• Bayesian sparse factor models have proven useful for characterizing dependence in multivariate data, but scaling computation to large numbers of samples and dimensions is problematic. We propose expandable factor analysis for scalable inference in factor models when the number of factors is unknown. The method relies on a continuous shrinkage prior for efficient maximum a posteriori estimation of a low-rank and sparse loadings matrix. The structure of the prior leads to an estimation algorithm that accommodates uncertainty in the number of factors. We propose an information criterion to select the hyperparameters of the prior. Expandable factor analysis has better false discovery rates and true positive rates than its competitors across diverse simulations. We apply the proposed approach to a gene expression study of aging in mice, illustrating superior results relative to four competing methods.
  • Domain adaptation addresses the problem created when training data is generated by a so-called source distribution, but test data is generated by a significantly different target distribution. In this work, we present approximate label matching (ALM), a new unsupervised domain adaptation technique that creates and leverages a rough labeling on the test samples, then uses these noisy labels to learn a transformation that aligns the source and target samples. We show that the transformation estimated by ALM has favorable properties compared to transformations estimated by other methods, which do not use any kind of target labeling. Our model is regularized by requiring that a classifier trained to discriminate source from transformed target samples cannot distinguish between the two. We experiment with ALM on simulated and real data, and show that it outperforms techniques commonly used in the field.
  • We present a general framework, the coupled compound Poisson factorization (CCPF), to capture the missing-data mechanism in extremely sparse data sets by coupling a hierarchical Poisson factorization with an arbitrary data-generating model. We derive a stochastic variational inference algorithm for the resulting model and, as examples of our framework, implement three different data-generating models---a mixture model, linear regression, and factor analysis---to robustly model non-random missing data in the context of clustering, prediction, and matrix factorization. In all three cases, we test our framework against models that ignore the missing-data mechanism on large scale studies with non-random missing data, and we show that explicitly modeling the missing-data mechanism substantially improves the quality of the results, as measured using data log likelihood on a held-out test set.
  • Model-based collaborative filtering analyzes user-item interactions to infer latent factors that represent user preferences and item characteristics in order to predict future interactions. Most collaborative filtering algorithms assume that these latent factors are static, although it has been shown that user preferences and item perceptions drift over time. In this paper, we propose a conjugate and numerically stable dynamic matrix factorization (DCPF) based on compound Poisson matrix factorization that models the smoothly drifting latent factors using Gamma-Markov chains. We propose a numerically stable Gamma chain construction, and then present a stochastic variational inference approach to estimate the parameters of our model. We apply our model to time-stamped ratings data sets: Netflix, Yelp, and Last.fm, where DCPF achieves a higher predictive accuracy than state-of-the-art static and dynamic factorization models.
  • Non-negative matrix factorization models based on a hierarchical Gamma-Poisson structure capture user and item behavior effectively in extremely sparse data sets, making them the ideal choice for collaborative filtering applications. Hierarchical Poisson factorization (HPF) in particular has proved successful for scalable recommendation systems with extreme sparsity. HPF, however, suffers from a tight coupling of sparsity model (absence of a rating) and response model (the value of the rating), which limits the expressiveness of the latter. Here, we introduce hierarchical compound Poisson factorization (HCPF) that has the favorable Gamma-Poisson structure and scalability of HPF to high-dimensional extremely sparse matrices. More importantly, HCPF decouples the sparsity model from the response model, allowing us to choose the most suitable distribution for the response. HCPF can capture binary, non-negative discrete, non-negative continuous, and zero-inflated continuous responses. We compare HCPF with HPF on nine discrete and three continuous data sets and conclude that HCPF captures the relationship between sparsity and response better than HPF.
  • We develop a generalized method of moments (GMM) approach for fast parameter estimation in a new class of Dirichlet latent variable models with mixed data types. Parameter estimation via GMM has been demonstrated to have computational and statistical advantages over alternative methods, such as expectation maximization, variational inference, and Markov chain Monte Carlo. The key computational advan- tage of our method (MELD) is that parameter estimation does not require instantiation of the latent variables. Moreover, a representational advantage of the GMM approach is that the behavior of the model is agnostic to distributional assumptions of the observations. We derive population moment conditions after marginalizing out the sample-specific Dirichlet latent variables. The moment conditions only depend on component mean parameters. We illustrate the utility of our approach on simulated data, comparing results from MELD to alternative methods, and we show the promise of our approach through the application of MELD to several data sets.
  • Identifying latent structure in large data matrices is essential for exploring biological processes. Here, we consider recovering gene co-expression networks from gene expression data, where each network encodes relationships between genes that are locally co-regulated by shared biological mechanisms. To do this, we develop a Bayesian statistical model for biclustering to infer subsets of co-regulated genes whose covariation may be observed in only a subset of the samples. Our biclustering method, BicMix, has desirable properties, including allowing overcomplete representations of the data, computational tractability, and jointly modeling unknown confounders and biological signals. Compared with related biclustering methods, BicMix recovers latent structure with higher precision across diverse simulation scenarios. Further, we develop a method to recover gene co-expression networks from the estimated sparse biclustering matrices. We apply BicMix to breast cancer gene expression data and recover a gene co-expression network that is differential across ER+ and ER- samples.
  • Substantial research on structured sparsity has contributed to analysis of many different applications. However, there have been few Bayesian procedures among this work. Here, we develop a Bayesian model for structured sparsity that uses a Gaussian process (GP) to share parameters of the sparsity-inducing prior in proportion to feature similarity as defined by an arbitrary positive definite kernel. For linear regression, this sparsity-inducing prior on regression coefficients is a relaxation of the canonical spike-and-slab prior that flattens the mixture model into a scale mixture of normals. This prior retains the explicit posterior probability on inclusion parameters---now with GP probit prior distributions---but enables tractable computation via elliptical slice sampling for the latent Gaussian field. We motivate development of this prior using the genomic application of association mapping, or identifying genetic variants associated with a continuous trait. Our Bayesian structured sparsity model produced sparse results with substantially improved sensitivity and precision relative to comparable methods. Through simulations, we show that three properties are key to this improvement: i) modeling structure in the covariates, ii) significance testing using the posterior probabilities of inclusion, and iii) model averaging. We present results from applying this model to a large genomic dataset to demonstrate computational tractability.