• This is the first in a series of papers examining the demographics of star-forming galaxies at $0.2<z<2.5$ in CANDELS. We study 9,100 galaxies from GOODS-S and UDS having published values of redshifts, masses, star-formation rates (SFRs), and dust attenuation ($A_V$) derived from UV-optical SED fitting. In agreement with previous works, we find that the $UVJ$ colors of a galaxy are closely correlated with its specific star-formation rate (SSFR) and $A_V$. We define rotated $UVJ$ coordinate axes, termed $S_\mathrm{SED}$ and $C_\mathrm{SED}$, that are parallel and perpendicular to the star-forming sequence and derive a quantitative calibration that predicts SSFR from $C_\mathrm{SED}$ with an accuracy of ~0.2 dex. SFRs from UV-optical fitting and from UV+IR values based on Spitzer/MIPS 24 $\mu\mathrm{m}$ agree well overall, but systematic differences of order 0.2 dex exist at high and low redshifts. A novel plotting scheme conveys the evolution of multiple galaxy properties simultaneously, and dust growth, as well as star-formation decline and quenching, exhibit "mass-accelerated evolution" ("downsizing"). A population of transition galaxies below the star-forming main sequence is identified. These objects are located between star-forming and quiescent galaxies in $UVJ$ space and have lower $A_V$ and smaller radii than galaxies on the main sequence. Their properties are consistent with their being in transit between the two regions. The relative numbers of quenched, transition, and star-forming galaxies are given as a function of mass and redshift.
  • Deep narrow-band surveys have revealed a large population of faint Lyman-alpha (Lya) emitters (LAEs) in the distant Universe, but relatively little is known about the most luminous sources ($L_{Ly\alpha}>10^{42.7}$ erg/s; $L_{Ly\alpha}>L^*_{Ly\alpha}$). Here we present the spectroscopic follow-up of 21 luminous LAEs at z~2-3 found with panoramic narrow-band surveys over five independent extragalactic fields (~4x10$^6$ Mpc$^{3}$ surveyed at z~2.2 and z~3.1). We use WHT/ISIS, Keck/DEIMOS and VLT/X-SHOOTER to study these sources using high ionisation UV lines. Luminous LAEs at z~2-3 have blue UV slopes ($\beta=-2.0^{+0.3}_{-0.1}$), high Lya escape fractions ($50^{+20}_{-15}$%) and span five orders of magnitude in UV luminosity ($M_{UV}\approx-19$ to -24). Many (70%) show at least one high ionisation rest-frame UV line such as CIV, NV, CIII], HeII or OIII], typically blue-shifted by ~100-200 km/s relative to Lya. Their Lya profiles reveal a wide variety of shapes, including significant blue-shifted components and widths from 200 to 4000 km/s. Overall, 60+-11% appear to be AGN dominated, and at $L_{Ly\alpha}>10^{43.3}$ erg/s and/or $M_{UV}<-21.5$ virtually all LAEs are AGN with high ionisation parameters (log U=0.6+-0.5) and with metallicities of ~0.5-1 Zsun. Those lacking signatures of AGN (40+-11%) have lower ionisation parameters ($\log U=-3.0^{+1.6}_{-0.9}$ and $\log\xi_{\rm ion}=25.4\pm0.2$) and are apparently metal-poor sources likely powered by young, dust-poor "maximal" starbursts. Our results show that luminous LAEs at z~2-3 are a diverse population and that 2xL$^*_{Ly\alpha}$ and 2xM$_{UV}^*$ mark a sharp transition in the nature of LAEs, from star formation dominated to AGN dominated.
  • We present a multi-wavelength catalog in the Subaru-XMM Deep Field (SXDF) as part of the Spitzer Large Area Survey with Hyper-Suprime-Cam (SPLASH). We include the newly acquired optical data from the Hyper-Suprime Cam Subaru Strategic Program, accompanied by IRAC coverage from the SPLASH survey. All available optical and near-infrared data is homogenized and resampled on a common astrometric reference frame. Source detection is done using a multi-wavelength detection image including the $u$-band to recover the bluest objects. We measure multi-wavelength photometry and compute photometric redshifts as well as stellar masses for $\sim$1.17 million objects over $\sim$4.2 deg$^2$ with $\sim$800,000 objects in the 2.4 deg$^2$ HSC-UltraDeep coverage. Using the available spectroscopic redshifts from various surveys over the range of $0<z<6$, we verify the performance of the photometric redshifts and we find a normalized median absolute deviation of 0.023 and outlier fraction of 3.2%. The SPLASH-SXDF catalog is a valuable, publicly available resource that is perfectly suited for studying galaxies in the early universe and tracing their evolution through cosmic time. The catalog is available for download from https://z.umn.edu/SXDF .
