• The concept of resilience can be realized in daily traffic, representing the ability of transportation system to adapt and recover from traffic jams. Although resilience is a critical property needed for understanding and managing the organization balance in traffic networks, a systematic study of resilience as well as its accepted definition in real urban traffic is still missing. Here we define a city traffic resilience as the size of the spatio-temporal clusters of congestion in real traffic, and find that the resilience follows a scale free distribution in both, city road networks and in highways, with different exponents, but similar exponents in different days and cities. The traffic resilience is also revealed to have a novel scaling relation between the cluster size of the spatio-temporal jam and its recovery duration, independent of microscopic details. Our findings provide insight towards universal properties of traffic resilience for better forecasting and mitigation of congestions.
  • Altmetrics, indices based on social media platforms and tools, have recently emerged as alternative means of measuring scholarly impact. Such indices assume that scholars in fact populate online social environments, and interact with scholarly products there. We tested this assumption by examining the use and coverage of social media environments amongst a sample of bibliometricians. As expected, coverage varied: 82% of articles published by sampled bibliometricians were included in Mendeley libraries, while only 28% were included in CiteULike. Mendeley bookmarking was moderately correlated (.45) with Scopus citation. Over half of respondents asserted that social media tools were affecting their professional lives, although uptake of online tools varied widely. 68% of those surveyed had LinkedIn accounts, while Academia.edu, Mendeley, and ResearchGate each claimed a fifth of respondents. Nearly half of those responding had Twitter accounts, which they used both personally and professionally. Surveyed bibliometricians had mixed opinions on altmetrics' potential; 72% valued download counts, while a third saw potential in tracking articles' influence in blogs, Wikipedia, reference managers, and social media. Altogether, these findings suggest that some online tools are seeing substantial use by bibliometricians, and that they present a potentially valuable source of impact data.
  • Traditionally, scholarly impact and visibility have been measured by counting publications and citations in the scholarly literature. However, increasingly scholars are also visible on the Web, establishing presences in a growing variety of social ecosystems. But how wide and established is this presence, and how do measures of social Web impact relate to their more traditional counterparts? To answer this, we sampled 57 presenters from the 2010 Leiden STI Conference, gathering publication and citations counts as well as data from the presenters' Web "footprints." We found Web presence widespread and diverse: 84% of scholars had homepages, 70% were on LinkedIn, 23% had public Google Scholar profiles, and 16% were on Twitter. For sampled scholars' publications, social reference manager bookmarks were compared to Scopus and Web of Science citations; we found that Mendeley covers more than 80% of sampled articles, and that Mendeley bookmarks are significantly correlated (r=.45) to Scopus citation counts.
  • Utilization of current pyroelectric accelerators (PEA) is limited due to low ion current and neutron generation yields. Current design, using pyroelectrics (PE) with high pyrocoefficient (p), having high dielectric constant (e), limits the figure-of-merit. We present detailed analysis of a modified structure of PEA, providing the highest attainable voltage and ion current. In the paired configuration, using metal plates covering the polar faces, with grounded back plates, the accelerating voltage and electric field are proportional to p and do not depend on e. Therefore, in the modified structure, PE with high p significantly increases the ion and neutron yields.
  • We describe here the first comprehensive investigation of a pyroelectric response of a p-n junction in a non-polar paraelectric semiconductor. The pyroelectric effect is generated by the, temperature dependent, built-in electrical dipole moment. High quality PbTe p-n junctions have been prepared specifically for this experiment. The pyroelectric effect was excited by a continuous CO2 laser beam, modulated by a mechanical chopper. The shape and amplitude of the periodic and single-pulse pyroelectric signals were studied as a function of temperature (10K-130K), reverse bias voltage (up to -500 mV) and chopping frequency (4Hz-2000Hz). The pyroelectric coefficient is about 10^(-3) microC/cm2K in the temperature region 40 - 80 K. The developed theoretical model quantitatively describes all the experimental features of the observed pyroelectric effect. The time evolution of the temperature within the p-n junction was reconstructed.
  • We describe here the first comprehensive investigation of a pyroelectric response of a p-n junction in a non-polar paraelectric semiconductor. The pyroelectric effect is generated by the, temperature dependent, built-in electrical dipole moment. High quality PbTe p-n junctions have been prepared specifically for this experiment. The pyroelectric effect was excited by a continuous CO2 laser beam, modulated by a mechanical chopper. The shape and amplitude of the periodic and single-pulse pyroelectric signals were studied as a function of temperature (10K-130K), reverse bias voltage (up to -500 mV) and chopping frequency (4Hz-2000Hz). The pyroelectric coefficient is about 10^(-3) microC/cm2K in the temperature region 40 - 80 K. The developed theoretical model quantitatively describes all the experimental features of the observed pyroelectric effect. The time evolution of the temperature within the p-n junction was reconstructed.
  • Many attempts to explain the Boson peak in the vibrational spectra of glasses consider models of a lattice of harmonic oscillators connected by spring constants of varying strength and randomly distributed. However, in real glasses one expects that some molecules will be connected to their neighbors by more than one weak bond, so that a realistic model should consider oscillators with several weak springs. In this paper, a t-matrix formalism is used to study the effect of such correlated weak springs in a scalar model on a simple cubic lattice with a binary distribution of spring constants. Our results, which are confirmed by computer simulations, show that a concentration of c oscillators with z weak springs and 6-z strong ones leads to a low frequency peak in the reduced density of states (Boson peak) even when the total concentration of weak springs cz is less than 10%., No such peak has been found at these low concentrations in previously reported calculations which used effective medium methods. For a given value of cz, this peak becomes more pronounced and moves to much lower frequencies as z increases.
