) time; the latter algorithm works for k=Theta(sqrt{n}). The number of samples used by our algorithms matches the known lower bounds for the respective signal models. By a known reduction, our algorithms give similar results for the one-dimensional sparse Discrete Fourier Transform when n is a power of a small composite number (e.g., n = 6^t).
  • For a given family of spatially coupled codes, we prove that the LP threshold on the BSC of the graph cover ensemble is the same as the LP threshold on the BSC of the derived spatially coupled ensemble. This result is in contrast with the fact that the BP threshold of the derived spatially coupled ensemble is believed to be larger than the BP threshold of the graph cover ensemble as noted by the work of Kudekar et al. (2011, 2012). To prove this, we establish some properties related to the dual witness for LP decoding which was introduced by Feldman et al. (2007) and simplified by Daskalakis et al. (2008). More precisely, we prove that the existence of a dual witness which was previously known to be sufficient for LP decoding success is also necessary and is equivalent to the existence of certain acyclic hyperflows. We also derive a sublinear (in the block length) upper bound on the weight of any edge in such hyperflows, both for regular LPDC codes and for spatially coupled codes and we prove that the bound is asymptotically tight for regular LDPC codes. Moreover, we show how to trade crossover probability for "LP excess" on all the variable nodes, for any binary linear code.