  • We combine spectroscopic measurements of H$\alpha$ and H$\beta$ and UV continuum photometry for a sample of 673 galaxies from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field survey to constrain hydrogen ionizing photon production efficiencies ($\xi_{\rm ion}$, xi_ion) at z=1.4-2.6. We find average log(xi_ion/[Hz erg$^{-1}$])=25.06 (25.34), assuming the Calzetti (SMC) curve for the UV dust correction and a scatter of 0.28 dex in xi_ion distribution. After accounting for observational uncertainties and variations in dust attenuation, we conclude that the remaining scatter in xi_ion is likely dominated by galaxy-to-galaxy variations in stellar populations, including the slope and upper-mass cutoff of the initial mass function, stellar metallicity, star-formation burstiness, and stellar evolution (e.g., single/binary star evolution). Moreover, xi_ion is elevated in galaxies with high ionization states (high [OIII]/[OII]) and low oxygen abundances (low [NII]/H$\alpha$ and high [OIII]/H$\beta$) in the ionized ISM. However, xi_ion does not correlate with the offset from the z~0 star-forming locus in the BPT diagram, suggesting no change in the hardness of ionizing radiation accompanying the offset from the z~0 sequence. We also find that galaxies with blue UV spectral slopes ($\langle\beta\rangle$=-2.1) have elevated xi_ion by a factor of ~2 relative to the average xi_ion of the sample ($\langle\beta\rangle$=-1.4). If these blue galaxies are similar to those at z > 6, our results suggest that a lower Lyman continuum escape fraction is required for galaxies to maintain reionization, compared to the canonical xi_ion predictions from stellar population models. Furthermore, we demonstrate that even with robustly dust-corrected H$\alpha$, the UV dust attenuation can cause on average a ~0.3dex systematic uncertainty in xi_ion calculations.
  • Using a novel approach, we study the quenching and bursting of galaxies as a function of stellar mass ($M_{*}$), local environment ($\Sigma$), and specific star-formation rate (sSFR) using a large spectroscopic sample of $\sim$ 123,000 $GALEX$/SDSS and $\sim$ 420 $GALEX$/COSMOS/LEGA-C galaxies to $z$ $\sim$ 1. We show that out to $z$ $\sim$ 1 and at fixed sSFR and local density, on average, less massive galaxies are quenching, whereas more massive systems are bursting, with a quenching/bursting transition at log($M_{*}$/$M_{\odot}$) $\sim$ 10.5-11 and likely a short quenching/bursting timescale ($\lesssim$ 300 Myr). We find that much of the bursting of star-formation happens in massive (log($M_{*}$/$M_{\odot}$) $\gtrsim$ 11), high sSFR galaxies (log(sSFR/Gyr$^{-1}$) $\gtrsim$ -2), particularly those in the field (log($\Sigma$/Mpc$^{-2}$) $\lesssim$ 0; and among group galaxies, satellites more than centrals). Most of the quenching of star-formation happens in low-mass (log($M_{*}$/$M_{\odot}$) $\lesssim$ 9), low sSFR galaxies (log(sSFR/Gyr$^{-1}$) $\lesssim$ -2), in particular those located in dense environments (log($\Sigma$/Mpc$^{-2}$) $\gtrsim$ 1), indicating the combined effects of $M_{*}$ and $\Sigma$ in quenching/bursting of galaxies since $z$ $\sim$ 1. However, we find that stellar mass has stronger effects than environment on recent quenching/bursting of galaxies to $z$ $\sim$ 1. At any given $M_{*}$, sSFR, and environment, centrals are quenchier (quenching faster) than satellites in an average sense. We also find evidence for the strength of mass and environmental quenching being stronger at higher redshift. Our preliminary results have potential implications for the physics of quenching/bursting in galaxies across cosmic time.
  • We examine the fraction of massive ($M_{*}>10^{10} M_{\odot}$), compact star-forming galaxies (cSFGs) that host an active galactic nucleus (AGN) at $z\sim2$. These cSFGs are likely the direct progenitors of the compact quiescent galaxies observed at this epoch, which are the first population of passive galaxies to appear in large numbers in the early Universe. We identify cSFGs that host an AGN using a combination of Hubble WFC3 imaging and Chandra X-ray observations in four fields: the Chandra Deep Fields, the Extended Groth Strip, and the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey field. We find that $39.2^{+3.9}_{-3.6}$\% (65/166) of cSFGs at $1.4<z<3.0$ host an X-ray detected AGN. This fraction is 3.2 times higher than the incidence of AGN in extended star-forming galaxies with similar masses at these redshifts. This difference is significant at the $6.2\sigma$ level. Our results are consistent with models in which cSFGs are formed through a dissipative contraction that triggers a compact starburst and concurrent growth of the central black hole. We also discuss our findings in the context of cosmological galaxy evolution simulations that require feedback energy to rapidly quench cSFGs. We show that the AGN fraction peaks precisely where energy injection is needed to reproduce the decline in the number density of cSFGs with redshift. Our results suggest that the first abundant population of massive, quenched galaxies emerged directly following a phase of elevated supermassive black hole growth and further hints at a possible connection between AGN and the rapid quenching of star formation in these galaxies.