  • Problems involving disordered systems are usually analyzed for systems with random disorder. However, there are many systems in which the main disorder involves clusters with correlated differences between their properties and those of the average system. A new approximation, the average trace approximation, is proposed for calculating the diagonal elements of the Green function, and hence the density of states, in such systems. As an example, application of the method to a simple cubic array of harmonic oscillators shows that correlation in the disorder leads to a peak in the low frequency density of states, a result confirmed by computer simulations.
  • A structure called a decision making problem is considered. The set of outcomes (consequences) is partially ordered according to the decision maker's preferences. The problem is how these preferences affect a decision maker to prefer one of his strategies (or acts) to another, i.e. it is to describe so called derived preference relations. This problem is formalized by using category theory approach and reduced to a pure algebraical question. An effective method is suggested to build all reasonable derived preferences relations and to compare them with each other.
  • Given a variety of universal algebras. A method is suggested for describing automorphisms of a category of free algebras of this variety. Applying this general method all automorphisms of such categories are found in two cases: 1) for the variety of all free associative K-algebras over an infinite field K and 2) for the variety of all representations of groups in unital R-modules over a commutative associative ring R with unit. It turns out that they are almost inner in a sense.
  • A new approach is suggested to characterize algebraically automorphisms of the category of free algebras of a given variety. It gives in many cases an answer to the problem set by the first of authors, if automorphisms of such a category are inner or not. This question is important for universal algebraic geometry [arXiv:math. GM\slash 0210187],[arXiv:math. GM\slash 0210194]. Most of results are actually valid for arbitrary categories with a represented forgetful functor.
  • X-ray reflectivity measurements of the binary liquid Ga-Bi alloy reveal a dramatically different surface structure above and below the monotectic temperature $T_{mono}=222^{\circ}$ C. A Gibbs-adsorbed Bi monolayer resides at the surface at both regimes. However, a 30 {\AA} thick, Bi-rich wetting film intrudes between the Bi monolayer and the Ga-rich bulk for $T > T_{mono}$. The internal structure of the wetting film is determined with {\AA} resolution, showing a theoretically unexpected concentration gradient and a highly diffuse interface with the bulk phase.
  • We present an x-ray reflectivity study of wetting at the free surface of the binary liquid metal gallium-bismuth (Ga-Bi) in the region where the bulk phase separates into Bi-rich and Ga-rich liquid phases. The measurements reveal the evolution of the microscopic structure of wetting films of the Bi-rich, low-surface-tension phase along different paths in the bulk phase diagram. A balance between the surface potential preferring the Bi-rich phase and the gravitational potential which favors the Ga-rich phase at the surface pins the interface of the two demixed liquid metallic phases close to the free surface. This enables us to resolve it on an Angstrom level and to apply a mean-field, square gradient model extended by thermally activated capillary waves as dominant thermal fluctuations. The sole free parameter of the gradient model, i.e. the so-called influence parameter, $\kappa$, is determined from our measurements. Relying on a calculation of the liquid/liquid interfacial tension that makes it possible to distinguish between intrinsic and capillary wave contributions to the interfacial structure we estimate that fluctuations affect the observed short-range, complete wetting phenomena only marginally. A critical wetting transition that should be sensitive to thermal fluctuations seems to be absent in this binary metallic alloy.
  • Recent measurements show that the free surfaces of liquid metals and alloys are always layered, regardless of composition and surface tension; a result supported by three decades of simulations and theory. Recent theoretical work claims, however, that at low enough temperatures the free surfaces of all liquids should become layered, unless preempted by bulk freezing. Using x-ray reflectivity and diffuse scattering measurements we show that there is no observable surface-induced layering in water at T=298 K, thus highlighting a fundamental difference between dielectric and metallic liquids. The implications of this result for the question in the title are discussed.
  • We report x-ray reflectivity (XR) and small angle off-specular diffuse scattering (DS) measurements from the surface of liquid Indium close to its melting point of $156^\circ$C. From the XR measurements we extract the surface structure factor convolved with fluctuations in the height of the liquid surface. We present a model to describe DS that takes into account the surface structure factor, thermally excited capillary waves and the experimental resolution. The experimentally determined DS follows this model with no adjustable parameters, allowing the surface structure factor to be deconvolved from the thermally excited height fluctuations. The resulting local electron density profile displays exponentially decaying surface induced layering similar to that previously reported for Ga and Hg. We compare the details of the local electron density profiles of liquid In, which is a nearly free electron metal, and liquid Ga, which is considerably more covalent and shows directional bonding in the melt. The oscillatory density profiles have comparable amplitudes in both metals, but surface layering decays over a length scale of $3.5\pm 0.6$ \AA for In and $5.5\pm 0.4$ \AA for Ga. Upon controlled exposure to oxygen, no oxide monolayer is formed on the liquid In surface, unlike the passivating film formed on liquid Gallium.
  • The magnetization M of a thin YBaCuO film is measured as a function of the angle $\theta $ between the applied field H and the c-axis. For fields above the first critical field, but below the Bean's field for first penetration H*, M is symmetric with respect to $\theta =\pi $ and the magnetization curves for forward and backward rotation coincide. For H>H* the curves are asymmetric and they do not coincide. These phenomena have a simple explanation in the framework of the Bean critical state model.