• In a Dirac nodal line semimetal, the bulk conduction and valence bands touch at extended lines in the Brillouin zone. To date, most of the theoretically predicted and experimentally discovered nodal lines derive from the bulk bands of two- and three-dimensional materials. Here, based on combined angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements and first-principles calculations, we report the discovery of node-line-like surface states on the (001) surface of LaBi. These bands derive from the topological surface states of LaBi and bridge the band gap opened by spin-orbit coupling and band inversion. Our first-principles calculations reveal that these "nodal lines" have a tiny gap, which is beyond typical experimental resolution. These results may provide important information to understand the extraordinary physical properties of LaBi, such as the extremely large magnetoresistance and resistivity plateau.
  • Engineering atomic-scale structures allows great manipulation of physical properties and chemical processes for advanced technology. We show that the B atoms deployed at the centers of honeycombs in boron sheets, borophene, behave as nearly perfect electron donors for filling the graphitic $\sigma$ bonding states without forming additional in-plane bonds by first-principles calculations. The dilute electron density distribution owing to the weak bonding surrounding the center atoms provides easier atomic-scale engineering and is highly tunable via in-plane strain, promising for practical applications, such as modulating the extraordinarily high thermal conductance that exceeds the reported value in graphene. The hidden honeycomb bonding structure suggests an unusual energy sequence of core electrons that has been verified by our high-resolution core-level photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. With the experimental and theoretical evidence, we demonstrate that borophene exhibits a peculiar bonding structure and is distinctive among two-dimensional materials.
  • Topological nodal line semimetals, a novel quantum state of materials, possess topologically nontrivial valence and conduction bands that touch at a line near the Fermi level. The exotic band structure can lead to various novel properties, such as long-range Coulomb interaction and flat Landau levels. Recently, topological nodal lines have been observed in several bulk materials, such as PtSn4, ZrSiS, TlTaSe2 and PbTaSe2. However, in two-dimensional materials, experimental research on nodal line fermions is still lacking. Here, we report the discovery of two-dimensional Dirac nodal line fermions in monolayer Cu2Si based on combined theoretical calculations and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements. The Dirac nodal lines in Cu2Si form two concentric loops centred around the {\Gamma} point and are protected by mirror reflection symmetry. Our results establish Cu2Si as a new platform to study the novel physical properties in two-dimensional Dirac materials and provide new opportunities to realize high-speed low-dissipation devices.
  • Honeycomb structures of group IV elements can host massless Dirac fermions with non-trivial Berry phases. Their potential for electronic applications has attracted great interest and spurred a broad search for new Dirac materials especially in monolayer structures. We present a detailed investigation of the \beta 12 boron sheet, which is a borophene structure that can form spontaneously on a Ag(111) surface. Our tight-binding analysis revealed that the lattice of the \beta 12-sheet could be decomposed into two triangular sublattices in a way similar to that for a honeycomb lattice, thereby hosting Dirac cones. Furthermore, each Dirac cone could be split by introducing periodic perturbations representing overlayer-substrate interactions. These unusual electronic structures were confirmed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and validated by first-principles calculations. Our results suggest monolayer boron as a new platform for realizing novel high-speed low-dissipation devices.
  • We determine the band structure and spin texture of WTe2 by spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SARPES). With the support of first-principles calculations, we reveal the existence of spin polarization of both the Fermi arc surface states and bulk Fermi pockets. Our results support WTe2 to be a type-II Weyl semimetal candidate and provide important information to understand its extremely large and nonsaturating magnetoresistance.
  • The search for metallic boron allotropes has attracted great attention in the past decades and recent theoretical works predict the existence of metallicity in monolayer boron. Here, we synthesize the \b{eta}12-sheet monolayer boron on a Ag(111) surface and confirm the presence of metallic boron-derived bands using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The Fermi surface is composed of one electron pocket at the S point and a pair of hole pockets near the X point, which is supported by the first-principles calculations. The metallic boron allotrope in \b{eta}12 sheet opens the way to novel physics and chemistry in material science.
  • Boron is the fifth element in the periodic table and possesses rich chemistry second only to carbon. A striking feature of boron is that B12 icosahedral cages occur as the building blocks in bulk boron and many boron compounds. This is in contrast to its neighboring element, carbon, which prefers 2D layered structure (graphite) in its bulk form. On the other hand, boron clusters of medium size have been predicted to be planar or quasi-planar, such as B12+ , B13+, B19-, B36, and so on. This is also in contrast to carbon clusters which exhibit various cage structures (fullerenes). Therefore, boron and carbon can be viewed as a set of complementary chemical systems in their bulk and cluster structures. Now, with the boom of graphene, an intriguing question is that whether boron can also form a monoatomic-layer 2D sheet structure? Here, we report the first successful experimental realization of 2D boron sheets. We have revealed two types of boron sheet structures, corresponding to a triangular boron lattice with different arrangements of the hexagonal holes. Moreover, our boron sheets were found to be relatively stable against oxidization, and interacts only weekly with the substrate. The realization of such a long expected 2D boron sheet could open a door toward boron electronics, in analogous to the carbon electronics based on graphene.