  • We present results from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey on broad flux from the nebular emission lines H$\alpha$, [NII], [OIII], H$\beta$, and [SII]. The sample consists of 127 star-forming galaxies at $1.37 < z < 2.61$ and 84 galaxies at $2.95 < z < 3.80$. We decompose the emission lines using narrow ($\text{FWHM} < 275 \ \text{km s}^{-1}$) and broad ($\text{FWHM} > 300 \ \text{km s}^{-1}$) Gaussian components for individual galaxies and stacks. Broad emission is detected at $>3\sigma$ in $<10$% of galaxies and the broad flux accounts for 10-70% of the total flux. We find a slight increase in broad to narrow flux ratio with mass but note that we cannot reliably detect broad emission with $\text{FWHM} < 275 \ \text{km s}^{-1}$, which may be significant at low masses. Notably, there is a correlation between higher signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra and a broad component detection indicating a S/N dependence in our ability to detect broad flux. When placed on the N2-BPT diagram ([OIII]/H$\beta$ vs. [NII]/H$\alpha$) the broad components of the stacks are shifted towards higher [OIII]/H$\beta$ and [NII]/$\alpha$ ratios compared to the narrow component. We compare the location of the broad components to shock models and find that the broad component could be due to shocks, but we do not rule out other possibilities such as the presence of an AGN. We estimate the mass loading factor (mass outflow rate/star formation rate) assuming the broad component is a photoionized outflow and find that the mass loading factor increases as a function of mass which agrees with previous studies. We show that adding emission from shocked gas to $z\sim0$ SDSS spectra shifts galaxies towards the location of $z\sim2$ galaxies on several emission line diagnostic diagrams.
  • We present an analysis of 15 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) at redshift z > 1 (9 at 1.5 < z < 2.3) recently discovered in the CANDELS and CLASH Multi-Cycle Treasury programs using WFC3 on the Hubble Space Telescope. We combine these SNe Ia with a new compilation of 1050 SNe Ia, jointly calibrated and corrected for simulated survey biases to produce accurate distance measurements. We present unbiased constraints on the expansion rate at six redshifts in the range 0.07 < z < 1.5 based only on this combined SN Ia sample. The added leverage of our new sample at z > 1.5 leads to a factor of ~3 improvement in the determination of the expansion rate at z = 1.5, reducing its uncertainty to ~20%, a measurement of H(z=1.5)/H0=2.67 (+0.83,-0.52). We then demonstrate that these six measurements alone provide a nearly identical characterization of dark energy as the full SN sample, making them an efficient compression of the SN Ia data. The new sample of SNe Ia at z > 1 usefully distinguishes between alternative cosmological models and unmodeled evolution of the SN Ia distance indicators, placing empirical limits on the latter. Finally, employing a realistic simulation of a potential WFIRST SN survey observing strategy, we forecast optimistic future constraints on the expansion rate from SNe Ia.
  • Using observations from the first two years of the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey, we study 13 AGN-driven outflows detected from a sample of 67 X-ray, IR and/or optically-selected AGN at $z \sim 2$. The AGN have bolometric luminosities of $\sim10^{44}-10^{46} ~\mathrm{erg~s^{-1}}$, including both quasars and moderate-luminosity AGN. We detect blueshifted, ionized gas outflows in the H$\beta$ , [OIII], H$\alpha$ ~and/or [NII] emission lines of $19\%$ of the AGN, while only 1.8\% of the MOSDEF galaxies have similarly-detected outflows. The outflow velocities span $\sim$300 to 1000 km s$^{-1}$. Eight of the 13 outflows are spatially extended on similar scales as the host galaxies, with spatial extents of 2.5 to 11.0 kpc. Outflows are detected uniformly across the star-forming main sequence, showing little trend with the host galaxy SFR. Line ratio diagnostics indicate that the outflowing gas is photoionized by the AGN. We do not find evidence for positive AGN feedback, in either our small MOSDEF sample or a much larger SDSS sample, using the BPT diagram. Given that a galaxy with an AGN is ten times more likely to have a detected outflow, the outflowing gas is photoionzed by the AGN, and estimates of the mass and energy outflow rates indicate that stellar feedback is insufficient to drive at least some of these outflows, they are very likely to be AGN-driven. The outflows have mass-loading factors of the order of unity, suggesting that they help regulate star formation in their host galaxies, though they may be insufficient to fully quench it.
  • We present the first spectroscopic measurement of multiple rest-frame optical emission lines at $z>4$. During the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey, we observed the galaxy GOODSN-17940 with the Keck I/MOSFIRE spectrograph. The K-band spectrum of GOODSN-17940 includes significant detections of the [OII]$\lambda\lambda 3726,3729$, [NeIII]$\lambda3869$, and H$\gamma$ emission lines and a tentative detection of H$\delta$, indicating $z_{\rm{spec}}=4.4121$. GOODSN-17940 is an actively star-forming $z>4$ galaxy based on its K-band spectrum and broadband spectral energy distribution. A significant excess relative to the surrounding continuum is present in the Spitzer/IRAC channel 1 photometry of GOODSN-17940, due primarily to strong H$\alpha$ emission with a rest-frame equivalent width of $\mbox{EW(H}\alpha)=1200$ \AA. Based on the assumption of $0.5 Z_{\odot}$ models and the Calzetti attenuation curve, GOODSN-17940 is characterized by $M_*=5.0^{+4.3}_{-0.2}\times 10^9 M_{\odot}$. The Balmer decrement inferred from H$\alpha$/H$\gamma$ is used to dust correct the H$\alpha$ emission, yielding $\mbox{SFR(H}\alpha)=320^{+190}_{-140} M_{\odot}\mbox{ yr}^{-1}$. These $M_*$ and SFR values place GOODSN-17940 an order of magnitude in SFR above the $z\sim 4$ star-forming "main sequence." Finally, we use the observed ratio of [NeIII]/[OII] to estimate the nebular oxygen abundance in GOODSN-17940, finding $\mbox{O/H}\sim 0.2 \mbox{ (O/H)}_{\odot}$. Combining our new [NeIII]/[OII] measurement with those from stacked spectra at $z\sim 0, 2, \mbox{ and } 3$, we show that GOODSN-17940 represents an extension to $z>4$ of the evolution towards higher [NeIII]/[OII] (i.e., lower $\mbox{O/H}$) at fixed stellar mass. It will be possible to perform the measurements presented here out to $z\sim 10$ using the James Webb Space Telescope.
  • We present spectroscopic follow-up of candidate luminous Ly$\alpha$ emitters (LAEs) at $z=5.7-6.6$ in the SA22 field with VLT/X-SHOOTER. We confirm two new luminous LAEs at $z=5.676$ (SR6) and $z=6.532$ (VR7), and also present {\it HST} follow-up of both sources. These sources have luminosities L$_{\rm Ly\alpha} \approx 3\times10^{43}$ erg s$^{-1}$, very high rest-frame equivalent widths of EW$_0\gtrsim 200$ {\AA} and narrow Ly$\alpha$ lines (200-340 km s$^{-1}$). VR7 is the most UV-luminous LAE at $z>6.5$, with M$_{1500} = -22.5$, even brighter in the UV than CR7. Besides Ly$\alpha$, we do not detect any other rest-frame UV lines in the spectra of SR6 and VR7, and argue that rest-frame UV lines are easier to observe in bright galaxies with low Ly$\alpha$ equivalent widths. We confirm that Ly$\alpha$ line-widths increase with Ly$\alpha$ luminosity at $z=5.7$, while there are indications that Ly$\alpha$ lines of faint LAEs become broader at $z=6.6$, potentially due to reionisation. We find a large spread of up to 3 dex in UV luminosity for $>L^{\star}$ LAEs, but find that the Ly$\alpha$ luminosity of the brightest LAEs is strongly related to UV luminosity at $z=6.6$. Under basic assumptions, we find that several LAEs at $z\approx6-7$ have Ly$\alpha$ escape fractions $\gtrsim100$ \%, indicating bursty star-formation histories, alternative Ly$\alpha$ production mechanisms, or dust attenuating Ly$\alpha$ emission differently than UV emission. Finally, we present a method to compute $\xi_{ion}$, the production efficiency of ionising photons, and find that LAEs at $z\approx6-7$ have high values of log$_{10}(\xi_{ion}$/Hz erg$^{-1}) \approx 25.51\pm0.09$ that may alleviate the need for high Lyman-Continuum escape fractions required for reionisation.
  • We explore observational and theoretical constraints on how galaxies might transition between the "star-forming main sequence" (SFMS) and varying "degrees of quiescence" out to $z=3$. Our analysis is focused on galaxies with stellar mass $M_*>10^{10}M_{\odot}$, and is enabled by GAMA and CANDELS observations, a semi-analytic model (SAM) of galaxy formation, and a cosmological hydrodynamical "zoom in" simulation with momentum-driven AGN feedback. In both the observations and the SAM, transition galaxies tend to have intermediate S\'ersic indices, half-light radii, and surface stellar mass densities compared to star-forming and quiescent galaxies out to $z=3$. We place an observational upper limit on the average population transition timescale as a function of redshift, finding that the average high-redshift galaxy is on a "fast track" for quenching whereas the average low-redshift galaxy is on a "slow track" for quenching. We qualitatively identify four physical origin scenarios for transition galaxies in the SAM: oscillations on the SFMS, slow quenching, fast quenching, and rejuvenation. Quenching timescales in both the SAM and the hydrodynamical simulation are not fast enough to reproduce the quiescent population that we observe at $z\sim3$. In the SAM, we do not find a clear-cut morphological dependence of quenching timescales, but we do predict that the mean stellar ages, cold gas fractions, SMBH masses, and halo masses of transition galaxies tend to be intermediate relative to those of star-forming and quiescent galaxies at $z<3$.