  • We have performed scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) study and first-principles calculations to investigate the atomic structure and electronic properties of silicon nanoribbons (SiNRs) grown on Ag(110). Despite of the extensive research on SiNRs in the last decades, its atomic structure is still not fully understood so far. In this report we determine that the structure of SiNRs/Ag(110) is armchair silicene nanoribbon with reconstructed edges. Meanwhile, pronounced quantum well states (QWS) in SiNRs were observed and their energy spectrum was systematically measured. The QWS are due to the confinement of quasiparticles perpendicular to the nanoribbon and can be well explained by the theory of one-dimensional (1D) 'particle-in-a-box' model in quantum mechanics.
  • Silicene, analogous to graphene, is a one-atom-thick two-dimensional crystal of silicon which is expected to share many of the remarkable properties of graphene. The buckled honeycomb structure of silicene, along with its enhanced spin-orbit coupling, endows silicene with considerable advantages over graphene in that the spin-split states in silicene are tunable with external fields. Although the low-energy Dirac cone states lie at the heart of all novel quantum phenomena in a pristine sheet of silicene, the question of whether or not these key states can survive when silicene is grown or supported on a substrate remains hotly debated. Here we report our direct observation of Dirac cones in monolayer silicene grown on a Ag(111) substrate. By performing angle-resolved photoemission measurements on silicene(3x3)/Ag(111), we reveal the presence of six pairs of Dirac cones on the edges of the first Brillouin zone of Ag(111), other than expected six Dirac cones at the K points of the primary silicene(1x1) Brillouin zone. Our result shows clearly that the unusual Dirac cone structure originates not from the pristine silicene alone but from the combined effect of silicene(3x3) and the Ag(111) substrate. This study identifies the first case of a new type of Dirac Fermion generated through the interaction of two different constituents. Our observation of Dirac cones in silicene/Ag(111) opens a new materials platform for investigating unusual quantum phenomena and novel applications based on two-dimensional silicon systems.
  • We performed a scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) study on the electronic structures of of root(3)Xroot(3)-silicene on Ag(111). We find that the coupling strength of root(3)Xroot(3)-silicene with Ag(111) substrate is variable at different regions, giving rise to notable effects in experiments. These evidences of decoupling or variable interaction of silicene with the substrate are helpful to in-depth understanding of the structure and electronic properties of silicene.
  • The "multilayer silicene" films were grown on Ag(111), with increasing thickness above 30 monolayers (ML). We found that the "multilayer silicene" is indeed a bulk Si(111) film. Such Si film on Ag(111) always exhibits a root(3)xroot(3) honeycomb superstructure on surface. Delocalized surface state as well as linear energy-momentum dispersion was revealed by quasiparticle interference patterns (QPI) on the surface, which proves the existence of Dirac fermions state. Our results indicate that bulk silicon with diamond structure can also host Dirac fermions, which makes the system even more attractive for further applications compared with monolayer silicene.
  • We performed low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) studies on the electronic properties of (R3xR3)R30{\deg} phase of silicene on Ag(111) surface. We found the existence of Dirac Fermion chirality through the observation of -1.5 and -1.0 power law decay of quasiparticle interference (QPI) patterns. Moreover, in contrast to the trigonal warping of Dirac cone in graphene, we found that the Dirac cone of silicene is hexagonally warped, which is further confirmed by density functional calculations and explained by the unique superstructure of silicene. Our results demonstrate that the (R3xR3)R30{\deg} phase is an ideal system to investigate the unique Dirac Fermion properties of silicene.
  • A possible superconducting gap, about 35 meV, was observed in silicene on Ag(111) substrate by scanning tunneling spectroscopy. The temperature-dependence measurement reveals a superconductor-metal transition and gives a critical temperature of about 35-40K. The possible mechanism of superconductivity in silicene is discussed.
  • The (r3xr3)R30{\deg} honeycomb of silicene monolayer on Ag(111) was found to undergo a phase transition to two types of mirror-symmetric boundary-separated rhombic phases at temperatures below 40 K by scanning tunneling microscopy. The first-principles calculations reveal that weak interactions between silicene and Ag(111) drive the spontaneous ultra buckling in the monolayer silicene, forming two energy-degenerate and mirror-symmetric (r3xr3)R30{\deg} rhombic phases, in which the linear band dispersion near Dirac point (DP) and a significant gap opening (150 meV) at DP were induced. The low transition barrier between these two phases enables them interchangeable through dynamic flip-flop motion, resulting in the (r3xr3)R30{\deg} honeycomb structure observed at high temperature.
  • Silicene, a sheet of silicon atoms in a honeycomb lattice, was proposed to be a new Dirac-type electron system similar as graphene. We performed scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy studies on the atomic and electronic properties of silicene on Ag(111). An unexpected $\sqrt{3}\times \sqrt{3}$ reconstruction was found, which is explained by an extra-buckling model. Pronounced quasi-particle interferences (QPI) patterns, originating from both the intervalley and intravalley scattering, were observed. From the QPI patterns we derived a linear energy-momentum dispersion and a large Fermi velocity, which prove the existence of Dirac Fermions in silicene.
  • In the search for evidence of silicene, a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice of silicon, it is important to obtain a complete picture for the evolution of Si structures on Ag(111), which is believed to be the most suitable substrate for growth of silicene so far. In this work we report the finding and evolution of several monolayer superstructures of silicon on Ag(111) depending on the coverage and temperature. Combined with first-principles calculations, the detailed structures of these phases have been illuminated. These structure were found to share common building blocks of silicon rings, and they evolve from a fragment of silicene to a complete monolayer silicene and multilayer silicene. Our results elucidate how silicene formes on Ag(111) surface and provide methods to synthesize high-quality and large-scale silicene.