  • We investigate the clustering properties of $\sim 7000$ H$\beta$+[OIII] and [OII] narrowband-selected emitters at $z \sim 0.8 - 4.7$ from the High-$z$ Emission Line Survey. We find clustering lengths, $r_0$, of $1.5 - 4.0h^{-1}$ Mpc and minimum dark matter halo masses of $10^{10.7 - 12.1}\rm{M}_\odot$ for our $z = 0.8 - 3.2$ H$\beta$+[OIII] emitters and $r_0 \sim 2.0 - 8.3h^{-1}$ Mpc and halo masses of $10^{11.5 - 12.6}\rm{M}_\odot$ for our $z = 1.5 - 4.7$ [OII] emitters. We find $r_0$ to strongly increase both with increasing line luminosity and redshift. By taking into account the evolution of the characteristic line luminosity, $L^\star(z)$, and using our model predictions of halo mass given $r_0$, we find a strong, redshift-independent increasing trend between $L/L^\star(z)$ and minimum halo mass. The faintest H$\beta$+[OIII] emitters are found to reside in $10^{9.5}\rm{M}_\odot$ halos and the brightest emitters in $10^{13.0}\rm{M}_\odot$ halos. For [OII] emitters, the faintest emitters are found in $10^{10.5} \rm{M}_\odot$ halos and the brightest emitters in $10^{12.6}\rm{M}_\odot$ halos. A redshift-independent stellar mass dependency is also observed where the halo mass increases from $10^{11}\rm{M}_\odot$ to $10^{12.5} \rm{M}_\odot$ for stellar masses of $10^{8.5}\rm{M}_\odot$ to $10^{11.5}\rm{M}_\odot$, respectively. We investigate the interdependencies of these trends by repeating our analysis in a $L_\textrm{line} - \rm{M}_\textrm{star}$ grid space for our most populated samples (H$\beta$+[OIII] $z = 0.84$ and [OII] $z = 1.47$) and find that the line luminosity dependency is stronger than the stellar mass dependency on halo mass. For $L > L^\star$ emitters at all epochs, we find a relatively flat trend with halo masses of $10^{12.5 - 13}\rm{M}_\odot$ which may be due to quenching mechanisms in massive halos which is consistent with a transitional halo mass predicted by models.
  • We present a 0.4-8$\mu$m multi-wavelength photometric catalog in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS) field. This catalog is built on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFC3 and ACS data from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS), and it incorporates the existing HST data from the All-wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey (AEGIS) and the 3D-HST program. The catalog is based on detections in the F160W band reaching a depth of F160W=26.62 AB (90% completeness, point-sources). It includes the photometry for 41457 objects over an area of $\approx 206$ arcmin$^2$ in the following bands: HST ACS F606W and F814W; HST WFC3 F125W, F140W and F160W; CFHT/Megacam $u^*$, $g'$, $r'$, $i'$ and $z'$; CFHT/WIRCAM $J$, $H$ and $K_\mathrm{S}$; Mayall/NEWFIRM $J1$, $J2$, $J3$, $H1$, $H2$, $K$; Spitzer IRAC $3.6\mu$m, $4.5\mu$m, $5.8\mu$m and $8.0\mu$m. We are also releasing value-added catalogs that provide robust photometric redshifts and stellar mass measurements. The catalogs are publicly available through the CANDELS repository.
  • We present results on the variation of 7.7 micron Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) emission in galaxies spanning a wide range in metallicity at z ~ 2. For this analysis, we use rest-frame optical spectra of 476 galaxies at 1.37 < z < 2.61 from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey to infer metallicities and ionization states. Spitzer/MIPS 24 micron and Herschel/PACS 100 and 160 micron observations are used to derive rest-frame 7.7 micron luminosities (L(7.7)) and total IR luminosities (L(IR)), respectively. We find significant trends between the ratio of L(7.7) to L(IR) (and to dust-corrected SFR) and both metallicity and [OIII]/[OII] (O32) emission-line ratio. The latter is an empirical proxy for the ionization parameter. These trends indicate a paucity of PAH emission in low metallicity environments with harder and more intense radiation fields. Additionally, L(7.7)/L(IR) is significantly lower in the youngest quartile of our sample (ages of 500 Myr) compared to older galaxies, which may be a result of the delayed production of PAHs by AGB stars. The relative strength of L(7.7) to L(IR) is also lower by a factor of ~ 2 for galaxies with masses $M_* < 10^{10}M_{\odot}$, compared to the more massive ones. We demonstrate that commonly-used conversions of L(7.7) (or 24 micron flux density; f(24)) to L(IR) underestimate the IR luminosity by more than a factor of 2 at $M_*$ ~ $10^{9.6-10.0} M_{\odot}$. We adopt a mass-dependent conversion of L(7.7) to L(IR) with L(7.7)/L(IR)= 0.09 and 0.22 for $M_* < 10^{10}$ and $> 10^{10} M_{\odot}$, respectively. Based on the new scaling, the SFR-$M_*$ relation has a shallower slope than previously derived. Our results also suggest a higher IR luminosity density at z ~ 2 than previously measured, corresponding to a ~ 30% increase in the SFR density.
  • Massive galaxies at higher redshifts ($\emph{z}$ $>$ 2) show different characteristics from their local counterparts: They are compact and most likely have a disk. In this study, we trace the evolution of local massive galaxies by performing a detailed morphological analysis, namely, fitting single S\'{e}rsic profiles and performing bulge+disk decompositions. We analyze $\sim$ 250 massive galaxies selected from all CANDELS fields (COSMOS, UDS, EGS, GOODS-South and GOODS-North). We confirm that both star-forming and quiescent galaxies increase their sizes significantly from $\emph{z}$ $\approx$ 2.5 to the present day. The global S\'{e}rsic index of quiescent galaxies increases over time (from $n$ $\approx$ 2.5 to $n$ $>$ 4), while that of star-forming galaxies remains roughly constant ($n$ $\approx$ 2.5). By decomposing galaxy profiles into bulge+disk components, we find that massive galaxies at high redshift have prominent stellar disks, which are also evident from visual inspection of the images. By $z$ $\approx$ 0.5, the majority of the disks disappear and massive quiescent galaxies begin to resemble the local elliptical galaxies. Star-forming galaxies have lower bulge-to-total ratios ($B/T$) than their quiescent counterparts at each redshift bin. The bulges of star-forming and quiescent galaxies follow different evolutionary histories, while their disks evolve similarly. We conclude that major mergers, along with minor mergers, have played a crucial role in the significant size increase of high-\emph{z} galaxies and the destruction of their massive and large-scale disks.
  • Unlike spiral galaxies such as the Milky Way, the majority of the stars in massive elliptical galaxies were formed in a short period early in the history of the Universe. The duration of this formation period can be measured using the ratio of magnesium to iron abundance ([Mg/Fe]), which reflects the relative enrichment by core-collapse and type Ia supernovae. For local galaxies, [Mg/Fe] probes the combined formation history of all stars currently in the galaxy, including younger and metal-poor stars that were added during late-time mergers. Therefore, to directly constrain the initial star-formation period, we must study galaxies at earlier epochs. The most distant galaxy for which [Mg/Fe] had previously been measured is at z~1.4, with [Mg/Fe]=0.45(+0.05,-0.19). A slightly earlier epoch (z~1.6) was probed by stacking the spectra of 24 massive quiescent galaxies, yielding an average [Mg/Fe] of 0.31+/-0.12. However, the relatively low S/N of the data and the use of index analysis techniques for both studies resulted in measurement errors that are too large to allow us to form strong conclusions. Deeper spectra at even earlier epochs in combination with analysis techniques based on full spectral fitting are required to precisely measure the abundance pattern shortly after the major star-forming phase (z>2). Here we report a measurement of [Mg/Fe] for a massive quiescent galaxy at z=2.1. With [Mg/Fe]=0.59+/-0.11, this galaxy is the most Mg-enhanced massive galaxy found so far, having twice the Mg enhancement of similar-mass galaxies today. The abundance pattern of the galaxy is consistent with enrichment exclusively by core-collapse supernovae and with a star-formation timescale of 0.1-0.5 Gyr - characteristics that are similar to population II stars in the Milky Way. With an average past SFR of 600-3000 Msol/yr, this galaxy was among the most vigorous star-forming galaxies in the Universe.
  • We present results from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey on the identification, selection biases, and host galaxy properties of 55 X-ray, IR and optically-selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) at $1.4 < z < 3.8$. We obtain rest-frame optical spectra of galaxies and AGN and use the BPT diagram to identify optical AGN. We examine the uniqueness and overlap of the AGN identified at different wavelengths. There is a strong bias against identifying AGN at any wavelength in low mass galaxies, and an additional bias against identifying IR AGN in the most massive galaxies. AGN hosts span a wide range of star formation rate (SFR), similar to inactive galaxies once stellar mass selection effects are accounted for. However, we find (at $\sim 2-3\sigma$ significance) that IR AGN are in less dusty galaxies with relatively higher SFR and optical AGN in dusty galaxies with relatively lower SFR. X-ray AGN selection does not display a bias with host galaxy SFR. These results are consistent with those from larger studies at lower redshifts. Within star-forming galaxies, once selection biases are accounted for, we find AGN in galaxies with similar physical properties as inactive galaxies, with no evidence for AGN activity in particular types of galaxies. This is consistent with AGN being fueled stochastically in any star-forming host galaxy. We do not detect a significant correlation between SFR and AGN luminosity for individual AGN hosts, which may indicate the timescale difference between the growth of galaxies and their supermassive black holes.
  • We use a mass complete (log($M/M_{\odot}$) $\geqslant$ 9.6) sample of galaxies with accurate photometric redshifts in the COSMOS field to construct the density field and the cosmic web to $z$=1.2. The comic web extraction relies on the density field Hessian matrix and breaks the density field into clusters, filaments and the field. We provide the density field and cosmic web measures to the community. We show that at $z$ $\lesssim$ 0.8, the median star-formation rate (SFR) in the cosmic web gradually declines from the field to clusters and this decline is especially sharp for satellites ($\sim$ 1 dex vs. $\sim$ 0.5 dex for centrals). However, at $z$ $\gtrsim$ 0.8, the trend flattens out for the overall galaxy population and satellites. For star-forming galaxies only, the median SFR is constant at $z$ $\gtrsim$ 0.5 but declines by $\sim$ 0.3-0.4 dex from the field to clusters for satellites and centrals at $z$ $\lesssim$ 0.5. We argue that for satellites, the main role of the cosmic web environment is to control their star-forming fraction, whereas for centrals, it is mainly to control their overall SFR at $z$ $\lesssim$ 0.5 and to set their fraction at $z$ $\gtrsim$ 0.5. We suggest that most satellites experience a rapid quenching mechanism as they fall from the field into clusters through filaments, whereas centrals mostly undergo a slow environmental quenching at $z$ $\lesssim$ 0.5 and a fast mechanism at higher redshifts. Our preliminary results highlight the importance of the large-scale cosmic web on galaxy evolution.
  • We present quantified visual morphologies of approximately 48,000 galaxies observed in three Hubble Space Telescope legacy fields by the Cosmic And Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and classified by participants in the Galaxy Zoo project. 90% of galaxies have z < 3 and are observed in rest-frame optical wavelengths by CANDELS. Each galaxy received an average of 40 independent classifications, which we combine into detailed morphological information on galaxy features such as clumpiness, bar instabilities, spiral structure, and merger and tidal signatures. We apply a consensus-based classifier weighting method that preserves classifier independence while effectively down-weighting significantly outlying classifications. After analysing the effect of varying image depth on reported classifications, we also provide depth-corrected classifications which both preserve the information in the deepest observations and also enable the use of classifications at comparable depths across the full survey. Comparing the Galaxy Zoo classifications to previous classifications of the same galaxies shows very good agreement; for some applications the high number of independent classifications provided by Galaxy Zoo provides an advantage in selecting galaxies with a particular morphological profile, while in others the combination of Galaxy Zoo with other classifications is a more promising approach than using any one method alone. We combine the Galaxy Zoo classifications of "smooth" galaxies with parametric morphologies to select a sample of featureless disks at 1 < z < 3, which may represent a dynamically warmer progenitor population to the settled disk galaxies seen at later epochs.
  • We present measurements of the electron-temperature based oxygen abundance for a highly star-forming galaxy at z=3.08, COSMOS-1908. This is the highest redshift at which [OIII]$\lambda$4363 has been detected, and the first time that this line has been measured at z>2. We estimate an oxygen abundance of 12+log(O/H)$=8.00^{+0.13}_{-0.14}$. This galaxy is a low-mass ($10^{9.3}$ M$_{\odot}$), highly star-forming ($\sim50$ M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$) system that hosts a young stellar population ($\sim160$ Myr). We investigate the physical conditions of the ionized gas in COSMOS-1908 and find that this galaxy has a high ionization parameter, little nebular reddening ($E(B-V)_{\rm gas}<0.14$), and a high electron density ($n_e\sim500$ cm$^{-3}$). We compare the ratios of strong oxygen, neon, and hydrogen lines to the direct-method oxygen abundance for COSMOS-1908 and additional star-forming galaxies at z=0-1.8 with [OIII]$\lambda$4363 measurements, and show that galaxies at z$\sim$1-3 follow the same strong-line correlations as galaxies in the local universe. This agreement suggests that the relationship between ionization parameter and O/H is similar for z$\sim$0 and high-redshift galaxies. These results imply that metallicity calibrations based on lines of oxygen, neon, and hydrogen do not strongly evolve with redshift and can reliably estimate abundances out to z$\sim$3, paving the way for robust measurements of the evolution of the mass-metallicity relation to high redshift.
  • We study the effects of local environment and stellar mass on galaxy properties using a mass complete sample of quiescent and star-forming systems in the COSMOS field at $z\lesssim$ 3. We show that at $z\lesssim$ 1, the median star-formation rate (SFR) and specific SFR (sSFR) of all galaxies depend on environment, but they become independent of environment at $z\gtrsim$ 1. However, we find that only for \textit{star-forming} galaxies, the median SFR and sSFR are similar in different environments, regardless of redshift and stellar mass. We find that the quiescent fraction depends on environment at $z\lesssim$ 1, and on stellar mass out to $z\sim$ 3. We show that at $z\lesssim$ 1, galaxies become quiescent faster in denser environments and that the overall environmental quenching efficiency increases with cosmic time. Environmental and mass quenching processes depend on each other. At $z\lesssim$ 1, denser environments more efficiently quench galaxies with higher masses (log($M/M_{\odot}$)$\gtrsim$ 10.7), possibly due to a higher merger rate of massive galaxies in denser environments, and that mass quenching is more efficient in denser regions. We show that the overall mass quenching efficiency ($\epsilon_{mass}$) for more massive galaxies (log($M/M_{\odot}$)$\gtrsim$ 10.2) rises with cosmic time until $z\sim$ 1 and flattens out since then. However, for less massive galaxies, the rise in $\epsilon_{mass}$ continues to the present time. Our results suggest that environmental quenching is only relevant at $z\lesssim$ 1, likely a fast process, whereas mass quenching is the dominant mechanism at $z\gtrsim$ 1, with a possible stellar feedback physics.
  • We investigate the properties of $\sim7000$ narrow-band selected galaxies with strong H$\beta+$[OIII] and [OII] nebular emission lines from the High-$z$ Emission Line Survey (HiZELS) between $z \sim 0.8 - 5.0$. Our sample covers a wide range in stellar mass ($M\sim10^{7.5 - 12.0}$ M$_\odot$), rest-frame equivalent widths (EW$_\mathrm{rest}\sim 10 - 10^5$ \AA), and line luminosities ($L\sim10^{40.5 - 43.2}$ erg s$^{-1}$). We measure the H$\beta+$[OIII] and [OII]-selected stellar mass functions out to $z \sim 3.5$ and find that both $M_\star$ and $\phi_\star$ increases with cosmic time, which may be due to the [OIII] selection including an increasing fraction of AGN at lower redshifts. The [OII]-selected stellar mass functions show a constant $M_\star\sim10^{11.6}$ M$_\odot$ and a strong, increasing evolution with cosmic time in $\phi_\star$ in line with H$\alpha$ studies. We also investigate the EW$_\mathrm{rest}$ evolution as a function of redshift with a fixed mass range (10$^{9.5 - 10.0}$ M$_\odot$) and find an increasing trend best represented by $(1+z)^{3.81\pm0.14}$ and $(1+z)^{2.72\pm0.19}$ up to $z\sim 2$ and $\sim 3$ for H$\beta$+[OIII] and [OII] emitters, respectively. This is the first time that the EW evolution has been directly measured for H$\beta+$[OIII] and [OII] emitters up to these redshifts. There is evidence for a slower evolution for $z > 2$ in the H$\beta+$[OIII] EW and a decreasing trend for $z > 3$ in the [OII] EW evolution, which would imply low [OII] EW at the highest redshifts and higher [OIII]/[OII] line ratios. This suggests that the ionization parameter at higher redshift may be significantly higher than the local Universe. Our results set the stage for future near-IR space-based spectroscopic surveys to test our extrapolated predictions and also produce $z > 5$ measurements to constrain the high-$z$ end of the EW$_\mathrm{rest}$ and [OIII]/[OII] evolution.
  • We present the first direct comparison between Balmer line and panchromatic SED-based SFRs for z~2 galaxies. For this comparison we used 17 star-forming galaxies selected from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey, with $3\sigma$ detections for H$\alpha$ and at least two IR bands (Spitzer/MIPS 24$\mu$m and Herschel/PACS 100 and 160$\mu$m, and in some cases Herschel/SPIRE 250, 350, and 500$\mu$m). The galaxies have total IR (8-1000$\mu$m) luminosities of $\sim10^{11.4}-10^{12.4}\,\textrm{L}_\odot$ and star-formation rates (SFRs) of $\sim30-250\,\textrm{M}_\odot\,\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$. We fit the UV-to-far-IR SEDs with flexible stellar population synthesis (FSPS) models - which include both stellar and dust emission - and compare the inferred SFRs with the SFR(H$\alpha$,H$\beta$) values corrected for dust attenuation using Balmer decrements. The two SFRs agree with a scatter of 0.17 dex. Our results imply that the Balmer decrement accurately predicts the obscuration of the nebular lines and can be used to robustly calculate SFRs for star-forming galaxies at z~2 with SFRs up to $\sim200\,\textrm{M}_\odot\,\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$. We also use our data to assess SFR indicators based on modeling the UV-to-mid-IR SEDs or by adding SFR(UV) and SFR(IR), for which the latter is based on the mid-IR only or on the full IR SED. All these SFRs show a poorer agreement with SFR(H$\alpha$,H$\beta$) and in some cases large systematic biases are observed. Finally, we show that the SFR and dust attenuation derived from the UV-to-near-IR SED alone are unbiased when assuming a delayed exponentially declining star-formation history.
  • We present estimates of intrinsic scatter in the Star Formation Rate (SFR) - Stellar Mass (M*) correlation in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 3.0 and in the mass range 10^7 < M* < 10^11 Msun. We utilize photometry in the Hubble Ultradeep Field (HUDF12), Ultraviolet Ultra Deep Field (UVUDF) campaigns and CANDELS/GOODS-S. We estimate SFR, M* from broadband Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) and the best available redshifts. The maximum depth of the HUDF photometry (F160W 29.9 AB, 5 sigma depth) probes the SFR-M* correlation down to M* ~ 10 ^7 Msun, a factor of 10-100X lower in M* than previous studies, and comparable to dwarf galaxies in the local universe. We find the slope of the SFR-M* relationship to be near unity at all redshifts and the normalization to decrease with cosmic time. We find a moderate increase in intrinsic scatter with cosmic time from 0.2 to 0.4 dex across the epoch of peak cosmic star formation. None of our redshift bins show a statistically significant increase in intrinsic scatter at low mass. However, it remains possible that intrinsic scatter increases at low mass on timescales shorter than ~ 100 Myr. Our results are consistent with a picture of gradual and self-similar assembly of galaxies across more than three orders of magnitude in stellar mass from as low as 10^7 Msun.